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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Board of Trustees records, 1836-2010"

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
TRUSTEE COMMITTEE MINUTES 1971-1973 

FINANCE 

May 14, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

June 22, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

September 21, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

December 9, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

December 28, 1971 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

February 17, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

April 19, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

May 26, 1972 UMASS Amherst 

August 16, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

September 26, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

November 21,1 972 Sheraton-Lincoln Inn, Worcester, MA 

January 22, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

March 7, 1973 Massachusetts 4-H Youth Center, Ashland, MA 

April 23, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

May 15, 1973, UMASS Amherst 

May 23, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 17, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

October 7, 1971 Blantyre Castle, Lenox, MA 

November 3, 1971 UMASS Amherst 

December 3, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

December 28, 1971 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

January 17, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

February 16, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

April 1 1, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

May 26, 1972 UMASS Amherst 

June 27, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

August 29, 1972 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

September 22, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

November 15, 1972 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

January 24, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

March 1 , 1 973 UMASS Amherst 

March 30, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

April 23, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

May 23, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

May 29, 1971 UMASS Amherst 

July 28, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

August 24, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

September 28, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

October 7, 1971 Blantyre Castle, Lenox, MA 

December 15, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

January 21, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

August 22, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

September 26, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

October 24, 1972 Sheraton-Regal Inn, Hyannis, MA 

November 21, 1972 Sheraton-Lincoln Inn, Worcester, MA 

January 16, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

January 31, 1973 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, MA 

February 15, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

March 7, 1973 Massachusetts 4-H Youth Center, Ashland, MA 

April 24, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

June 1, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

June 30, 1971 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

November 1, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston 

November 20, 1971 Northfield Inn, East Northfield, MA 

December 15, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

April 13, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

May 26, 1972 UMASS Amherst 

August 29, 1972 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

October 23, 1972 Sheraton-Regal Inn, Hyannis, MA 

December 11, 1972, 100 Arlington St, Boston, MA 

May 9, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 23, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

December 3, 1971 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

January 20, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 

February 17, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

March 28, 1972, UMASS Amherst 

April 14, 1972 UMASS Amherst 

May 26, 1972 UMASS Amherst 

June 27, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

September 28, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

November 10, 1972 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

January 3 1, 1973 Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston, MA 

February 28, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

April 19, 1973 UMASS Amherst 

May 22, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/universityofmass7173univ 



COUNSELING, ADVISING, AND SUPPORT SERVICES 

January 17, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. Boston 
February 16, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

GOVERNMENT AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

February 10, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 
March 21, 1973 President's Office, 1 Washington Mall, Boston, MA 

INTER-COLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

April 15, 1972 Lincoln, MA 

April 30, 1972 Chancellor's House, Amherst 

May 8, 1972 Holiday Inn, Newton, MA 

May 24, 1972 President's Office, 85 Devonshire St, Boston, MA 

UNIVERSITY/COMMUNITY RELATIONS 

November 28, 1972 Dorchester Field Office, 932 Dorchester Avenue, Boston, MA 



COMMITTEE 



3741 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May L4, 1971, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire Street 

Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustees Frechette, 
Gordon, Knowles; Treasurer Johnson, Assistant Secretary 
Harman 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips, 
Mr. Brand 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo, Vice Chancellor Campiqn; 
Professor John Roberts, representing the Faculty Senate; 
Lee Sandwen, President, Student Senate; Robert Nims, 
President, Student Union Governing Board; Messrs. Clay, 
Cruff, Elters, Stevens 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 10:00 a.ir. 

Vice Chancellor Campion presented a report on a preliminar 
budget for fiscal year 1972 for the Food Service Trust Fund. The 
proposal featured (1) an option of a 15-per-week meal ticket at 
$306.50 per semester or a 10-meal ticket at $271.50 per semester, 
(2) an increase in the conference rate from $4.25 per day to $4.75 
per day, and (3) a reduction of 83 personnel positions from the 394 
positions authorized in FY'71. After a general discussion of the 
assumptions upon which the proposed budget was prepared, the economijc 
factors included in the projections, and a comparative analysis of 
the budget, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 

September 1, 1971, the following be and hereby is adopted 
as the schedule of charges for meals to be served in 
Worcester Dining Commons: 

A. For 10 meals per week - $271.50 per semester 

B. For 15 meals per week - $306.50 per semester 

C. For conferences - $4.75 per day 
It was also 



Finance 
5-14-71 



UM/Amherst-- 
Food Service 
Trust Fund 
Budget, FY'72 



37 4S 



Finance 
5-14-7L 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 

September 1, 1971, pro rata refunds for the time remaining 
in the semester at the time of withdrawal shall be made 
to students who withdraw from the University after having 
paid a semester meal charge. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Chancellor 
of the University at Amherst be authorized to establish 
fees, rents, rates, and other charges for sales or services 
provided by the Worcester Dining Commons. 



It was then moved, secaaded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they recommend 
to the University of Massachusetts Building Authority that 
the following schedule of charges be adopted, effective 
September 1, 1971, for meals served in dining facilities 
included in the Third, Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth Projects 
of the Authority: 

A. For 10 meals per week - $271.50 per semester 

B. For 15 meals per week - $306.50 per semester 

C. For conferences - $4.75 per day 

and that, effective September 1, 1971, pro rata refunds for 
the time remaining in the semester at the time of withdraws 
be recommended to be made to students who withdraw from the 
University after having paid a semester meal charge. 



It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they recommend 
to the University of Massachusetts Building Authority that 
the Chancellor of the University at Amherst be authorized 
to establish fees, rents, rates, and other charges for sale 
or services for individual meals and other food and service 
items provided in dining facilities included in the Third, 
Fifth, Seventh, and Ninth Projects of the Authority. 



It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that all students 

living in University of Massachusetts/Amherst Residence Halls 
are required to purchase a meal ticket in accordance with 
Trustee policy, unless they qualify for exemption under one 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the following: 

A. Students who are 21 years of age before registration 
each semester. 

B. Graduate students. 

C. Seniors. 

D. Married students. 



This vote has the effect of deleting the present require- 
ment that all Southwest residents purchase meal tickets, as voted on 
November 17, 1967, in Document T68-Q13 . 

Vice Chancellor Campion introduced the proposed budget for 
the Campus Center/Student Union complex for fiscal year 1972. Presi 
dent Robert Nims of the Campus Center/Student Union Governing Board 
reported that this budget had been adopted by the Governing Board on 
May 6, 1971. An increase in annual fees from $48.00 for undergradu- 
ates and $38.00 for graduate students to $60.00 for both graduate anji 
undergraduate students was expected to yield an estimated revenue of 
$1,273,800 during fiscal year 1972. After discussion, it was moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if adopted by 
the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, the 
following schedule of rates, fees, rentals, and other 
charges for the use of accommodations in and goods and 
services provided in the campus center portion of the 
Eleventh Project of the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority be approved, effective September 1, 1971, 
namely: 

Student Use Fee 

$60.00 as the fee for graduate and undergraduate students 
on a semester basis, to be paid by students at the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts in Amherst and Hadley for use of sucji 
campus center. 

Meeting Room Fees 

Non-university affiliated and off-campus organizations 
Meeting Room Fees - Single Session Use 



Rooms accommodating 



1-15 persons 
16-50 persons 
51-150 persons 
151-250 persons 
251-700 persons 



$ 12.50 per session 

25.00 per session 

35.00 per session 

75.00 per session 

150.00 per session 



374! 



Finance 
5-14-71 



UM/ Amherst-- 
Project Eleven 
Trust Funds- 
Student Union 
Budget FY' 72 



3744 



Finance 
5-14-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Residence 
Hall Budgets, 
FY'72 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Multiple Session Use 















Full 


Rooms 


1-15 persons 


1st 




2nd 


3rd 


Day 


Ac c onuio - 


$ 12.50 


$ 


10.00 


$ 10.00 


$ 32.50 


dating 


16-50 persons 


25.00 




20.00 


20.00 


65.00 




51-150 persons 


35.00 




25.00 


25.00 


85.00 




151-250 persons 


75.00 




50.00 


50.00 


175.00 




251-700 persons 


150.00 




75.00 


75.00 


300.00 




Accommodations 


Fees 







Overnight accommodation fees for registered guests using 
the garage for their automobiles, a charge of one dollar 
($1) per day to be added to the room rate. 

Conference Fees 

Registered Division of Continuing Education programs sched- 
uled on the Amherst campus to be charged on the following 
basis for use of the campus center: one dollar ($1) per 
registered conferee for one-day programs; two dollars ($2)) 
per registered conferee for programs for two days; three 
dollars ($3) per registered conferee for programs of .tikxee or 
more days, and to amend the three dollar ($3) per person per 
conference fee for all other conference type programs in ac 
cordance with the above rates. 

Group Dining Service 
Tray-type luncheon service: $1.65 and up; banquet service 
luncheon: $2.50 and up; banquet service-dinner: $3.65 anc 
up. 

Mr. Campion next presented a report on the Residence Hall 
Preliminary Budgets for fiscal year 1972. At the request of President 
Lee Sandwen of the Student Senate and Mr. Glenn Elters, Chairman 
Pumphret read the report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Rents and Fees 
from the minutes of the April 25, 1971, Special Meeting of the Studerjt 
Senate. Mr. Pumphret requested that the document be distributed to 
the Board. General discussion followed. 

It was then moved, in regard to Building Authority Project 
Dormitories, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if adopted by 
the University of Massachusetts Building Authority, the 
following charges for student accommodations in dormitories 
of the Authority be approved, effective September 1, 1971 



Project Dormitories Semester Charge 
First Project $ 275 

Twelfth Project $ 350 

All Other Projects $ 305 



Daily Charge 
(all periods less 
than one semester) 

$ 2.45 

$ 3.15 

$ 2.75 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also moved, in regard to unrenovated dormitories in 
the Residence Halls Trust Fund, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective Sep 
tember 1, 1971, the following be and hereby is established 
as the charge for unrenovated dormitories in the Residence 
Halls Trust Fund: $275 per semester or $2.45 per day for 
periods less than one semester. 



It was further moved, in regard to renovated dormitories 
in the Residence Halls Trust Fund, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective Sep 
tember 1, 1971, the following be and hereby is established 
as the charge for renovated dormitories in the Residence 
Halls Trust Fund: $305 per semester or $2.75 per day for 
periods less than one semester. 



374 a 



Finance 
5-14-71 



Chancellor Tippo presented the Budget Act of the Student 
Union Government Association, UM/ Amherst, incorporated in Student 
Senate Document 71-51, as approved on April 20, 1971. The Chancelloi: 
commended the Student Senate for their responsibility and effective- 
ness and suggested that their recommendations to reduce the Student 
Tax by $1.00 and £\a Class Tax by $4.00 be adopted by the committee. 
It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the UM/Amherst 
Student Senate recommendation that the Student Activity Ta:c 
for 1971-72 be established at $35.50. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend that the Board of Trustees approve the UM/Amhorst 
Student Senate recommendation that the senior tax (Class ojc 
1972) for 1971-72 be established at $4.00. 



Mr. Clay gave an oral and preliminary report on a proposed 
plan for surface parking on the Amherst campus. He stressed that hi 
study had revealed problems in the security of parking lots, the 
decreasing quality of parking, and the diminishing supply of availab 
spaces as construction increases and the number of vehicles coming tty 
campus increases. An estimated 17,000 cars are expected to register 
on campus next semester. The lack of legislative support for the coiji 
struction and operation of parking lots in the past five years led 
Mr. Clay to the conclusion that all alternative plans would involve 
charging parking fees for surface parking in the future. 



UM/Amherst- 
Student 
Activities 
Tax 



UM/Amherst-- 
Preliminary 
Parking Report 



3746 



Finance 
5-14-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Mary Maher 
Endowment Fund 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Budget Transfer 



UM/Amherst-- 
Budget Transfers 
Non-state Funds 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo noted that on August 18, 1970, the Mary A 
Maher Scholarship fund was established as a perpetual tribute to Dean 
Emeritus Mary A. Maher. The earned income will be used for scholar- 
ships to assist Junior or Senior students in Nursing. 

The Chancellor suggested a motion which would establish a 
new endowment fund from this scholarship account. It was moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Mary A. Mahii 
Scholarship account in the amount of $6,202.85 be established 
as an Endowment Fund for the purpose of awarding a scholar- 
ship to an incoming Junior or Senior Nursing student who 
has a quality point average of 2.0; is a good citizen; sho^s 
evidence of good citizen; shows evidence of good physical 
and mental health, initiative, and self-direction; and 
demonstrates financial need. The recipient shall be selected 
in accordance with the criteria established by the Amherst 
University Scholarship Committee on Financial Aid which 
shall also determine each year the amount of the award. 
Any excess income remaining each year may be added to the 
principal of the fund. 



Mr. Clay noted the necessity to transfer funds from the 13 
account to the 14 account to meet telephone expenses. It was moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve a 

transfer at UM/Amherst in the amount of $70,000 from Account 
No. 7410-0000-13 to 7410-0000-14. 

Mr. Clay presented a proposal for transferring non-state 
funds, noting particularly that research overhead was currently belov 
the level anticipated at the time the budget was prepared for the 
Research Trust Fund. It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve a 

transfer of up to $50,000 from the University Computer Trus 
Fund to the Research Trust Fund. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve a 

transfer of $8,000 from the Institutional Allowance Account 
General to the Disadvantaged Students Program. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve a 
transfer of up to $100,000 of unbudgeted overhead to the 
Research Trust Fund. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Vice Chancellor Hamilton noted the progress of negotiation 
to transfer ownership of the campus bookstore from the UM/ Amherst 
Student Union to the Boston campus. The formal transfer of ownership 
is expected to be accomplished in June. 

The Chancellor anticipates approval of a special student 
fee for the purpose of funding a University Center on campus by the 
University Senate in time to come before the June Finance Committee 
meeting. The first charge on this fund would be for the purchase of 
the bookstore, to be called "The Book Shop." 

Preliminary to the setting of fees and the collection of 
funds, the Treasurer has set up three trust funds: (1) the Boston 
Book Shop Trust Fund, (2) the Boston Book Shop Petty Cash Fund, and 
(3) the University Union Fund. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton proposed a motion to transfer funjls 
within the Research Trust Fund to cover salaries of two grant admin- 
istrators, an additional faculty research grant, and miscellaneous 
expenses. It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Research' 

Trust Fund at the UM/Boston campus be adjusted as follows: 



Reserve 



$4,800 



Research Staff Salaries $ 2,000 
Contingency 2,000 

Faculty Research Grants 800 

Upon the suggestion of Vice Chancellor Hamilton, it was 
moved, seconded, in regard to budget transfers, UM/Boston, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the transfer 
of $10,000 from account 02 to account 03 be approved. 

Purpose: Additional funds needed for summer school 
(fiscal year 1971). 
Honoraria for President's Office. 
Additional temporary professional salaries- 
spring term. 

Forecasted additional needs for maintenance and 
security contracts. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the transfer of 
$5,000 from account 15 to account 08 be approved. 

Purpose: Additional steam requirements during spring months. 
Actual billings February through May ran 38% (or 
$5,850) above last year and well beyond forecasted 
level. 



374? 



Finance 
5-14-71 

UM/Boston-- 
"The Book Shop" 



UM/Boston-- 

Transfer of 

Non-state 

Fund Within the 

Research Trust 

Fund 



UM/Boston-- 
Budget 
Transfers 
State Funds 



3748 



Finance 
5-14-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they authorize 
a transfer of $1,900 from account 16 to account 10. 

Purpose: To provide for projected campuswide needs through 
year end. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they authorize 
a transfer of $11,000 from account 13 to account 14. 

Purpose: Additional funds required for telephone and 
postage needs through year end. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 







Ij&i^az?^ 



Lawrence J. Harman 
Assistant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 

EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
May 17, 1971, 2:00 p.m., President's Office, 85 Devon- 
shire Street, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustee Maginnis; Treasurer 
Johnson, Assistant Secretary (Pro Tem) Harman, Mrs. Hull 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Vice Chancellors Bromer 
and Gluckstern; Faculty Senate Representative Roberts; Mr 
Darland 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, Dean Hoopes 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 2:00 p.m. and called 
for discussion of Faculty Loads, UM/Amherst and UM/Boston . 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern reviewed his report on Faculty 
Teaching Loads--UM/ Amherst (Document T71-105 ) which had been previou 
circulated. 



He pointed out the difficulties involved in construction 
of a formula which accurately defines the work requirements both 
classroom and nonclassroom of a faculty member as classroom hours 
represent only a small portion of total responsibilities. The studeht- 
teacher ratio of 15:1 for the campus as a whole is, of course, the 
general determining factor for teaching loads. At present, the normal 
load for a faculty member has been defined as 9 classroom hours for 
a professor actually involved in research or scholarship, and 12-15 
hours for one without this involvement. 



Assignment of teaching responsibilities is felt, Dr. Gluck 
stern said, to be a departmental responsibility. Department heads 
are asked to defend assignments of less than 9 hours per week of 
classroom teaching. Explanations considered acceptable would includ^ 
large class sections, supervision of graduate and teaching assistant 
and major administrative responsibilities and committee assignments. 



3749 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
5-17-71 



UM/Amherst-- 
sly Report on 

Faculty Teach- 
ing Loads 



Dog. T7 1-105 



Trustee Maginnis felt that the system for determining facu 
loads; as outlined by Dr. Gluckstern, is probably the only workable 
system possible. 



-ty 



In response to questions from the Chairman, Dr. Gluckstern 
said that professorial rank is not a basis for teaching load assign- 
ments at UM/Amherst. He also outlined the UM/Amherst philosophy tha : 
allows the young faculty member, whenever possible, to teach in his 



3750 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
5-17-71 



UM/Boston-- 

COMMITTEE 

Report on 
Faculty Teach- 
ing Loads 
Doc. T71-106 



UM/Amherst-- 
Report on 
Pass-Fail 
Grading 

Doc. T71-107 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

specialized field (rather than in the large introductory classes) 

and with a lighter classroom load in general than the more experienced 

faculty member. 

Faculty Loads--UM/Boston were next discussed by Dean Hoope.s 
(Document T71-106 ) . The policies described, he siad, were essential .y 
those existing when he had assumed office. A normal load for a full 
professor at UM/Boston is six hours (two preparations) and nine hours 
(two preparations) for all other full-time teaching faculty. There 
are a number of full-time faculty with reduced teaching loads due to 
administrative assignments. 

Chairman Troy raised the question of possible need for uni 
formity between the Boston and Amherst campuses in regard to faculty 
teaching loads. He also questioned the advisability of a "flat rule 
for a two-course load for a faculty member, without qualification. 

There was considerable discussion on these issues, and gen- 
eral consensus that the matter of faculty teaching loads should be 
discussed by UM/Boston department heads and faculty. Copies of the 
minutes of this meeting and of Dr. Gluckstern's very detailed report 
are to be distributed. 

Chancellor Broderick noted that the UM/Boston teaching loac 
had been established when he assumed the Chancellorship. He also 
pointed out that an "enormous amount" of planning time is necessary 
in a new institution, and that this was, of course, reflected in 
faculty teaching loads. 

Chairman Troy stated his feeling that the firmest possible 
statement should be made regarding faculty teaching requirements that 
would allow, at the same time, the degree of flexibility necessary 
to fit individual circumstances. 

Pass-Fail Grading- -UM/ Amherst was next discussed by Dr. 
Gluckstern, on the basis of a report written for the committee by 
Associate Provost David Bischoff (Document T71-107 ) . 

The system of pass-fail grading began at UM/ Amherst in the 
fall of 1969. The policy in effect allows a single pass-fail course 
each year, which may not be in a core course or in a major. A studei 
has ten days, at registration, in which to exercise the pass-fail 
option; the course cannot be converted to a regular grading basis aftjer 
this ten-day period. For purposes of evaluation of the system, the 
instructor does not know which students are taking the course pass- 
fail; grades are converted in the Registrar's Office. 

Statistics, conclusions, and comparisons made in the report 
were extensively discussed. Further analysis, Dr. Gluckstern said, 
will depend on additional statistical information. A more subjective 
evaluation is planned which will involve student response to the sys- 
tem. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Gluckstern also noted that the Faculty Senate has ap- 
proved a new policy which would increase the total number of pass-fai 
courses allowed to fifteen. 

Chairman Troy asked why the Faculty Senate had made this 
decision when evidence at this point would seem to indicate a lack of 
enough information for a full subjective analysis of the system. Dr. 
Gluckstern indicated that the decision was based on the assumption thht 
students cannot benefit from a reduction of academic pressure early 
in their college careers as they are then involved in the core course 
Also, he said, much of the argument is based on the fact that it is 
desirable to see if the motivation for academic achievement can be 
switched from the reward system to the actual search for knowledge. 
On this basis, and even with incomplete evaluations, the decision was 
made to broaden the options. 

The School of Education is not included in the basic report 
as the system in use there is entirely pass-fail. The Faculty Senate 
has recently passed a motion (included in Document T71-107 ) which sug 
gests that the School of Education proceed on a more elaborate evalua 
tion of their system than they had originally planned to do. 

In response to the Chairman's questioning as to possible 
effect of fail grading on teacher's job applications, Dr. Gluckstern 
said that the fact of the system's having been in operation for only 
two years precluded these effects, if any, from being known. 

In response to questions asked by Chancellor Tippo, Dr. 
Soutter said that he could foresee the possibility of problems devel 
oping with pass-fail grading as far as Medical School students are 
concerned. 

Chairman Troy, noting that obvious differences existed bet 
ween the UM/ Amherst and UM/Boston pass-fail systems, requested Dean 
Hoopes to comment on the UM/Boston procedures. 

The Report on Pass-Fail Grading--UM/Boston , Dean Hoopes 
is a more modest one because of obvious differences in staffing and 
equipping of the Boston Registrar's Office (Document T71-108 ) . The 
major point of difference with the Amherst system is that a student 
is allowed one pass-fail course per seirester, without qualification 
The course may be in any subject, including a major; and the option 
to choose pass-fail grading is open until mid-semester. There is no 
effort at UM/Boston to concoal the identity of the pass-fail student 
from the instructor. 

Chairman Troy commented on the "rather pessimistic" conclu 
sions drawn in the report and on the fact that the pass-fail option 
is allowed at all in some courses; for instance, in French or other 
language courses. 



3751 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
5-17-71 



UM/Boston-- 
Report on 
Pass-Fail 
Grading 



Doc. T7 1-108 



3752 



F & EP 
5-17-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Report on 
Attrition 
Rates 

Doc. T71-109 



UM/Boston-- 
Report on 
Attrition 
Rates 

Doc. T71-110 



UM/Amherst-- 
Report--Disad- 
vantaged 
Program (CCEBS) 

Doc. T71-111 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Pass-fail grading, the Chairman felt, offers the obvious 
advantage if providing the opportunity for concentration on the sub- 
stance of a course rather than a grade. He did not feel, however, 
that was sufficient evidence that this is actually the case with the 
majority of students electing the pass-fail option. A "touch" look 
should be taken, he said, on this important decision before firm com 
mitments to the system are made. 

Attrition Rates--UM/Amherst were reviewed next by Dr. 
Gluckstern. A report written by Associate Provost Bischoff provided 
the basis for discussion and was gone over in detail (Document T71- 
109 ) . 

The Chairman and Trustee Maginnis were particularly concerned 
with the circumstances of a student's actually "flunking out." The 
grade levels for academic dismissal were detailed and it was emphasec. 
that this cannot now occur in mid-semester. 

Attrition Rates--UM/Boston were discussed by Dean Hoopes 
(Document T71-110 ) . He noted that the same standards of grade point 
averages apply as at UM/ Amherst. The attrition tables were discussec. 
in detail. It was pointed out that these show the total enrollment 
for each year of UM/Boston operation, broken down to show the percent: 
age dismissed and those leaving for other reasons, or total attritior. 

Chairman Troy asked if the retention rate was increasing as 
the advisory and counseling procedures are strengthened. Dean Hoopes 
felt that the time span involved had been too short for emergence of 
clear patterns in this respect. Chancellor Broderick stressed the 
fact that even more needs to be done in the area of counseling than 
funds presently allow. 

Trustee Maginnis observed that there must be a relationship 
between admissions policy and attrition rates. Chancellor Broderick 
agreed with this premise saying that as UM/Boston has become more 
selective the rate of academic dismissal should certainly decline. 
Dean Hoopes pointed out that the figures in the attrition tables shov 
that this is already the case if the figures for 1966 are compared 
with those of 1970. Both the Chairman and Trustee Maginnis agreed 
that admissions standards must be high enough to keep attrition rates 
at acceptable levels. 

Disadvantaged Programs were next discussed. Vice Chancellc 
Bromery reviewed the CCEBS Disadvantaged Students Program--UM/ Amherst 



(Collegiate Education of Black Students). This report (Document T71 - 



111 ) traces the history, funding, and changes in the program since 
its inception in 1968. Dr. Bromery noted that, of the total 2.3 mil 
lion in the program's funding since 1968, only 35% had come from the 
state and some 557« from foundation and federal sources. Outside 
sources of funding are, however, "drying up," Dr. Bromery said. 

Dr. Bromery described the educational philosophies and tech 
niques involved in this program. Essentially, the program uses a 
tutorial rather than a "bridge" approach. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



J 



3753 



i; 



nt 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He also described the ethnic makeup of the CCEBS students, 
saying that in the beginning the students had been almost entirely 
black, as admission to the program had been based on need and that 
this was the "area of the greatest need." Now, he said, admissions 
are changing with Puerto Rican and American Indian students coming 
into the program. 

The success of the program is evidenced in the fact that 
several hundred applications were received this year without any 
recruiting effort. Funding has permitted acceptance of only 100 of 
these new students; 500 are already in the program. 

The UM/Boston Disadvantaged Student Program was reviewed b 
Dean Hoopes (Document T71-112 ) . The "bridge" approach is used in 
Boston, as only classroom hours can be involved with commuting stude 
Special classes are discouraged. . although there is some unavoidable 
grouping of disadvantaged students within certain classes. 

Chairman Troy noted evidence that the percentage of holdin 
within the program is is increasing. He also commented on the point 
made by Mr. Chapman in his report-- that there do not seem to be spe- 
cial problems of adjustment to the University among the Boston stude 
participating in the disadvantaged program. The importance of incre 
counseling services for students within the program was emphasized. 
There was also consensus that a more affirmative title for these pro 
grams, in general, would be desirable. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton requested approval of renewal of .i 
Contract for Special Educational Services between the Boston School 
Committee and UM/Boston . Involved is a program of recruitment and 
training of library aides for the City of Boston. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice Chancellor 
William R. Hamilton be and hereby is authorized on behalf 
of the Board of Trustees to contract with the Boston Schoo 
Committee under a program to train Urban Librarians at the 
University of Massachusetts/Boston, as detailed in Documen 
T7 1-104 . 

UM/ Amherst AID Contract with Nigeria was discussed by Vice 
Chancellor Gluckstern. He discussed the status report submitted by 
Director of International Programs, Dr. Barbara Burn (Doc. T71-113) . 
Involved is a proposal that would be jointly undertaken by UM/Amhers 
and the University of Connecticut to staff a four-year training pro- 
gram at the Institute of Ife, Ibadan, Nigeria. The purpose of the 
program is to educate government administrators in Nigeria for eval- 
uation of proposals for development in agriculture, industry, and 
other areas. The proposed form of the agreement has been checked 
with UM/ Amherst's legal counsel. 



F & EP 
5-17-71 



UM/Boston-- 
Report--Disad- 
ijits.vantaged Stu- 
dent Program 



Doc. T71-112 



s 
sed 



UM/Boston-- 
Contract with 
Boston School 
Commit tee -- 
Training of 
Library Aides 

Doc. T71-104 



UM/Amhers t-- 
AID Contract 
with Nigeria 

Doc. T71-104 



3754 



F & EP 
5-17-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Heads of 
Departments of 
Hispanic 
Languages and 
Literature, 
Art, and 
Physics and 
Astronomy 



UM/Amherst-- 
Appointment, 
Dean of the 
School of 
Physical 
Education 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

During the ensuing discussion, it was pointed out that this; 
program will have numerous benefits for the cooperating universities 
while at the same time performing a needed service in Nigeria. Costs: 
of the program will be borne by AID. 

After discussion, and on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve the 
Proposed Contract between UM/ Amherst and the Institute of 
Administration, University of Ife, Ibadan, Nigeria, as de 
tailed in Document T71-113 . 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern next reported on recommendations 
of appointment for three new department heads at UM/ Amherst. 

Dr. Harold Boudreau has been recommended as Chairman of the 
Department of Hispanic Languages and Literature. He received his A.I 
from the University of Illinois in 1948; A.M., University of Illinois 
in 1951; and his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1966. Dr 
Boudreau has been a member of the faculty at UM/ Amherst since 1958. 



Also being recommend, as Chairman of the Department of Art, 
is Dr. George Wardlaw. He received his B.F.A. from the Memphis Academy 
of Arts in 1951; M.F.A. from the University of Mississippi in 1965. 
Professor Wardlaw has served on the faculties of the University of 
Miss., L.W.U. , State Univ. of New York at New Paltz, and at Yale 
University. He has been a member of the UM/ Amherst faculty since 196|8, 

Professor Leroy F. Cook has been recommend to head the 
Department of Physics and Astronomy. He received his Ph.D. at the 
University of California at Berkeley in 1959. Professor Cook served 
on the Princeton faculty and has been at UM/ Amherst since 1965, serving 
as acting head of the department for the past eighteen months. 



In each case appointments have been made after extensive 
work by departmental search committees and on their enthusiastic re- 
commendations . 

Chancellor Tippo announced the decision of the search com- 
mittee which has been working to find a replacement for retiring Dean 
of the School of Physical Education, UM/Amherst, Warren McGuirk. The 
committee has chosen as Dean McGuirk 1 s successor, Dr. David Bischoff, 
who is now serving as Associate Dean, School of Physical Education, 
and Associate Provost at Amherst. Dr. Bischoff holds a B.A. and Ph.D 
from Pennsylvania State University. 

Dean McGuirk filled the dual role of Dean of the School of 
Physical Education and Director of Athletics. It is planned to divid^ 
chese duties and to have the Director of Athletics report to the Dean 
of the School of Physical Education. A search committee will now be 
established to make recommendations for this post. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dean Soutter announced three new Appointments to the UM/ 
Worcester Medical School Faculty . Of these, only Dr. Burke will be 
serving on a full-time, salaried basis. The other two appointees ar£ 
serving voluntarily, without salary. 

These appointments are: 

William M. Burke, M.D., Assistant Professor of Community 

Medicine 

Joseph Ruggiere, Jr., M.D., Clinical Instructor in Patholo 
Michael Barbarich, M.D., Clinical Instructor in Pathology 

Dean Hoopes presented the UM/Boston Tenure Recommendations 
effective September 1, 1972 . The list of twenty-one members of the 
faculty being recommended for tenure was reviewed by Dean Hoopes 
(Document T71-100 ) . 



I 



After discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve th 
UM/Boston Tenure Recommendations, effective September 1, 
1972, as detailed in Document T7 1-100 . 

Conflict of Interest and Nepotism in terms of needed systen 
wide review of policies was discussed on a preliminary basis. A full 
report will be made at a later date. 



The meeting was adjourned at 4:20 p 






m. 




£Vi^tsi^6-**^_ 



Lawrence J. Harman 
Assistant Secretary 
Board of Trustees 



3755 



F & EP 
5-17-71 

UM/Worcester- 
Medical 
School 
Appointments 



UM/Boston-- 
Tenure 
Recommenda- 
tions 

Doc. T71-100 



3756 

Executive 
5-29-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester-- 
Medical School 
Faculty 
Affiliations 



Delegations of 

Authority-- 

Personnel 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
: May 29, 1971, 11:30 a.m., Room 174, Campus Center, UM/ Amherst 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Pumphret, Rowland 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Assistant Secretary Harman, Mrs. 
Hull 

Administration, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman, Phillips 

From UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Tippo 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick 

From UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 11:30 a.m. 

Dean Soutter suggested that faculty members at the Medical 
School may be affiliated with the Worcester area hospitals concurrent 
with their University appointments. The Dean discussed financial 
mechanisms which the hospitals may use to provide compensation to the 
faculty for their hospital-related responsibility, including those 
that would be supplementary in nature or in the form of reimbursement 
to the University. 

President Wood felt that from a policy viewpoint this 
appeared to be a constructive relationship between the Medical School 
and the neighboring hospitals; however, he wanted to alert the com- 
mittee and get their concurrence in principle before bringing up 
specific contracts for consideration. Chairman Healey noted that 
this was a problem of the future, with our teaching hospital in the 
offing, but not of the present. He instructed the President and the 
Dean to proceed with administrative arrangements for individual con- 
tracts and to present the specifics to the Executive Committee at 
appropriate dates. 



President Wood introduced the latest draft of proposed dele- 
gations of Board authority on personnel management. Treasurer Johnson 
had written the original draft of the delegations after full discuss:. on 
in the President's Council. The latest proposal, distributed to the 
entire Board earlier in the month, was the result of Attorney Austin 
Broadhurst's revision to ensure conformance with provisions of the 
General Laws and the By-laws of the Board. 



The President noted that the delegations of Board authorit 
were being formulated at the request of the Board following the Hyann 
seminar meeting in December. The proposed delegations presently bef<p 
the Board were limited to personnel matters. Other areas for delega 
tion of Board authority, such as fiscal affairs, would be forthcoming 
from the President's Council. 



is 
re 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President said that the present proposal had three mam 
features. First, it preserved for the Board the authority to create 
positions and titles, determine salary ranges, decide on those sala 
ries to be permitted over the General Salary Schedule, and grant ten 
to faculty. Secondly, it preserved for the President the authority 
to establish the administrative structure of the University, in his 
own office, in the designation of cheif administrative posts on campjus 
and the description of duties and use of consultants. Thirdly, autho 
rity would be delegated to the Chancellors and the Dean of the Medicjal 
School to make those decisions on professional and nonprofessional 
staff that are within their operational capability and responsibility 

Chairman Healey noted that Section I, 2, of the General 
Section stated that authority delegated in regard to "appointments 
and promotions to and in the professional staff" may be exercised 
"only after recommendation from the appropriate Chancellor, Dean, 
Department Head or other appropriate professional staff member." 
The Chairman stated that this general section would apply throughout 
to subordinate sections of the delegation document. He questioned 
whether requiring a recommendation would limit the President's ad- 
ministrative prerogatives. The President replied that a recommenda- 
tion could be positive or negative, but does not limit his course of 
action. He would, of course, be free to take final action as he 
determined for those positions designated, and he would review all 
personnel actions before presenting them to the Board. In the mean- 
time, the process of requesting a review and recommendation from 
appropriate campus and administrative personnel is a valuable contri- 
bution to the President. For campus positions delegated to Chancelljors 
or the Dean of the Medical School, the President would not make spe- 
cific appointments without consultation; and as Dean Soutter observed 
there would be no consulting to a principal without the concurrence 
of the campus. 

Several minor changes in language were offered by the 
Chairman and the committee. The President observed that this would 
reduce the deluge of personnel actions transmitted to the Trustees. 
The President's Office would receive monthly reports of personnel 
actions and would submit quarterly reports to the Trustees. 

The Chairman affirmed the necessity for these delegations, 
noting that the authority which the Board delegated could always be 
taken back by the Board. 

Chairman Healey stated that he would present the delegation s 
as proposed to the full Board for their favorable consideration. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 







^LA^u^ti£^<^_^ 



Lawrence J. Harman 
Assistant Secretary, Board of Trustees 



375: 



xrz- 



Executive 
5-29-71 



Delegations of 
Authority- 
nre Personnel 



3758 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



1 



COMMITTEE 



3 7 59 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



1 



J 



6 7 60 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
June 22, 1971, 10:30 a.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire Street 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret , President Wood; Trustees Gordon, 
Knowles; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Assistant 
Secretary Harman, Mrs. Holden 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Messrs. Brand and Cass 

From UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, representing 
Chancellor Tippo; Vice Chancellor Campion, Dean Dwight 
Allen, Mr. Clay 

From UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton 

Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 10:30 a.m 
Informal discussion followed on an item not included in the agenda. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern presented a proposal for a pro 
gram, sponsored last year by Senator Brooke's office, to provide 
recreational, cultural, and educational opportunity for under- 
privileged youth in Massachusetts under the supervision of University 
staff in cooperation with Community Action groups. The program 
would be carried out at Westover, Otis, and Fort Devens Army Bases. 
Dean Dwight Allen of the School of Education, UM/ Amherst, explained 
that 20,000 children would be involved in two-week periods starting 
July 1. After the Committee had discussed various details concern- 
ing contracts and financial responsibility, President Wood called 
for a staff meeting to resolve the details in such a way that the 
University's involvement would be mainly at the educational and pro- 
gram levels while certain other aspects of the proposal could be 
carried directly by the Community Action groups. It was agreed 
that the Committee need take no formal action at this time. 



Treasurer Johnson reported that the University's invest- 
ment counsel did not have any items to present to the meeting. 
However, the Treasurer requested permission to sell the rights to 
acquire 43 shares of telephone stock, based on the 858 shares owned. 

Following a brief discussion and on motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To sell the 43 rights of telephone stock owned by the 
University. 

Treasurer Johnson proposed holding the Ben B. Seligman 
Memorial Fund as a Trust Fund until additional deposits are re- 
ceived. Chairman Pumphret expressed his concern that, although all 
bequests are gratefully accepted, small amounts might be combined as 
being more valuable to the recipient. Trustee Knowles suggested pub 

licizing the Fund through the alumni magazine. Treasurer Johnson 
stated that Mr. Brand has been studying Trust Funds and is preparing 
some recommendations for consideration by the Finance Committee. 



3761 



Finance 



Proposed Pro- 
gram for 
Underprivileged 
Youth 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 



Ben B. Seligman 
Memorial Fund 



3762 

Finance 
6-22-71 

Class of 1911 
Student Loan 
Fund 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst- - 
State Auditor's 
Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussion followed on the Class of 1911 Student Loan Fund , 
in memory of Henry Bowditch Morse. 

Born in Salem, Henry Bowditch Morse was a graduate of 
Salem High School and the University of Massachusetts, Class of 1911. 

Each year, while at the University, he won his letter in 
football, winning the selection of captain of the football team in 
tiis senior year. 

Following a successful athletic career at the University, 
ne taught science and engaged in training of high school football 
teams, first at Dean Academy, Franklin, and then for two years at 
Chicopee High School. 

He entered competitive business as chief chemist for the 
Rubber Footwear department of the Endicott Johnson Shoe Company. 
During World War II, he was one of five members of the U.S. Rubber 
ontrol Board of the War Production Board. 



VOTED : 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they accept 
the bequest in the amount of $2,701.88 made by Marie Y. 
Morse in memory of Henry Bowditch Morse for the purpose 
of establishing the Class of 1911 Student Loan Fund from 
which the principal may be loaned to students attending 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. 

The Committee reviewed the State Auditor's Report, UM/Amherg t 



:ogether with Treasurer Johnson's response (Doc. T71-119 ) . The re- 
)ort covers the last period during which the Treasurer of the Univer 
sity was responsible for the management of all fiscal operations on 
he Amherst campus. Chairman Pumphret noted that Chancellor Tippo has 
circulated a memo on the Amherst campus requiring all staff members tc 
;ubmit travel requests one week prior to out-of-state travel. The 
Treasurer is reviewing the travel policy of the University with the 
Intention of increasing flexibility. The Committee discussed in de 
ail notations made by the State Auditor on charges made by the 
School of Education to the Innovations Film Fund. Dean Allen explains 
he fund had been established for discretionary purposes, using 
royalty and rental income from sale and loan of the films as a source 
of income. It is not a fund set up for the purpose of producing 

ilms. He agreed that fund's purpose and use might be more readily 
understood by the auditors if it were renamed. It was agreed that the 
toherst administration and Dean Allen should submit a request through 
:he President's Office for such revisions in the operation of this 
account as will meet the necessary requirements. 

Regarding the auditor's comments on Residence Hall Trust 
Tunds, Chairman Pumphret requested Treasurer Johnson to have Universitjy 
Counsel Broadhurst obtain a legal opinion from the Attorney General, 
''he Committee agreed that the innocuous nature of criticisms in the 
audit report carried an implicit commendation of the UM/ Amherst ad- 
ministration. Chairman Pumphret was highly laudatory in his comments 
on the manner in which the University' s fiscal affairs had been 
carried out under the direction of the Treasurer during the period 
covered by the audit. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Since action on operating budgets for Fiscal 1972 cannot 
be taken until the Legislature provides appropriations, it was 
moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, whereas the 
Commonwealth has not as yet provided appropriations for 
the full fiscal year commencing July 1, 1971; and 

Whereas it is not possible for the Trustees of the Univ- 
ersity to authorize operating budgets for the fiscal year 
starting July 1, 1971, until state appropriations are 
made ; and 

Whereas the authorization to commit and disburse funds 
throughout the University is governed by the Trustee- 
approved operating budgets; 

Therefore, be it resolved that, until such time as operat 
ing budgets for the fiscal year July 1, 1971, to June 30 
1972, are approved by the Trustees, the President may dir 
ect the Chancellors and the Dean of the Medical School anc. 
other administrative officers to make such commitment of 
any funds and to authorize the expenditure of such sums 
as may be or may become available for the continued oper- 
ation of the University including the education of the in 
creased numbers of students already admitted, and to take 
any actions to implement this vote as in his judgment he 
may deem necessary or desirable reporting the same to the 
Trustees in the usual manner. 

Regarding the H ealth Service Trust Fund Fee, UM/Boston , 
Vice Chancellor Hamilton stated that a proposal to raise the fee ha- 
been delayed for two years. He requested approval of an increase i 
the amount of $1.00 per student per semester to meet rising costs 
without expanding services. President Wood commented that UM/Amher; 
will soon propose a plan with Hampshire College and that a policy 
paper will be prepared with recommendations for a vastly increased 
plan. Dr. Hamilton noted that more UM/goston students are using 
the health services, which may later be covered under the Harvard 
Health Plan along with Crown Point. 

On motion made and seconded (by President Wood, with re- 
servations), it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the Health Ser- 
vice Trust Fund Fee, UM/Boston, be increased in the amount 
of $1.00 per student per semester, from the present rate 
of $12.00 to $13.00. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton proposed an increase of $100.00 

in the UM/Boston program for one year of study in France. This 
would make the cost comparable with similar programs of other univ 
ersities. Trustee Gordon stated that he has personally observed and 
talked with students in this program and that there is mutual agree 
ment that it is most worthwhile. 



3763 



Finance 
6-22-71 



Continuing 
Budget, 
Fiscal 1972 



Continuing 
Budget, 
Fiscal 1972 



UM/Boston-- 
Health Service 
Trust Fund 
Fee 



UM/Boston-- 
Total Charges 
Increase for 
One Year of 

Study in 
France 



3764 



Finance 
6-22-71 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Bos ton- 
Trust Fund 
Budgets 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the total 

charges for the UM/Boston program for one year of study in 
France be increased in the amount of $100.00, from the pre- 
sent rate of $1900 to a new rate of $2000. 

Concerning Trust Fund Budgets, UM/Boston (Doc. T71-120), 



r 



President Wood reported that the proce 
campuses to committees and then to the 
Treasurer Johnson reported that it had 
budgets for all campuses would be pres 
Pumphret requested more detail on the 
The Book Shop to UM/Boston--specif ical 
loaned will revert back to the Univers 
keep Mr. Pumphret informed. 



ss of how budgets flow from 
Board is still under study, 
been agreed that Trust Fund 
ented together. Chairman 
item relating to transfer of 
ly, how the money that was 
ity. Dr. Hamilton agreed to 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:10 p.m. 




Robert J. /McCartney 
Secretary of the University 




I 



COMMITTEE 



3765 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT 

ACTIVITIES 
une 30, 1971, 10:00 a.m., Room 434, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRE SENT : Trustees and Trustee .S taff : 

Chairman Rowland, President Wood; Trustees Abrams, Croce, 
Lyons, Shaler, Snowden, Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Assistant Secretary Harman, Mrs. Holden 

Administra to rs, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From UM/Amherst: Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, representing 
Chancellor Tippo; Vice Chancellor Bromery; Professor Joseph 
Burroughs, representing the Faculty Senate; Miss Pepper and 
Messrs. Apostola and Sandwen, representing the Student Sen- 
ate; Mr. Elters 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Gerald J. Sullivan, 
Director of Student Affairs 

From Medical School : Dr. Richard H. Saunders, Associate 
Dean, representing Dean Soutter 

Chairman Rowland called the meeting to order at 10:10 a.m. 
The agenda consisted of various items on student affairs submitted by 
the three campuses as areas in which review and study by the Committed 
night be helpful. The list of items is appended to these minutes as 
Document T72-001 . 

Dr. Randolph Bromery, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, 
UM/Amherst, commented on the increase in the number of CCEBS students 
from three dozen in 1968 to next year's anticipated 400-600. He hope 
that efforts can soon be made to recruit other minority-race students 
who are not academically or financially needy to help offset the im- 
pression that all black students are enrolled in CCEBS. Recruitment 
of older minority-race students was mentioned as another possibility. 
In addition, the improvement of mutual understanding between white anf 
minority-race students, and improved counseling of minority-race 
students need immediate attention. Trustee Shaler inquired about the 
method used to determine financial need. He suggested that some form 
of assistance toward financial independence is important, especially, 
as Trustee Croce noted, with the present scarcity of part-time work 
opportunity. 

Mr.. Gerald Sullivan, Director of Student Affairs, UM/Boston 
agreed that a strong recruitment program for minority-race students i£ 
needed in Boston as well. 

Trustee Snowden stressed that the words "black" and "dis- 
advantaged" are not and should not be considered synonymous. She has 
talked with CCEBS students at UM/Amherst who say that there is no 
person always available to them when they need help. She expressed 



Student 

Activities 

6/30/71 



Subjects for 
Study & Review 
in Student 
Affairs Areas. 
(Doc. T72-001) 



3766 



Student 

Activities 

6-30-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

:oncern about the status of the Black Studies Program at UM/B°ston 
Indicating that the overall University experience for minority-race 
students needs review and attention by the Committee. Dr. Croce pro- 
posed an ombudsman- type position as possibly being useful for keeping 
n touch with problem areas. 

Mr. Sullivan said that UM/Boston prefers to think of their 
urogram as a Special Admissions Program (350 students this year) 

since only about 60 percent of these students are from minority groups 
Counseling available to this group is proportionately equal to that 

available to all other students, although the entire service should be 

reviewed. 

In outlining a plan for Committee action, Mrs. Snowden pro- 
posed reviewing the entire minority-race living experience within 

:he total University structure. Specific areas of immediate concern 
would be identified and plans developed to meet the needs. She was 
particularly concerned that the minority students become aware that 

jolicy-making officials do care about their problems and will move to 

find solutions within a reasonable length of time. 

Dr. Bromery pointed out that, while some students will come 
:o a counselor, there are hundreds of other faculty and staff members 
with whom they come in contact. He noted that a human relations 
;?roup will be developed at UM/Amherst to work with personnel to effect 
setter interaction with minority groups. At the student level, black 
counselors should be provided in the black residence hall at UM/Amher 
)r. Bromery said, while at UM/Boston, students with academic stabi- 
lity are used successfully as counselors. 

Chairman Rowland inquired what type of counseling is avail- 
able to all students on both campuses. Mr. Sullivan replied that, 

except for one full-time and three part-time counselors for the 
Special Admissions Program, there is no general counseling office of 

■my sort at UM/Boston, although there are a few sympathetic teachers 
available on a one-third time basis. 

Trustee Abrams observed that everyone needs counseling as 
stresses develop through the college experience. He felt that black 
counselors should be available for black students. He also urged 
:hat someone more accessible and with fewer high-level demands on 
heir time than top policy-making officials be provided to work with 
minority-race students. 

Trustee Rowland stated that the Committee will undertake a 
istudy in the fall on counseling for all students and particularly for 
ninority-race students. She requested that background information be 
supplied for all three campuses on the present status of student 
counseling, on community resources available, and on proposals for 

uture development. Mrs. Snowden noted that, at UM/Amherst, the ap- 
proach should start with the residence halls. 

Mr. Sullivan proposed discussion on UM/Boston student per- 
sonnel support services as related to student enrollment. Mrs. 
Rowland indicated that financial needs will be considered with the 
budget. Trustee Croce urged providing adequate counseling assistance 



t, 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

as preventive support before the stresses occur in the student. 

President Wood suggested that written or oral reports to th 
Committee by black students would be helpful. Consideration will 
start with UM/Boston items and Mr. Sullivan will supply information 
identifying areas of need and proposed staffing and budget requests. 
Following consideration of UM/Boston needs, the Committee will focus 
on UM/ Amherst, with Dr. Gage, Director of Human Services, invited to 
attend. 

Dr. Saunders, reporting for Dean Soutter, stated that the 
Medical School's small enrollment permits the faculty to meet stress 
situations as they occur. However, this is not necessarily an ideal 
situation and, as enrollment increases, a counselor will be needed. 
A report on projected future plans in this area will be prepared for 
the consideration of the Committee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:00 a.m. 



Robert j/ McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees, 






~7 



376^ 



Student 

Activities 

6-30-71 



3768 

Executive 
Committee 
7-28-71 



COMMITTEE 



System 
Office 
Agenda 



Organization of 
President ' s 
Office 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
uly 28, 1971, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire Street, 

Boston 



PRESENT: 



: 



Trustees and T rustee Staff: 

Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trustees Haigis, Pumphret 
Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Assistant Secretary Harman 

Adminis tra tion, Fa cul ty, Staff, and Inv ite d Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips, 
Mr. Cass 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Vice Chancellor 
Campion, Mr. Clay, Special Assistant to the Chancellor; 
Prof. Burroughs, rep. Faculty Senate. Also Honorary De- 
gree Committee: Prof. Sidney Wexler, Evan Johnston, 
Albert Olmstead, James Perry, Lee Sandwen 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick 

Fr om UM/Me dical Sc hool : Dr. Clark 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 
10:00 a.m. 

It was moved, seconded, and voted to go into executive 
session for the purpose of considering the roster of honorary de- 
gree nominees for Commencement, 1972. 

At 10:45 a.m., it was moved, seconded, and voted to come 
out of executive session for the purpose of continuing with the a- 
genda of the meeting. 

President Wood introduced the System Office agenda items, 
describing them as informational and requiring no formal action by 
the Board at this time. 

Draft documents had been transmitted to the Committee mem- 
bers on: (1) System Office reorganization, (2) implementation of 
delegations of authority, (3)" restructuring of certain Trustee pro- 
cedures, and (4) Trust Fund Budgets, to keep the Board informed on 
the progress of staff work and to solicit the Committee's comments. 

Dr. Wood commented briefly on the organization of the 
President's Office. He noted the restructuring of existing staff, 
the introduction of a policy analysis capability, and similarities 
and differences with organizational concepts put forth last year. 
Further discussion clarified the roles of presidential assistants 
to other staff functions; also, the distinction between institutes 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and similar activities in the System Office, and the hierarchical 
staff organization in the immediate President's Office. 

The President introduced Secretary McCartney's memorandum 
as responding to the twin issues of how the Board of Trustees moves 
toward a policy posture while continuing to maintain appropriate 
management overview. The issue of structuring full Board meetings 
to inform and enlighten the public on University issues as well as 
dispatch business was also considered. 

The Secretary recounted the events of the preceding year; 
evolution of new administrative structures at the System level, de- 
legations of certain Board powers, and the renewed enthusiasm of Trust- 
ee committees for exploring University policy issues in greater 
length and depth. It was pointed out that all of these changes may 
now have some bearing on the procedural patterns of the Board Com- 
mittees, for example, may now wish to meet several times on different 
aspects of the same policy topic, hearing reports from each of the 
several campuses prior to reporting a recommendation to the full 
Board. 

Several alternatives were posed and weighed by the Commit- 
tee. The Chairman asked the President and Secretary to continue to 
explore the problems of structure and agenda, and it was agreed to 
continue with the regular monthly meeting schedule for the time bein£ 

The President suggested another informal two-day gathering 
of the Trustees in October to review the activities of the past year 
A number of locations, dates, and formats for the gathering were dis 
cussed. Trustee Rowland asked the Secretary to poll the Board on 
their availability and preferences. 

Vice President Phillips, acknowledging the assistance of 
Mr. DeNyse on the Amherst campus, summarized the draft memorandum 
implementing the authority regarding personnel actions that the Boarc 
had previously delegated to the President. He stressed that an ad- 
equate reporting system back to the Board would be incorporated into 
the procedure. Mr. Phillips noted that although the draft was prelim- 
inary in nature it gave the Committee an opportunity to see the man- 
ner of implementation and offer their advice at this stage. Trustee 
Troy observed that administrative appointments, under Board policy, do 
not carry tenure. Brief discussion followed on the degree of uniform- 
ity which should prevail in personnel procedures among the campuses. 
It was agreed that the early reports under this policy would probabl} 
contain more detail than the Trustees might require later on. 

President Wood introduced the Trust Fund Budget item by saj- 
ing that no area of University administration is undergoing greater 
change than the budgetary and financial area. The establishment of 
a System Office not only altered assignments among the several cam- 
puses with respect to the new system structure, but caused a thor- 
ough review of budgeting and fiscal procedures on all campuses as well. 



3769 



Exec. Com. 
7-28-71 



Structure of 
Board of 
Trustees 



Informal 
Gathering in 
October 



Personnel 
Policy 



Budgetary and 
Financial Areas 



3770 

Exec. Com. 
7-28-71 



COMMITTEE 



Termination of 
Summer Domestic 
Action Program 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The first System budget review process will be completed 
this month. This will allow the President to present to the Trust- 
ees a total 1973 operating budget request package, including both 
state and non-state funds, at the August Board meeting. 

The President reported that the President's Council had 
developed yesterday a concensus on the definition of the three 
basic financial issues: first, that all recognized the need for a 
comprehensive budgeting process. Secondly, the Council acknowledged 
the general purpose of University activity in the President's Office 
and indicated a willingness to support that activity financially. 
The third issue was that there are separate and understandable 
positions regarding the allocation of trust funds whose purposes 
legal counsel identifies as University-wide in nature, but which by 
history and tradition were expended on the Amherst campus exclusively 

The principal issue emerging here is the question of sub- 
sidization of one campus by another. 

The President stressed that no trust fund budget adjust- 
ments should be made which impinge on present budgetary requirements 
The issue of allocation of University-wide trust funds would be 
raised in the 1972 operating budget document. It was also noted 
that no action would take place and no proposal would be forthcoming 
until Dean Soutter was able to participate in the continuing dis- 
cussions. 

The President asked Chancellor Tippo to comment. Chan- 
cellor Tippo then read a brief statement summarizing the Amherst 
campus position on allocation of trust funds. This paper has been 
circulated to the Committee. 

Chairman Healey next called for an executive session for 
further discussion of honorary degree candidate nominations. 

The Executive Committee came out of executive session for 
the purpose of considering UM/ Amherst State Fund Transfers and a 
brief report from Special Assistant Clay. 

Mr. Clay reported that the Trustee Committee on Finance 
had been informed earlier that financing of the Summer Domestic Act- 
ion Program was uncertain. It had been agreed that no credit line 
in excess of $150,000 would be extended by the University. Unless 
$70,000 can be raised by next Friday, the program will be given two 
weeks' termination notice. 

Mr. Clay also queried whether the Trustees present had 
any opposition to a graduated parking fee for University students, 
faculty, and staff. 

Trustees Pumphret and Rowland suggested instead that con- 
sideration be given to setting up a differentiated fee on the basis 
of assignment to preferred parking areas. 

Mr. Pumphret cited the report of UM/Amherst Director of 
Planning Littlef ield, and recommended involving University Counsel 
Broadhurst in this matter as soon as possible. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee next turned to consideration of a request 
to approve state funds transfers at UM/Amherst. 

Under the terms of the continuing resolution under which 
the Commonwealth is now operating, enough has been allocated in 
toto to the Amherst campus to cover operating expenses through 
September 15, 1971. The distribution of the allocation by ac- 
count requires temporary adjustments if all obligations are to be 
met on time. 

None of the transfers proposed takes an account above 
the level in House-1. All of the transfers are temporary and the 
Trustees will be asked to reverse them once the state budget is 
passed. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : That $8,000 be transferred from account 01 to account 07. 



Explanation: 



The entire appropriation in account 07-Laboratory 
and Medical Care goes to the School of Physical 
Education, which uses it for bandages, tapes, and 
other first aid supplies. These are customarily 
bought once a year in order to obtain the most 
favorable prices. 



It was further 
VOTED : That $274,000 be transferred from account 01 to account Of 



Explanation: 



Under the terms of the coal contract, coal is pur- 
chased throughout the summer to build up a winter 
stockpile. If purchases cannot be continued dur- 
ing the summer, the University will run a sign- 
ificant risk of being unable to obtain enough coal 
during the winter. 



It was also 

VOTED : That the President be authorized to transfer up to 

$50,000 from account 01 to account 15, subject to need. 



Explanation: 



No funds in account 15 (equipment) have been al- 
located to the University. The Trustees are 
asked to authorize this contingent transfer to 
cover any unforeseen emergency equipment needs 
which arise before the state budget is passed. 



It was then 

VOTED: That $206,000 be transferred from account 01 to account Hi 

Explanation: The current allocation in the 16 account (rentals) 
is $331,418 which is insufficient to cover debt 
service payments of $441,000, due between August 1 
and September 5, and other continuing rental ex- 



3771 



Exec. Com. 
7-28-71 

UM/Amherst- 
State Fund 
Transfers 



3772 

Exec . Com. 
7-28-71 

UM/Amherst- 
State Fund 
Transfers 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

penditures (e.g., administrative data processing equipment) 
The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 




Robert J . McCartney 
Secretary v or the Universit/ 



COMMITTEE 



1 



IJ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

August 24, 1971; 1:00 p.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 



PRESENT: 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey; President Wood; Trustees Pumphret, Rowland 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Assistant 
Secretary Harman, Mrs. Holden 

Adminis tr ation, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : 

Vice Presidents Lashman and Phillips, Mr. Kaplan 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Vice Chancellors 

Bromery and Campion; Vice Chancellor and 
Provost Gluckstern; Mr. Clay; Mr. Burroughs 
representing the Faculty Senate; Messrs. 
Apostola and Ladd, representing the Student 
Senate 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick 

From UM/Medical School : Dean Soutter 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



1:00 p.m. 



It was moved, seconded, and 



VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of con- 
sidering the selected list of honorary degree nominees 
for Commencement 1972. 

The meeting was resumed at 2:00 p.m. for consideration of 
the remainder of the agenda. 

President Wood reviewed various areas of University growth 
over the past ten-year period, 1962-1972. Areas covered included 
staff, personnel, faculty, and the student body. For the future, 
Dr. Wood foresees a leveling off of enrollment at UM/Amherst with a 
simultaneous acceleration at UM/Boston and the Medical School as 
those facilities develop. Details of the 1973 Budget Request, 
(Doc. T72-002) previously mailed to all Trustees, were then presented 
in a series of projected slides by Mr. Kaplan. Dr. Wood initially 
announced a consolidated budget request of $88,300,625. He re- 
viewed his recommendations for the campuses budgetary demands as 
various phases of academic growth are implemented. He stressed that 
the move is away from developing a budget ron a formula basis toward 
a program budget that can be justified in relation to educational 
purposes and specific program needs. 

Mr. Phillips emphasized that financial assistance in the 
form of undergraduate scholarships has been given primary consideration, 
with federal contributions anticipated as well as a small amount 



3773 



UM/Amherst- - 
Honorary Degrees 
Commencement , 
1972 



1973 FY 
Budget Request 



3774 

Exec. Com. 
8-24-71 



1973 FY 
Budget Request 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

from the Board of Higher Education. He also noted that this item 
contains money which, in other years, had been budgeted in the 
Disadvantaged Students Program, resulting in a substantial reduction 
in the latter item, which now includes only administrative, tutoring, 
and counseling costs. 

In reply to a question from Mr. Pumphret, Chancellor Brod- 
erick indicated that many students at UM/Boston are living in their 
own homes rather than with their parents, thus increasing their fin- 
ancial need while attending college. He added that 39% of UM/Boston 
acceptances are from the City of Boston, with 307° being financially 
needy . 

President Wood, replying to a question from Trustee Troy, 
stated that the figure of $5% million for Undergraduate Scholarships 
is based on no increase in tuition. However, further consideration 
on this is contingent on final action by the Governor. 

In line with the Board of Higher Education's projection of 
216,000 students in the Commonwealth by 1980, of which 50,000 will 
3e attending the various University facilities, President Wood ex- 
plained that the relative allocation among campuses is affected this 
year by the beginnings of deceleration of growth to the 25,000 figure 
at UM/Amherst. 

Two thoughts underlie this: 

1. We still accept the BHE projection of growth of 
the University to 50,000. 

2. We know we are in a time of severe stress in fund- 
ing assistantships in graduate education. 

In summary, the President said he felt the budget reflected 
:lear administrative response to the Trustee mandate on future growth 

President Wood stated that he hopes to present to the Board 
Ln October an analysis of growth at UM/Amherst and its impact on the 
:ommunity. Levelling-off provisions at the graduate level will be 
effected immediately in anticipation of the long-range plan. 

The President next turned to UM/Boston. The budget re- 
quest reflects an increase of 300 students. No provision is included 
it this time for a computer. Chancellor Broderick proposed dup- 
licating their whole curriculum in afternoon and evening hours as one 
solution to handling the increased enrollment proposed for the present 
.imited facilities there. 

In contrast to the 15:1 ratio of UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, 
he Medical School must provide a 12:1 ratio of students to faculty. 

President Wood reviewed in detail the present and future 
personnel requirements of the System Office, indicating that the 
future University Committee will complete most of its work next month 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

He pointed out that the position requests include many items for- 
merly carried on the Amherst and Worcester campus budgets. He plans 
to inform the Trustees at their October meeting regarding innovative 
and special support programs contemplated for the various campuses. 
A position of Academic Vice President, as well as another vice 
presidency, is being held in abeyance for now. Some new positions 
will be required in the budget and development areas. Actualization 
of the manning table will be effected as soon as possible after the 
President's Office moves to 1 Washington Mall where more space will 
be available. 

Dr. Wood requested that data for comparative evaluation of 
like functions among the campuses as well as separate costs by types 
of activities be researched and made available to him before he is 
required to defend the budget to the Legislature early in 1972. 

Trustee Pumphret called for further analysis on the hTL 
increase in the Boston budget. 

Trustee Troy noted that further information should be 
provided on College III at UM/Bos ton. 

Dr. Tippo addressed the committee indicating that, althoug 
the UM/Amherst administration understands the President's intentions 
and decisions in cutting their budget requests, it will mean ad- 
justments in both academic and support areas as well as in their 
criteria for accepting transfer students from community colleges. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they accept 
the recommendations uf President Wood on the University 
Fiscal Year 1973 Maintenance Budget Request and to ap- 
prove as a ceiling figure the amount of $88,822,775 
which will continue to be subject to refinement and 
reduction by the President in consultation with the 
Chancellors and the Dean of the Medical School. 

At Chancellor Tippo' s request, Mr. Clay proposed transfers 
in the COMTECH appropriation in order to support the program at a 
low level pending decisions on federal funding. Since the entire 
appropriation is in account 03, such continuation requires a number 
of routine transfers into the nonpersonnel accounts. 



3775 



Following a brief discussion, on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the follow- 
ing transfers between subsidiary accounts in the COMTECJH 
appropriation, UM/Amherst, be approved: 



Exec. Com. 
8-24-71 

1973 FY 

Budget 

Request 



UM/Amherst- 

COMTECH 

Transfers 



3776 

Exec. Com. 
8-24-71 



UM/Amherst 

COMTECH 

Transfers 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Amherst — 
Domestic 
Action Program 

Future 

University 

Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



a. 


$5 


,000 


from 


account 


03 


to 


account 


10 


b. 


$3 


,500 


from 


account 


03 


to 


account 


11 


c. 


$1 


,500 


from 


account 


03 


to 


account 


13 


d. 


$2 


,500 


from 


account 


03 


to 


account 


14 


e. 


$ 


500 


from 


account 


03 


to 


account 


15 


f. 


$ 


500 


from 


account 


03 


to 


account 


16 



Dr. Tippo reported that it now appears that the federally 
funded Domestic Action Program will end on normal schedule, and 
within its budget. 

President Wood distributed to the committee a preliminary 
draft of the Future Committee report, which will be sent to the full 
Board as soon as it is finalized. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:00 p.m. 





Robert J. /McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




n 



F 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

September 21, 1971, 12:30 p.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret; President Wood; Trustee Frechette; 
Treasurer Johnson, Assistant Secretary Harman, Mrs. Holden 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips, Messrs. 

Brand, Broadhurst, Heiney. 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; James Perry, Assistant 

to the Chancellor 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, Mr. Drinkwater 

From UM/Medical School : Dr. Saunders, representing 

Dr. Soutter 

From the Joint Center : Mr. Fowler 

From Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. : John Wood, investment 

counselor 

Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 12:40 p.m 

Chancellor Broderick distributed copies of the operating 
agreement for the Survey Research Center to be located at UM/Boston 
as a joint enterprise with Harvard and MIT. In line with previous 
Trustee interest in collaborating with private universities, Dr. 
Wood presented a request for the Establishment of a Trust Fund for 
the Survey Research Center , in connection with the urban program 
of the Joint Center. This Center represents the only academic 
capability of sustained public opinion surveys that exists in this 
area. In response to an invitation from Dr. Bernard Frieden, the 
new Director of the Joint Center, Dr. Wood has worked out an agree- 
ment with Presidents Bok and Wiesner whereby Harvard and MIT will 
make cash contributions. The University of Massachusetts will 
contribute in terms of space and administration, as outlined in the 
Operating Agreement (Doc. T72-003 ) . In return, the University will 
benefit from cut-rate services and special attention. It is 
expected that the effort will become self-supporting. Mr. Floyd J. 
Fowler, who will become Director of the Research Center, explained 
that the contemplated retirement of Dr. Frieden on June 30, 1973, 
had determined the cutoff date for the agreement; however, President 
Wood suggested that the Committee act only on the establishment of 
the Trust Fund. Mr. Broadhurst will be requested to review the 
final agreement. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they establis 
a Survey Research Center Trust Fund for the Boston 
Campus operation of the Survey Research Center. 



377? 



UM/Boston- 
S urvey 
Research 
Center 



3778 



Finance Comm. 
9-21-71 

Endowment Fund- 
Anonymous -- 
UM/Medical 

SchooJoMNUTTEE 



System Office- 
Report on 
Murray D. 
Lincoln Trust 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson presented the provisions of an Anonymous 
Endowment Fund for the UM/Medical School in the amount of $10,000, 
to be invested and reinvested until the principal reaches $50,000. 
either through accumulation of interest or additional accruals to 
the fund, at which time scholarships shall be awarded as determined 
by the Trustees. The names of the donors will then be placed on 
the fund. Mr. Johnson stated that the donors anticipate making 
annual supplements in the amount of $10,000 up to the $50,000 figure 
and have provided for the balance in their wills in the event of 
death. 

Replying to a question from President Wood, Mr. Brand 
stated that there are about 50 scholarship endowment funds, set up 
under various provisions, which are distributed by Deans, Department 
Heads, or Trustees. Chancellor Tippo noted that most of these are 
in agriculture. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

establish an endowment fund to provide scholarships 
for students at the Medical School at Worcester with 
the gift of ten thousand dollers ($10,000) received 
from anonymous donors and, in accordance with the terms 
of the gift, such funds are to be kept invested by 
the Trustees of the University of Massachusetts in such 
a manner as they may determine until the income earned 
thereon to be added annually to the principal of the 
fund until the total of the fund reaches fifty thousand 
dollars ($50,000) either by accumulation of the interest 
or through additional gifts or bequests to the fund, 
and thereafter the income from this fund is to be made 
available for one or more scholarships each year to 
students at the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School in Worcester in such a manner and amount as is 
customary for the selection and award of scholarships 
to students at the Medical School or as the Trustees 
may from time to time direct, and at the time of the 
first award of scholarships from the income from the fund 
the title is to be changed from Anonymous Medical School 
Scholarships to include the names of the donors. 

Treasurer Johnson distributed a list of securities already 
received by the University from the Murray P. and Anne H. Lincoln 
rrust totaling $268,764.84. Additional securities will be purchased 



?y the Trust after the first of October for later transfer to the 
Jniversity. 

The Treasurer next introduced the main item concerning 
ipproximately 70 acres of real estate northeast of Columbus, Ohio, 
)wned by the University and an additional 90 acres owned by the 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Murray Lincoln Trust, of which a 58 -acre unit contains the Lincoln 
home and other buildings. A realtor has tentatively offered $5,000 
an acre for the latter tract, plus some value for the buildings. 
However, Mr. Johnson has knowledge of other sales in the vicinity at 
appreciably higher amounts and will consult personally with Mr. P. 
L. Thornbury, Trustee of the Estate, in October about new appraisals, 
The intermediate agent in the proposed sale has requested a commissic|n 
of 6% if the transaction materializes, a percentage which the 
Treasurer considers reasonable. It was noted that the surrounding 
area is being developed rapidly and that the University's land 
(about 160 acres) should bring maximum price as soon as sewer and 
water facilities are installed. The Committee reiterated that the 
land is not being placed on the market, but that offers received by 
Treasurer Johnson will be considered. 



Mr. John Wood of Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., investment 
counsel, discussed Investments of the Endowment Fund and the Opera tir 
Fund . He distributed a listing of proposed exchanges of current 



3779 



Finance Comm. 
9-21-71 

Report on 
Murray D. 
Lincoln Trust 



holdings and gave general background information regarding the rec- 
ommended transactions. President Nixon's current wage-price freeze 
lends an uncertainty to future market conditions, but optimistic 
forecasts see a leveling off of the inflation rate to 3-4% with in- 
terest rates fluctuating between 7-87„. Mr. Wood analyzed the specific 
situations affecting the sales and purchases listed. 



Treasurer Johnson distributed a report of the Operating 
Fund Balance as of August 31, 1971, and reported the maturation of a 
$500,000 certificate of deposit at the National Shawmut Bank of 
Boston. It is his intention to place this with the Worcester County 
National Bank for one year at 6%7o interest. He also indicated that 
additional funds will soon be available for placement as certificates 
of deposit for short periods of time in demand accounts. Mr. Brand 
noted that the balance in the interest account fluctuates from 
$700,000 to $4,000,000 through the year. It was the recommendation 
of Mr. Wood that surpluses available in the operating fund be placed 
in certificate of deposits. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute the following 
changes in the University's investment portfolio 
as recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. : 

Sell : 

700 Shares, Continental Can 

440 Shares, Baltimore Gas & Electric 

Buy : 

250 Shares, American Metal Climax, Inc. 
277 Shares, Bankers Trust New York Corporation 
1,300 Shares, National Gypsum 



System Office-- 
g_ Investments, af 
the Endowment 
Fund and the 
Operating Fund 



3780 

Finance Comm. 
9-21-71 

System Office- 
Investments 6f 
the Endowment 
Fund and the 
OperaJ^flg T1 lind 



System Office-- 
Ray E . Heiney , 
Jr. , to Sign 
Checks 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Wood continued his presentation, outlining several 
additional transactions to be negotiated by Treasurer Johnson. 

Following a brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 

Kenneth W. Johnson, to negotiate the sale of 20 
preferred shares of Landmark, Inc. and all of the 
stock of Life Insurance Investors, Inc. (6106.399 sharep) 
as recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 
and to purchase with the proceeds therefrom: 

300 Shares, Honeywell 

200 Shares, Travelers Corporation 

300 Shares, General Foods Corporation 

In recognition of the b roader sphere of activity now est- 
ablished in the Treasurer's Office for the System, President Wood 
indicated his endorsement of Mr. Johnson's request for an additional 
person to sign checks. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize Ray E Heiney, Jr., Assistant Treasurer, 
University of Massachusetts, as directed by the 
Treasurer, or in his absence, to sign or endorse 
in the name of the University of Massachusetts or 
the Board of Trustees of the University of Massa- 
chusetts such official documents, contracts and 
vouchers, including checks, drafts, certificates of 
deposit, letters of credit, advances from the State 
Treasurer and withdrawal orders, as require the 
signature of the financial officer of the University 
provided that all checks, drafts, certificates of 
deposit, letters of credit and withdrawal orders in 
an amount of $10,000 or more shall require the ad- 
ditional signature of either the Treasurer of the 
University, Kenneth W. Johnson, or the Associate 
Treasurer, Robert H. Brand, or Donald W. Cadigan, 
Treasurer's Office. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:35 p.m. 



[f 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary , (Hoard of Trustee" 



[ 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
September 23, 1971, 10:00 a.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 



PRESENT: 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis ; President Wood; Trustees Knowles, Pumphret; 

Treasurer Johnson; Assistant Secretary Harman, Mrs. Holden 

Visiting Trustee: Lee H. Sandwen 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Phillips and Lashman 

From UM/Amherst : Chancellor Tippo; Planning Officer 

Littlefield; Professor Burroughs, repre- 
senting the Faculty Senate; Mr. Ryan, 
Chief Project Engineer; Robert Chiller, 
member of Student Senate 



From UM/Boston: 



Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, Planning Officer O'Brien 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 10:20 a.m. 

Treasurer Johnson reported on the Ohio Land Sale Proposal , 
involving 160 acres of land northeast of Columbus, Ohio, bequeathed 
to the University as part of the Murray D. Lincoln Estate. Although 
it is not on the market, a realtor is preparing an offer from a 
client of $5,000 an acre for a 60-acre tract containing the Lincoln 
home and other buildings, at the same time requesting a 67o commission 
if the sale materializes. Other property in the area already equipped 
with sewer and water installations is bringing considerably higher 
prices. Mr. Johnson plans to go to Ohio in October and will ask 
Mr. P. L. Thornbury, Trustee for the Estate, to secure new appraisals 
at the expense of the Trust to insure that, when the Trustees receive 
other offers, they will be informed on values and developments. 

Reporting for Dean Soutter on the UM/Medical School Con- 
struction , President Wood said that the power plant remains ahead of 
schedule, the renovations on the Shaw Building are essentially com- 
pleted and are very attractive. 



The Medical Science Building is three months behind schedul 
because of problems with concrete. 

Copies of Vice President Phillips' memo on the Governor's 
Captial Outlay budget proposalswere distributed, mention being made 
that it does not include the Teaching Hospital as it is expected that 
the language previously prohibiting contracting for the Teaching 
Hospital until the federal share is received will be removed and pro 
visions substituted that, based on studies done by Treasurer Johnson 
and the Medical School, the building will be self-supporting or will 



373 



Buildings and 
Grounds Comm. 
9-23-71 



Ohio Land Sale 
Proposal 



Medical School 
Progress Report- 
Teaching 
Hospital 



3782 



B&G Comm. 
9623-71 

Medical School 
Progress Repor 
Teaching 
Hospij^^.TTEE 

Medical School 
Land Acquisi- 
tion 

Wigwam Hill 



Herlihy 
Property 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



generate substantial income through federal medical payments. Mr. 
tCass is now preparing a proposal which, it is hoped , will allow 
negotiations to proceed for the hospital. This will be the last 
major requirement of capital outlay for the Medical School. 

On Land Acquisition, UM/Medical School , Treasurer Johnson 
noted that there is a balance on hand of $7,000 in addition to the 
$75,000 provided in the capital outlay budget. He referred to an 
area of Wigwam Hill consisting of 1.2 acres belonging to the City of 
Worcester. This originally consisted of 17 parcels, three of which 
have been withdrawn because of various restrictions. Mr. Gouey of 
the firm of Morrisey, Mahoney and Miller, which was appointed by the 
Attorney General to verify the title, has notified Mr. Johnson that 
the company conducting the search is expected to sign off sometime 
during this week. He has recommended that the Committee proceed 
toward purchase of the property, which the City has voted to sell to 
the University for $4,600, and has prepared a deed to the Commonwealtli 
of Massachusetts for the University. An appraisal is in the 
Treasurer's Office. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 847 of the Acts of 1965, 
items 8066-98, and all other authority pertaining to 
the acquisition of land f o r the University of Massachusetts 
Medical School in Worcester, the offer of the City of 
Worcester to sell certain land in the Wigwam Hill area 
of Worcester to the University for a sum of forty-six 
hundred dollars ($4,600) is hereby accepted and said 
land is hereby purchased, being that contained in a 
plan of the Assessing Department, Worcester, Mass., 
dated 1/1/63 and description thereof from the City 
of Worcester on file in the Office of the Treasurer of 
the University, together with an appraisal thereof 
dated May 21, 1971, by Daniel R. Riordan and Associates. 

Treasurer Johnson next turned to the acquisition of the 
lerlihy property, consisting of two lots on which the University had 
i 90-day option for purchase at $9,000 ($7,800 for the lot with the 
louse, $1,200 for the vacant lot). Due to delay in budget appropri- 
ations, the option expired. Now only Mr. Herlihy has signed the new 
option, with Mrs. Herlihy refusing. However, action by the Com- 
mittee will permit immediate consummation of the sale as soon as the 
appropriation is available if the contract can be negotiated. 



F 



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After confirming that the two appraisals show fair evalua 
Lt was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees, under the 

authority of all acts pertaining to the acquisition 
of land for the University of Massachusetts Medical 
School in Worcester, the purchase of a parcel of land 
with building thereon at 50 Belcourt Road situated in 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



said Worcester on the southerly side of Belcourt Road, 
being designated on the plan of Belgrade Terrace Build- 
ing Sites as Lots No. 272 and 273 recorded with Worcester 
District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 24, Plan 73, and 
that the purchase price is seventy-eight hundred dollars 
($7,800) , appraisals thereof being on file in the Office 
of the Treasurer of the University; and to purchase a 
second parcel of land located at 44 Belcourt Road, being 
Lots No. 274 to 279, both inclusive, shown on Assessors' 
Plan Book 46, page 6, and containing 15,000 square feet, 
more or less, and that the purchase price is twelve 
hundred dollars ($1,200), appraisals thereof being on 
file in the Office of the Treasurer of the University, 
the presumed ox^ners of both parcels being Joseph J. 
Herlihy and Catherine R. Herlihy. 

Chairman Haigis , referring to the number of agenda items, 
commented on the extended interval since the previous meeting. 
President Wood emphasized the importance of the System Office having 
preliminary information and briefing on agenda items for all Trustee 
committee meetings. He urged the cooperation of all campuses. 
Reports and background material form the basis for his and the 
Trustees' capacity to participate in the meetings. The President 
then requested Mr. Littlefield to provide him with the material 
to be presented and to discuss these items in advance. 

Mr. Haigis turned to the request for Approval of the Work- 



ing Drawings for the Infirmary Addition, UM/Amherst . Planning 
Officer Littlefield noted that the original capital outlay request 
was for the entire building, but the project had to be cut back to 
the $1,368,000 appropriated. He referred to negotiations with the 
BBC by Mr. Phillips and Amherst administrators last spring for budget 
clearance (inflationary contingency) and it was also agreed that 
the other three floors originally proposed would be considered as 
a subsequent addition to the existing health services facility 
(not as Phase II of this project). A separate utility contract 
for handling utilities on the building site was also- approved at 
that time. This enabled the architect, Mr. Clancy, to proceed with 
the drawings. Mr. Littlefield has just received working drawings 
and, although they have not been commented on by the Physical Plant, 
they have been making substantial progress reviews. The BBC has 
agreed to proceed as quickly as possible with an anticipated con- 
struction bid of $1,254,000. If the required action takes place in 
minimum time, and barring some significant contingency, the bid can 
be advertised in early November. Chairman Haigis noted that, except 
for the working drawings, the Committee has given this item previous 
approval. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 



3783 



B & G Coram. 
9-23-71 

Medical School 
Land Acquisition 

Herlihy 
Property 



Presidential 
Briefing and 
Advance Support 
Material on All 
Trustee Agenda 
Items 



UM/Amherst-- 

Infirmary 

Addition 

Approval of 
Working Drawings 



3 784 

B & G Comm. 
9-23-71 



UM/Amherst-- 

Infirmary 

Addition 

COMMITTEE 

Approval of 

Working 

Drawings 



Cranberry 
Station, 
Wareham--Land 
Acquisition 



UM/Amherst — 
Gift of 
Property, 
Fraternity- 
Sorority Park 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 

of the working drawings of Project U68-3 Addition 
to Health Services Building at an anticipated 
construction bid of $1,254,000. 

Note: Should some comment of a significant nature be re- 
quired by Physical Plant's final review, this will 
be reported to the Trustees for appropriate action. 

President Wood abstained on procedural grounds. 

The Committee next turned to consideration of Land Ac- 
quistion at the Cranberry Station, Wareham . Treasurer Johnson 



r 



distributed a sketch of the area delineating the 1.2-acre lot being 
offered to the University for $4,000. This land is adjacent to the 
cranberry bog and is the source of sand for sanding the bog. He 
stated that Dr. Spielman, Director of the Experiment Station, 
UM/Amherst, has obtained federal Hatch funds for this specific 
transaction. However, the use of these funds requires a restrictive 
clause in the deed to read: "to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
for the use and benefit of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 
Station, University of Massachusetts. 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Trustees acquire for the use of the Massachusetts 
Experimental Station in East Wareham a parcel of 
land owned by Joseph Arooth, presumed owner, con- 
taining approximately 1.2 acres of land. lying adjacent 
to the Cranberry Experimental Station Bog described 
as Lot No. 1030 on the Wareham 1 s Assessors' Map 
No. 129 and is east of Glen Charlie Road near Pine 
Lake, said land to be paid for from Federal Ex- 
perimental Station funds--Hatch Fund Account No. 
007079 for the negotiated sale price of four 
thousand dollars ($4,000) , appraisal thereof being 
on file in the Office of the -Treasurer of the 
University. 

The Treasurer also reported receipt by the University of 
the gift of 14 acres of land containing a house at Fraternity- 
Sorority Park, UM/Amherst, previously discussed at the Executive 
Committee meeting of April 7, 1971. The Building Authority has 
acquired the additional eight acres for future expansion of the 
University housing program. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the Road Report , 
field, a member of the Traffi 
in cooperation with the Town 
Works, plans are in progress 
traffic in two or three years 
Selectmen expect to turn the 
circumferential road will pas 
from Commonwealth Avenue at B 
North Pleasant Street, across 
across the Tillson Corridor, 
railroad track and down hill 



UM/Amherst , Planning Officer Little- 



c Circulation Committee, stated that, 

of Amherst and the Department of Public 

to close North Pleasant Street to 

, subsequent to which the Amherst 

title over to the University. The 

s through University property starting 

oyden, looping north and east to 

to East Pleasant Street, easterly 
and then onto town land along the 
to Northeast and Main Streets. 



Subject to federal funding, the DPW has agreed to take on 
this project in three phases over approximately an eight-year 
period. The Traffic Circulation Committee has agreed to continue 
service in an advisory capacity and as a liaison between the DPW, 
the University, and the town. 

Assuming approval at the October 4 town meeting, Mr. 
Littlefield anticipates a public hearing to be held by the DPW 
and federal officials on all stages of the road during the winter, 
followed by an environmental review. It was emphasized that there 
is no University funding required and that plans for landscaping 
along North Pleasant Street must wait until title is received. 

Concerning the South Deerfield Project, USDA-College of 
Agriculture , Mr. Littlefield reported that he has received a re- 
quest from the Experiment Station for a research project involving 
rural modular buildings which can be assembled and disassembled with 
unskilled labor. Basically, this is to provide inexpensive and 
relocatable housing for rural families. The project is funded as 
part of the institutional grant awarded the Experiment Station and 
has received federal approval. Treasurer Johnson has confirmed 
that no building permit is necessary. However, the Town of South 
Deerfield and the Trustees should be informed of the details of 
the project. 

Mr. Littlefield displayed a map of the South Deerfield 
property and pointed out the proposed location on Hillside Road. 
The scope of the project is to design the house within the Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Engineering, to erect, and live in it for a 
year and then assess the quality. If the dwelling proves satis- 
factory and sufficiently attractive, a request may come back 
later to disassemble it and move it to a location near the South 
Deerfield Project where it could serve as a farm management house. 

The Committee next turned to the Modular Buildings — Pro- 
gress Report . Mr. Littlefield stated that five bids have been re- 
ceived, ranging from $860,000 to $1,400,000, for a total of the four 
projects, not including interior partitioning, foundations, and 
site development. The bids are being reviewed and evaluated by 
Barnes and Jarvis. Mr. Littlefield displayed architect's drawings 
submitted by the lowest apparent bidder, Barnstrator Engineering 

Company, and described in detail the layout of the buildings pro- 
posed. Emphasis was placed on the need for appropriate landscaping; 
also, that the interior layout is completely flexible, except in the 



378i 



tj 



B & G Comm. 
9-23-71 

UM/Amherst- - 
Road Report 



UM/Amherst-- 
South Deerfield 
Project--USDA 
College of 
Agriculture 



UM/Amherst-- 
Modular 
Buildings 
Progress Report 






3786 



B & G Comm. 
9-23-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Modular Build- 
ings Progress 
Report 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst -- 
Convocation 
Center--Status 
Report 



UM/Amherst-- 
Parking Plans, 
Long Range 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mental Health Facility, 
were also reviewed. 



Layouts submitted by the other bidders 



Chairman Haigis stressed that, although the present in- 
tention is to provide temporary space, the modular buildings may 
have long-range usage and should receive careful consideration. 
President Wood requested that the Committee be provided with a re- 
port on costs and other comparisons for their review and study. 

Chairman Haigis then introduced the Convocation Center- 
Status Report, UM/ Amherst . Although increasing need for such a 



UM/ Amherst — 
Landscaping-- 
Five-year Plan 



structure is recognized, it was agreed that action should be 
delayed until the Campus Center experience has been resolved. 
Trustee-.Pumphret stated his opposition to the self- liquidating ap- 
proach and urged a straightforward look at the facilities to be 
provided. However, the Center is not a priority item at the present 
time. 

Regarding Long-range Parking plans, Planning Officer 
Littlefield stated that the Faculty Senate, employee groups, and 
various other groups at UM/ Amherst last spring started reviewing an 
initial Parking Fee Proposal to provide parking services that would 
be relatively comparable but with an income differential range of 
fees. The Parking Committee (Amherst) submitted a similar plan to 
the administration, the only difference being the revenue yield 
and level of services provided. During the summer, a proposal was 
submitted to the Department of Transportation for a grant based on 
a service-oriented plan providing a schedule of fees for reserved- 
space parking and a range of parking services, including a per- 
ipheral lot served by a shuttle bus. The fees would be used to 
provide services and security as well as the bus system. 

An Ad Hoc Faculty Senate Committee, the Parking Committee, 
and the Master Planning Committee are now attempting to work out 
the basic elements of a balanced transportation system--the traffic 
ramifications, the commuter traffic within the surrounding communities 
the land area to be committed for surface parking, the various 
services to be provided, the core area needed for parking, the Campus 
Center garage, etc. The Planning Office has provided background in- 
formation to these groups. With 407o of the students commuting, 
there must be strict enforcement of parking regulations with limited 
mobility on campus. Trustee Pumphret emphasized the Committee's 
responsibility for developing equitable parking rules and their en- 
forcement. Replying to Dr. Wood's question on use of the Parking 
Garage, Mr. Littlefield stated that, as long as the current re- 
gistration fee of $1.00 is the only charge for surface parking on 
campus, the garage will not be filled. 

Chairman Haigis introduced the item, Landscaping- -Five-year 
Plan, UM/Amherst . He expressed concern that landscaping for many of 
the new buildings has suffered. Mr. Littlefield stated that the 
work has been done as money has become available, but that the 
escalation of building construction costs on campus has, in some 
cases, seriously reduced or completely eliminated landscaping from 
project budgets. The Committee agreed that roads and parking may be 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

higher priority items, but that landscaping should not be forgotten 
and the upkeep of sites already planted should not be neglected. 

Regarding location of the Life Sciences Building, UM/ Amherst , 
Mr. Littlefield reported that, with growth of UM/ Amherst now 
limited to 25,000, the building will have to be reprogrammed and 
relocated. It may also be necessary to move functions out of the 
building. 

Discussion next turned to UM/Boston, Possible Changes in 
Columbia Point Campus . Mr. Haigis expressed concern that the 
Trustees have not kept in close contact with UM/Boston, which 
started as a commuter campus for six colleges that are relatively 
autonomous . 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton distributed two progress reports: 
one on physical construction and the other on the budget (Doc. T72 - 
007 ) . He stated that, although the Bureau of Building Construction 
still expects to open the Columbia Point campus in September, 1973, 
the schedule is very tight and a revision of timetables may be re- 
quested by April or May, 1972. The project consultants (MBM) have 
indicated that there are certain building techniques which may 
speed up the work and have agreed to begin submitting construction 
schedules in October. President Wood requested Vice President 
Philli; s and Vice Chancellor Hamilton to make an administrative 
review of the situation and report back to him. Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton recommended that the Trustees require the BBC and the MBM 
to meet the September, 1973, termination date. Chairman Haigis 
offered to have the Committee meet with representatives of the BBC 
and the MBM to review the commitment. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton then reviewed the Phase I 
Columbia Point budget, indicating a reduction from the initial 
budget approved by the Trustees at $149,400,000 to $134,300,000 at 
the present time. Appropriations total only $133,400,000. It will 
be necessary to cut or defer certain expenditures of about $500,000 
in order to complete Phase I within the limit of funds available. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton also reported that the MBTA is 
using a Department of Transportation grant of $50,000 to study the 
problem of providing suitable public transportation for UM/Boston 
campuses. Mr. O'Brien predicted that two-thirds of the students 
will need these facilities, with the remaining one-third using 
private cars. 

President Wood noted two other dimensions which must be 
considered in UM/Boston planning: first, the affirmative action 
program and, second, contracts dealing with residents of Columbia 
Point. His position, as well as that of the UM/Boston Chancellor and 
Vice Chancellor, in the absence of a definitive public statement on 
what the University can and cannot do in relationship to its 



378? 



B & G Coram. 
9-23-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Landscaping-- 
Five-year Plan 

UM/ Amherst- - 
Life Science 
Building 
Location 

UM/Boston 
Possible Changes 
in Philosophy, 
Columbia Point 
Campus 



UM/Boston — 
Progress Report, 
Columbia Point 



3788 



B & G Comm. 
9-23-71 

UM/Boston 
Progress Repor 
Columbia Point 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

neighboring communities, has been to maintain a strong affirmative 
action program and to continue efforts to cooperate and develop 
staff capability to work out the problems as they arise. Chancellor 
Broderick's address at the Dorchester Board of Trade was well re- 
ceived and affirmed the University's willingness to cooperate with 
its neighbors in providing a vehicle for mutual self-help in the 
employment field by establishing a separate corporate entity. 

Chancellor Broderick, who had recently arrived, continued 
the report for UM/Boston and expressed concern that their 1972 
budget request for $55,000,000 has been cut to $11,000,000. 
Priorities are in the process of being established. As soon as a 
program for the year is determined, he will report back to the Com- 
mittee. He emphasized that there is no doubt about the buildings 
now going up and that the collegiate structure of UM/Boston is firm 
and is now proceeding with the division of departments between 
College I and II to be effective January 31, 1972. Dr. Wood then 
assured the Committee that the Governor's action in cutting the 
budget reflects solely the current economic status of the Common- 
wealth. 

Chairman Haigis read a brief statement from Trustee Knowles 
who had left the meeting earlier affirming that the primary role of 
the University at Columbia Point is dedicated to education and that 
the campus must maintain a firm middle-of-the road position in its 
community relationships. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 



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Robert J. /McCartney 
Secretary^ Board of Trustfe 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
September 28, 1971, 9:30 a.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Pumphret, Rowland!, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Assistant 
Secretary Harman. 

Visiting Trustee : Lee H. Sand-wen 

Administration, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice Presidents Phillips and Lashman, 

Mr. Cass, Austin Broadhurst, Mrs. 
Nan Robinson. 



From UM/ Amherst: 



From UM/Boston: 



Chancellor Tippo, Provost Gluckstern, 
Vice Chancellors Bromery and Campion, 
Mr. Clay; Messrs. Grinnan, Nims , 
Scanlon, Professor Burroughs, represent- 
ing the Faculty Senate. 

Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton. 



From UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell 



Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. 

President Wood introduced a new member of his staff, 
Mrs. Nan Robinson, who has been functioning in addition to other 
duties, as liasion with the Future University Committee. 

Chairman Healey extended a welcome to the new student 
Trustee from UM/Amherst, Mr. Lee Sandwen. 

The President commented that the revised draft of the 
Future University Committee Report now being sent to the Trustees, 
and assuming the Committee's unanimity, will be very close to the 
final recommendations of that group. 

Highlights of the report will be presented by Messrs. 
Alden and Edelman at the Blantyre conference next week. An op- 
portunity for Trustee reaction has been structured into the program 
on the same day. The President emphasized that the report is 
essentially that of the Future Committee and there is no implication 
that the President or the Trustees are committed to it. 

The President next turned to the first agenda item, 
Fiscal Year 1972 Maintenance Budget . Dr. Wood explained that the 
budget document, distributed to the Committee and the President's 
Council this weekend, represents a summation with one-quarter of 
the fiscal year expired. Also, the timing reflects the late 



3789 



Future 
University 
Committee 
Report 



Fiscal Year 
1972 

Maintenance 
Budget 



3790 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 



COMMITTEE 

1972 Fiscal 
Year 

Operating 
Budget 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



enactment of the appropriation by the legislature; further, it 
represents a partial reorganization and reform of the approach to 
budget presentations. He thanked all the staffs involved on the 
campuses, and that of the Treasurer's Office for their diligent 
work in preparing the document. 

The President singled out the Amherst budget for particular 
commendation in terms of its new approach through identification of 
cost centers. The President's Office is not the operating manager 
of the budgets, he said, but it is through the budgets that the 
President and the Board of Trustees influence the growth of the 
University. 

The President continued that the UM/Boston budget did 
not accede in all ways to Chancellor Broderick's trust fund re- 
quests, and his high priority library requests still go unfulfilled. 
The adoption of the UM/Boston budget is recommended. 

The President termed the UM/Worcester - Medical School 
budget "the most pliable". The adoption of this budget is re- 
commended . 

The UM/Amherst budget represents the greatest amount of 
innovation, and provided the President, he said, with the greatest 
amount of difficulty. 

The President regards the Amherst budget from two per- 
spectives: first, as a policy document that describes program 
emphasis and flexibility while relating new programs to resources; 
secondly, as a formal document which tracks those resources from 
their source to their expenditure in sufficient detail so that the 
President and the Trustees may identify the use of funds. 

Dr. Wood noted that the first three pages of the UM/Amherst 
documents cite directions for the balance of the year which are 
truly laudable. At the same time, a statement of priorities is not 
given and there is not sufficient indication of the relative amount 
of resources to be expended. The President found inappropriate the 
use of the terms "profit and loss" in the budget document of a 
public institution. 

President Wood has also expressed his concern to Chancellor 
Tippo and Mr. Clay concerning the dispersal pattern of the institu- 
tional allowance account for contingency purposes of $265,000. Con- 
cern was also expressed about accepting as a budgeting basis for 
the balance of the fiscal year a deficit budget based on transfers 
from the 01 account, as detailed on page 10 of the document. 
Further details have been requested of the Chancellor concerning the 
deficits in the 01 and 03 accounts and of the anticipated use of 
these funds. 

The President continued by noting that the UM/Amherst 
budget listing of Bankhead- Jones , Morrill-Nelson and Land Grant Fundi 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

called for expenditures on books, periodicals and equipment which 
are system-wide in nature. These same funds are reflected in 
different pages of the System Budget (from pages 11 to 18) as items 
to be held in reserve for contingency purposes at the level of the 
Board and the President. It was stressed that these are not operat- 
ing funds; also, that the capacity of the Trustees and the President 
to look at priorities and maintain some flexibility is very impor- 
tant. 

The President then requested the Committee to approve 
the budgets, including trust fund budgets, as detailed in Document 
T72-004 for the System, for UM/Boston, and for UM/Worcester. 



The UM/ Amherst budget is to continue on the basis of 
monthly review, as approved by the Board in June, 1971, with the 
hopeful expectation that it may be ready for full approval by the 
Board of Trustees on October 7, 1971, at Lenox. 

In response to query from Trustee Troy, the President 
indicated that points requiring further detail and clarification 
in the UM/Amherst budget were on page 10 (the running of negative 
balances in the reserve account); on page 13, (the establishment of 
multiple contingency allocations which the President did not feel 
represented a budget); also, on Schedule IV, which attempts to 
relate allocable funds by establishment of cost centers. In the 
latter case, there is no breakdown of program activity by non-state 
account as is detailed in the budgets of the other campuses. 

The President praised the new direction taken by the re- 
vised UM/Amherst budget format, and pointed out that the problems 
he has identified are near resolution. The new format, incidentally, 
will provide the extensive detail which the Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy has requested: for example, number of students 
to faculty member, number of contact hours per academic staff 
member, etc. 

Chairman Healey next called for any comment or objections 
to the budgets of the System Office, UM/Bostan, and UM/Worcester. 
None were received, and it was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the operating budget for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1972, for the System Administration, 
as detailed in Document T-72-004 . 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they ap- 
prove the operating budget for the University of 
Massachusetts/Boston, as detailed in Document 
T72-004 . 

It was further 



3791 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 

1972 FY 

Operating 

Budget 



3792 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 

1972 FY 

Operating 

Budget 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the operating budget for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1972 for the University Medical 
School as detailed in Document T72-004 . 

Chairman Healey called on Chancellor Tippo for comment. 

Dr. Tippo stated that UM/ Amherst had been endeavoring for 
some time to develop a budget approach which would reflect all 
sources of income including trust funds and the Bankhead- Jones , 
Morrill-Nelson and Land Grant monies. The present budget pre- 
sentation has achieved this. 

With reference to proposed expenditures, Chancellor Tippo 
said, the UM/ Amherst budget has shown the distribution of all state 
funds in the 01 to 16 account categories. Further, the budget shows 
graduate and undergraduate enrollment, the contact hours of teaching 
by division, the number of faculty, number of staff and full-time 
equivalent ratio between students and faculty, average teaching 
loads , average salaries, percentage of resources devoted to in- 
struction, status of the various reserves and the status of various 
accounts. 

The Chancellor said that the area of alumni and development 
had been deliberately left out, since it required a great deal more 
attention prior to making allocations of funds. Service funds of 
certain departments and schools have been omitted, and a total of 
non-state funds was assigned to the Graduate School. Actually, 
the sum is less than that allocated last year. 

The budget policy statement does indicate priorities for 
allocation of funds in the academic area, Chancellor Tippo said. 
More funds are earmarked for the residential colleges, for the 
honors program and for evaluation and improvement of teaching. 

In the student affairs area, more support is provided for 
security. In administration, a budget officer and certain other 
positions are requested. 

The Chancellor reported- that the state demanded $1,000,000 
in savings this year (as against $600,000 last year) for unfilled 
positions. Additionally, the year begins with a $600,000 deficit 
in the utilities account. 

The Chancellor noted that support per student had dropped 
about 57o and financial aid about 9%7o. In addition, he said, the 
President's Office has asked for a transfer of some funds to the 
System Office; about $450,000 in various categories, with a backup 
arrangement for an additional $150,000. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



!J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Tippo felt that the UM/ Amherst budget cuts 
were fairly drastic. He stressed the transfer of $35,000 in the 

10 (travel) account to the System Office, stating that this repre- 
sented one-sixth of all travel monies available to the UM/ Amherst 
campus. This would leave about $50 per faculty member for travel 
to scientific and scholarly meetings, he said. In account 14, 
covering telephone servies, the Chancellor continued, the System 
Office requires $40,000. Prior to transfer of this amount, UM/ 
Amherst will begin the fiscal year with $11,000 less in the 14 account 
so that the aggregate represents a substantial reduction. Similarly, 
$40,000 is requested for transfer in the - 15 account (equipment). 
Chancellor Tippo stated that this represents the total amount re- 
quired to provide furniture for new faculty members. 

Additionally, Dr. Tippo said, the System Office has re- 
quested $75,000 of trust fund interest money from UM/Amherst, to 
be supplemented by $100,000 in a reserve, for a total of $175,000. 

Dr. Tippo stated further that approximately $90,000 is 
requested for transfer from Bankhead- Jones , Morrill-Nelson and 
Land Grant funds, for a total deduction of funds from UM/Amherst 
of $865,000. 

Trustee Pumphret queried whether fewer trust funds would 
be available on the UM/Amherst campus for the current fiscal year 
in contrast to 1971, as a result of the above-mentioned transfers. 
Mr. Clay responded affirmatively on the Bankhead- Jones , Morrill- 
Nelson funds, but was uncertain with respect to trust fund interest. 

Trustee Troy queried whether any of the money placed in 
reserve could be returned. President Wood responded affirmatively, 
indicating that all of it could. The President pointed out that 
his office is not an operating office and it is not performing 
functions separate from other educational functions on the Amherst 
campus. So the transfer of the reserve account represents an 
opportunity to apply flexibility in funding such items as equipment 
and library books. On the contingency fund item, the question is 
whether the sums repose initially with the President's Office or 
initially with the Chancellors. Dr. Wood added that the concept of 
whether the funds are available initially to the faculty for educa- 
tional activity is not at issue. 

Chancellor Tippo continued that, because of the transfers 
and diminished allocations, page 10 of the Amherst budget lists 
the transfers anticipated as necessary to move forward. He pointed 
out that the Trustees had requested some advance indication of what 
transfers might be necessary at the outset of a fiscal year, rather 
than bringing such requests to the Board at a later time. 

Trustee Pumphret queried how the projected transfer of 
01 funds compared with what has been done in the past. Mr. Clay re- 
sponded that the percentage actually declines this year. There is an 
important departure, he continued, in that some of the transfers are 
earmarked for other subsidiary accounts than the 03 account. 



3793 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 

1972 FY 

Operating 

Budget 



3794 

Exec Comm. 
9-28-71 

1972 FY 

Operating 

Budget 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

As to the creation of a $100,000 reserve fund from trust 
fund interest, Treasurer Johnson pointed out that such a reserve 
has always existed. 

Chairman Healey queried what would be different this 
year in personnel and activity in the System Office. The President 
responded that his July memorandum had detailed the basic organi- 
zational changes. Included are development at the System level of 
a policy analysis staff and a budget capability. The President 
stressed that assistance with budgets was needed in the System 
Office as well as on the Amherst campus. 

President Wood added that the currently proposed FY 1972 
budget provided the President and the Trustees, in the remaining 
months of the fiscal year, with an opportunity to support particular 
parts of program innovations and to hear requests from the three 
campuses. The effect is that the President's Office will have an 
allocative but not an operational capability vis-a-vis the campuses. 
Also, Dr. Wood pointed out, the new budget disentangles what had 
been a common, pooled operation based on the Amherst campus in 
times past when the President came to operating decisions without 
the Chancellors. It is now important that the segregation of funds 
be clearly delineated so that the Chancellors' responsibilities and 
the President's responsibilities can be pinpointed. 

The President said that he was not prepared to accept a 
budget which proposes a deficit without knowing about the character 
of those deficits. Further, he does not agree with the plan for 
disbursement of contingency funds for innovations down to the point 
of $1,000. At that level, he said, there is no innovation which 
can make real impact. i 

Chancellor Tippo then requested that the Vice Chancellors 
be heard on the effect of carrying over the UM/ Amherst budget on a 
month-to-month basis. President Wood took exception to this pro- 
cedure on the procedural ground that the President should have the 
opportunity to hear the Vice Chancellors' particular concerns prior 
to discussion in committee meetings or at least be informed by the 
Chancellor of his plan of presentation. 

After discussion, the chair ruled that--in view of the 
fact that the Vice Chancellors were already present--and as an 
exceptional procedure, they might be heard. 

Chancellor Tippo then urged that the state budget and the 
auxiliary enterprise budget be approved for UM/ Amherst. Treasurer 
Johnson responded that there had not been sufficient time, since 
the UM/ Amherst budget was presented over a weekend to analyze the 
document and advise the President whether the figures tied together. 
There had been a change of figures from an earlier analysis which 
had been made. With regard to state funds, on page 25 of the 
UM/ Amherst document, a deficit of $725,000 remains, he said, even 
after the anticipated transfers are made. Mr. Clay responded that 
this matter is specifically discussed on pages 10 and 11 of the 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

document. In essence, Mr. Clay said, the budget was drawn on the 
basis of contingencies which he could not be certain would material- 
ize (for example, merit increases and others) and if all of the 
contingencies should go against the campus, then this would bring 
the budget into a small surplus, exclusive of utilities. 

Chairman Healey expressed his awareness that all con- 
cerned had been working under tremendous pressure. First, there 
was the late appropriation. Secondly, there was the change in the 
budget format itself which he termed a "tremendous improvement." 
The Chairman noted that the UM/ Amherst budget obviously represents 
much greater complexity and difficulty. In view of this, he felt 
that the Trustees were not ready to act on it. At the same time, 
since the Vice Chancellors were present, and recognizing that 
normal administrative procedure would call for them to report their 
views through the Chancellor, he felt their remarks would be infor- 
mative for the Trustees. With the assent of President Wood, they 
were invited to comment. 

Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services Campion 
spoke briefly on the budgets for auxiliary enterprises: food 
services, dormitories, Campus Center, and residence hall trust 
funds. In each case, he said, these budgets at least break even 
and in many cases make a contribution to reserve and surplus. In 
the case of the Campus Center (exclusive of the garage) the amount 
was $50,700; in the case of the Residence Hall Trust Fund, ap- 
proximately $200,000; the same amount also for Building Authority 
projects taken altogether. In the case of the dining commons, at 
least a $180,000 contribution is made to the reduction of current 
deficits. 

Trustee Pumphret queried whether the exhibit on page 55 
of the Amherst budget showed a deficit. Mr. Campion responded 
that the page reflected an accrual deficit. 

Mr. Pumphret pointed out that, under the Dormitories 
items, the professional staff had risen from 9.5 to 22.7. Mr. 
Campion said that this is due to the setting up of Business 
Managers and their staffs working with students in the several 
residence hall areas. 

Provost Gluckstern commented that a number of expenses 
including equipment purchases had to be deferred in the academic 
area. He anticipates, if the budget is not approved, that parts 
of the academic program may have to be deferred or canceled. 

Vice Chancellor Bromery indicated that his main problem 
lay in the reorganization of the Student Affairs area, with partic- 
ular emphasis on security. 

President Wood moved the votes. Chairman Healey, with 
the understanding that hardship cases would be accommodated under 
the one-twelfth continuance policy, supported the President. 



3795 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 

1972 FY 

Operating 

Budget 



3796 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 

1972 FY 
Operating 

Budget 

COMMITTEE 



Merit Increase 
Policy, 1972 



Transfer by 
Purchase of 
Student Union 
Building from 
University 
Building 
Association to 
University 
Building 
Authority 



UM/ Amherst — 
Rathskeller; 
Campus Center 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, until 
the Operating Budget for the Fiscal Year 1972 
for UM/ Amherst is accepted and approved by the 
President and the Board of Trustees, the com- 
mitment and disbursement of state and trust 
funds for educational and other programs on the 
UM/ Amherst campus shall not exeed on a monthly 
basis one-twelfth of the annual budget approved 
for the UM/ Amherst campus of Fiscal Year 1971. 

Chairman Healey next turned to the second System Office 
agenda item, Merit Increase Policy, 1972 . In view of the time 
limits, this discussion item was deferred in favor of considering 
UM/Amherst campus items requiring action. 

The Chairman next turned to UM/Amherst agenda item one, 
Transfer by Purchase of Student Union Building from University 



Building Association to University Building Authority . A memorandum 
from Mr. Broadhurst entitled "The Campus Center and the Student 
Union Building," dated September 23, was distributed. Doc. T72-008 . 

Mr. Broadhurst commented that Chapter 594, Acts of 1971, 
permits the University to get rid of a series of legal problems. 
He reminded the Committee that the Student Union Building, pre- 
sently a part of the Campus Center, is owned by the old University 
Building Association. The Campus Center building and the parking 
garage stand partially on land leased from that same Association. 

Chapter 594 allows the Building Association to sell the 
Student Union building to the Commonxvealth, and the Commonwealth 
to sell the building at the same price to the University Building 
Authority. 

This matter has been appproved by the University Building 
Association, by the University Building Authority, and Mr. Broadhurst 
has had clearance from the Attorney General's Office. If approved 
by the Trustees at their meeting in Lenox on October 7, the deal 
will be closed on October 14. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
carry out the authorizations provided to them 
by Chapter 594 of the Acts of 1971, with re- 
spect to the sale and transfer of the Student 
Union building from the University Building 
Association to the University Building Authority. 

The next item was the Rathskeller--Campus Center . 
Vice Chancellor Campion was requested to comment. 



COMMITTEE 



3 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Campion, noting that the members of the Committee 
had received a memorandum on this subject, listed five points: 

1. There is much student support for the idea of establishing 
a Rathskeller in the Campus Center. 

2. The operation of the Rathskeller is an extension of the 
Top of the Campus which the students regard as too small. 

3. There is unanimous approval for the project among the 
Student Union Governing Board, Messrs. Campion, Scanlon, and 
Grinnan. 

4. No one under 21 years of age will be served. The 
entire operation will be conducted within the framework of 
the laws of the Commonwealth concerning sale and dispensing 
of alcoholic beverages. 

5. A look ahead at the projected financial situation shows 
that a small but significant profit may materialize. 

Chairman Healey inquired how identification might be 
established as to eligibility to purchase alcoholic beverages. 
Mr. Campion said, on a normal night, identification cards must be 
shown. On weekends, when entertainment is made available, 
21-year-olds will be seated on one side of a barrier where liquor 
will be served and those under 21 will be restricted to the other 
side. In response to query from Chairman Healey, Mr. Scanlon 
responded that a Top of the Campus card would be required for 
service at all times. 

Trustee Pumphret quoted an article in the Collegian 
to the effect that beer is already being served on some occasions 
in downstairs floors of the Campus Center despite a Trustee vote 
prohibiting such activity. Mr. Grinnan responded that such sales 
take place only on an "ad hoc" basis, that is, in relation to a 
specific event. What is requested now is Trustee approval for 
the establishment of a permanent Rathskeller. 

Faculty Senate representative Burroughs indicated that the 
Faculty Senate was in favor of the plan. President Wood commented 
that the Amherst business community no longer viewed the Campus 
Center as a competitive operation , but as one that is generally 
good for area business. Chairman Healey stressed that the 
Rathskeller would be an extension of an activity already underway, 
and he assumes that the faculty are also welcome. 

After brief further discussion on a motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that-- 

WHEREAS : The Boar <j f Trustees on September 14, 
1970, voted: "No 'Rathskeller' operation shall 
be undertaken for the sale of beer, wine, or 
other alcoholic beverages, as licensed by the 



379? 



Exec, Coram. 
9-28-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Rathskeller ; 
Campus Center 



3798 



Exec. Coram. 
9-28-71 

UM/Amherst — 
Rathskeller 
Campus Center 

COMMITTEE 



System Office- 
Merit 
Increase 
Policy--1972 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission, without 
specific vote of authorization by the Board of 
Trustees of the University," and 

WHEREAS : the Student Union Governing Board 
has reviewed and approved the proposition of 
a Rathskeller, finding it desirable to en- 
hance the social life of the campus community 
and the Top of the Campus, Inc. Corporation 
has similarly received and approved the pro- 
position of a Rathskeller in the Campus 
Center; and 

WHEREAS : the management of the Campus Center 
has determined that such an operation is eco- 
nomically feasible; 

THEREFORE , a Rathskeller shall be established 
and operated in the Campus Center within the 
sole limits of the area designated on the license 
on file with the Selectmen of the Town of Amherst 
as "0203 Dining Room." Further, alcoholic 
beverages shall be sold in said Rathskeller by 
Top of the Campus, Inc., and in total compliance 
with the by-laws of said Corporation, and with 
state and local statutes, rules, and regulations 
pertaining to the storage, sale of, and dis- 
pensing of alcoholic beverages and with the rules 
and regulations promulgated and to be promulgated 
by the Board of Trustees of the University. 

President Wood requested the Chairman to reintroduce item 
two under the System Office, Merit Increase Policy, 1972 . The 
administration has noted, he said, Trustee concern the last time 
merit and cost-of-living increases coincided last year. Sub- 
sequently, Chancellor Broderick proposed a merit award formula. 
The quantity and amount of merit increases has been discussed at 
several President's Council meetings, and will be discussed again 
today . 

Treasurer Johnson has prepared a memorandum on this subject 
He stated that an annual problem is the coincidence of timing be- 
tween the award of merit increments and the award of the cost-of- 
living salary adjustment. He pointed out that the annual cost-of 
living increment has to be voted annually by the Legislature after 
recommendation by the Governor. By the time payments are made, 
the date of receipt often falls into the spring. 

After brief further discussion, President Wood indicated 
that the Johnson memorandum would be distributed to the Trustees 
and further comments solicited. 



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1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey stressed that, while he has been an 
advocate of salary increases, the University "may be headed for 
deep trouble in this area" with the pyramiding of merit increments 
on cost-of-living adjustments. 

Mr. Johnson queried whether moving the effective date of 
merit increments back to September 1 would alleviate the problem. 
Mr. Healey responded that his concern is for the "fundamentals": 
the addition of one increment on top of another on an existing high 
salary base. It is this problem which has raised the greatest 
criticism at the state level. 

President Wood requested that the Committee go into exec- 
utive session for the purpose of considering further information on 
honorary degrees. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 
of considering honorary degrees. 

After appropriate discussion, the Committee came out of 
executive session for the purpose of adjournment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:05 a.m. 



3799 



Exec. Comm. 
9-28-71 

System Office-- 
Merit Increase 
Policy-- 
1972 




Robert J 

Secretary ^Board of Trustees 



U 



3800 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY & EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
October 7, 1971, 11:45 a.m., Blantyre Castle, Lenox, Massachusetts 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff: 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Change of 
Name from 
Department of 
Government to 
Department of 
Political 
Science 



Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustee Shaler; Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Holden, recorder. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Troy at 11:45 



a .m. 



President Wood presented the request from the Amherst 
campus that the name of the Department of Government be changed to 
the Department of Political Science. There was brief discussion. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

title of the Department of Government, UM/Amherst, 
be changed to the Department of Political Science, 
UM/Amherst. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, /Byoard of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 7, 1971, 4:00 p.m., Blantyre Room, Blantyre Castle, Lenox, MA 



PRESENT: 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Abrams , Boyden, 
Carman, Chandler, Croce, Crowley, Gordon, Haigis, Howes, 
Lamb son, Pumphret, Rowland, Sandwen, Shaler, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Holden, record 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

From System Office : Vice President Phillips, Mr. Broad- 
hurst, Special Assistant Harman, 
Miss Pugh 



sr 



From UM/ Amherst: 



Vice Chancellor for Faculty Affairs and 
Provost Gluckstern; Professor Burroughs, 
representing the Faculty Senate; Mrs. 
Ross, representing the Graduate Student 
Senate; Mr. Ladd, representing the 
Student Senate. 



4:35 p.m. 



From UM/Boston: Chancellor Broderick 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



Mr. Healey opened the meeting to general discussion, 
comments, and suggestions from anyone present on the appointment of 
a Search Committee to fill the position of Chancellor at UM/ Amherst. 

Professor Burroughs explained the basis for the Faculty 
Senate's action in establishing an Ad Hoc Search Committee, refer- 
ring to a current directive dated May 6, 1970, "Faculty Participation 
in University Government," which had been approved in principle by 
the Trustees on April 22, 1970 (Doc. T70-062A ) . Chancellor Tippo 
had placed the provisions of this document into effect on the 
Amherst campus. Professor Burroughs quoted the first sentence of 
paragraph six of the document referring specifically to the appoint- 
ment of a "major administrative officer." 

Responding to Mrs. Rowland's question on legal responsi- 
bilities, Mr. Healey stated that section six refers -to appointments 
by the Chancellor rather than of the Chancellor. Professor 
Burroughs emphasized the importance of significant faculty and student 
participation at this time, referring to "low morale and a feeling 
of alienation currently prevailing on the Amherst campus." Mr. Ladd 
observed that lengthy negotiations by faculty and students had 
taken place with significant compromises on all sides in developing 
the proposal. He urged strong involvement by the student body. 



3801 



UM/Amherst-- 
Search Committee 
for a Chancellor 



3802 



Exec. Comm. 
10-7-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Search Com- 
mittee for a 
Chancellor 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey objected that the proposal, as presented, 
would remove selection process from the Board of Trustees, giving 
them, in effect, only a veto power over the single name proposed 
by the Search Committee. There would be no latitude for evaluation 
of several candidates. Mr. Broadhurst supported Mr. Healey' s 
contention that this would be a violation of the General Laws 
respecting the powers of the Trustees in appointments of this rank. 

Mr. Gordon said that the proposed procedure could lead to 
presentation of nominees over a period of several months. He 
questioned what would happen if a student on the committee graduated 
or left the University. 

Mr. Pumphret declared that the method proposed would give 
the Trustees no choice in filling the position, since they would 
receive only a single name. He stressed the efficiency of the 
Presidential Search Committee, composed of faculty, students, and 
alumni, which had proposed seven or eight names in a relatively 
short time. Mrs. Ross urged that the committee under consideration 
be composed of members affiliated with the Amherst campus, since 
that is the University unit immediately concerned. 

Chairman Healey said that the issues were twofold: 
(1) that paragraph six of the UM/ Amherst governance document does 
not apply to the position of Chancellor, and (2) that the statutes 
of the Commonwealth require the Board to provide for full considera- 
tion of all eligible candidates. Professor Burroughs reiterated 
that his primary concern is that faculty and students must have a 
significant part in the choice. Mr. Healey assured the Amherst 
campus representatives that the expertise of people on that campus 
will be invaluable. He objects only to putting the Board "in a 
straitjacket. " 

Discussion then turned to the number of names the Committee 
would be expected to submit to the Board. Trustees Crowley and 
Rowland who had served on the Presidential Search Committee 
recalled the procedures followed by that group in screening from an 
original list of 200 names down to 15, divided into three groups. 

Dr. Croce noted that the Board has previously tended to 
reject candidates who were not acceptable to faculty and students 
and would undoubtedly continue this policy. Mr. Healey felt that 15 
names would be the maximum number which the Trustees could be 
expected to evaluate. 

Trustee Troy stated that the Search Committee should not 
be comprised exclusively of faculty and students, and should take 
suggestions from any sources. 

Pursuing Mr. Burroughs' comment that he has heard ex- 
pressions of faculty disapproval of the presidential search pro- 
cedure, Trustee Gordon commented that--at the time--there was a very 
substantial feeling of cooperation and agreement. Dr. Abrams 



COMMITTEE 



I 



II 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

reasoned that there is now a "crisis of confidence" , but that all 
groups basically want to find the best qualified man for the 
position. Chairman Healey stressed that the Trustees must have the 
confidence of the faculty and student. Although the Board has the 
final say, the search will be a mutual process and decision. Re- 
plying to a question from Mrs. Ross, the Chairman stated that the 
Board will not make nominations of names to the Search Committee; 
this will be the prerogative of the committee itself, except for 
Trustees serving on the committee. 

Mr. Broadhurst, summarizing the issues under discussion, 
observed that (1) since the Chancellor will be involved primarily 
with the Amherst campus, it is essential that he have the appro- 
bation of that constituency; and (2) the Search Committee should 
be established by the Trustees and instructed by them. 

Trustee Abrams and Rowland questioned Professor Burroughs 
on the Faculty Senate's reaction to the overall approach being 
taken by the Executive Committee. Mr. Burroughs felt personally 
that, once the feeling of alienation is resolved, the Senate will 
accept the Board's decision. Trustee Gordon urged that the 
Executive Committee go into executive session and proceed with the 
formation of the search committee format for recommendation to the 
Board. There was general agreement that the committee should in- 
clude alumni representation, although Mr. Burroughs indicated that 
he considered it not so important in the choice of a Chancellor as 
that of a President. 

In closing, Chairman Healey referred to the concern of 
the Trustees at the time of Dr. Tippo's prior resignation in 1969. 
He assured the assembly that the present situation is part of the 
evolution from a single campus to a university system. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 
of discussing the composition of and possible 
nominees to the Search Committee for a Chancellor. 

The meeting was adjourned at 6:05 p.m. 





Robert J. /McCartney // 
Secretary*/ Board of Trustees 



3803 

Exec. Comm. 
10-7-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Search Committee 
for a 
Chancellor 



3804 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston-- 

Counseling 

Report 

Doc. T72-012 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
November 1, 1971, 12:45 p.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland; President Wood; Trustees Croce, Shaler 
Sandwen, Snowden; Secretary McCartney, Miss Pugh, recorder. 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff and Invited Guests : 

From UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs Gage, Professor Burke, 
representing the Faculty Senate, Messrs. Darland and Forsyttjie 

From UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Mr. Gerald Sullivan, 
Director of Student Affairs 

From UM/Medical School : Miss Coulter 

Consultant: Mr. Lyons 



Chairman Rowland called the meeting to order at 12:50 p.m. 
Acting Chancellor Bromery introduced the new Acting Vice Chancellor 
For Student Affairs, Dr. Gage. Professor Burke, representing Pro- 
cessor Burroughs for the Faculty Senate, was introduced by Secretary 
IcCartney. 

The Chairman informed the committee of an invitation to 
lold a Student Activities Committee meeting at the 1971 SWAP con- 
ference. Dr. Bromery suggested that it would be worthwhile to dis- 
:uss the future of residential colleges at that meeting since all 
:omponents of the University would be represented at SWAP. The 
chairman requested that Dr. Bromery send information on the residentiall 
:olleges at %he Amherst campus to the committee prior to that meeting. 

The first item on the agenda for the meeting was the report 
on Counseling Services at UM/Boston (Document T72-012 ) which had been 
requested by the Chairman at the meeting of the committee in June. 
Discussion followed regarding the content of the report with Mr. 
Sullivan responding to questions by the committee. He said that all 
of the staff positions listed were full-time personnel. Mrs. Rowland 
: : elt that the report was not quite adequate and that much more detail 
would be required in order to satisfy the intent of the committee's 
request. 

Since a major concern of the committee was the counseling 
d>f black students, Mr. Sullivan was asked to discuss his report re- 
garding this matter. He replied that the original design for the 
Special Admissions Program at the Boston campus was for disadvantaged 
students, not as a minority program. At the present time, there are 
bout 607o minority students (407 o non-minority) involved in the program 
xKth an all minority staff. He said that there is a heavy use of this 
I rogram by black students. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



U 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Snowden inquired if there has been any analysis 
of what the black students are looking for in utilizing these ser- 
vices. In response, Mr. Sullivan said that the Afro-American 
society is a "strong cohesive force" for the black students. Mrs. 
Snowden questioned that statement and also suggested that the whole 
living- learning aspect of the student's life be considered as part 
of a total outlook by the counseling service. 

Trustee Croce commented that the UM/Boston Counseling Ser' 
vice was a relatively new program that grew to meet the demands of 
students almost in a crisis situation. He felt that a good job has 
been done. The subject of counseling, he said, should be given 
some guidelines from the President's Office in terms of a University 
wide basis of services to be available. The guidelines would in- 
clude criteria for selection of personnel, as well as evaluation of 
adequacy. The application of the services, though, should be largely 
autonomous on each campus . 

President Wood sees the committee meetings of the Trustees 
as enormously valuable in that policy could emerge as a result of 
give and take between the campus and the Trustees. It has been 
his hope that the material provided to the Trustees would be ade- 
quate enough so that the Trustees could move forward on policy 
determination. From the campus point of view, the President feels 
that the opportunity given to the campuses to speak before the com- 
mittees and present a case for their specific needs is extremely 
helpful. The President also felt that the UM/Boston report was not 
an adequate response since it does not state how far the counseling 
offices are trying to go or in what direction. 

Trustee Snowden was concerned that the Trustees seem to 
be in the adversary role. "What we are all concerned with is the 
welfare of our students," she said. 

Mr. Sullivan apologized to the committee and said that he 
had misunderstood the charge that was given to him. He could pro- 
vide more information to the committee. 

General discussion followed regarding the present coun- 
seling situation on the Boston campus, particularly for black 
students. Some suggestions were made on what could be done to pro- 
vide good counseling services. Trustee Croce pointed out that due 
to the nature of the commuter campus, one is less likely to dis- 
cover individual difficulties early. He suggested that we look at 
counseling from a prophylactic standpoint rather than from one of 
treatment after harm has been done. Mrs. Snowden mentioned that 
students at the Boston campus do not have as much time to "find 
themselves" and are more intense. They become frustrated because 
they do not get enough help or encouragement. She suggested that 
the counseling service think about developing mechanisms to reach 
them instead of saying the mechanisms are all there and one must 
go get them. 

In terms of financial resources, Mr. Sullivan said that 
one of the difficulties is deciding how much money should be allotted 



3805 

Student Act. 
11-1-71 

UM/ Boston- 
Counseling 
Services Report 



3806 



Student Activitie 
11-1-71 

UM/Boston-- 
Counseling 
Services Report 



COMMITTEE 

UM/ Amherst- - 
Counseling 
Services Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for counseling services versus money for financial aid. 

On the subject of students as counselors, Dr. Croce dir- 
ected the discussion to the Amherst campus report (Document T72-013) 
and its mention of students lending support as dorm counselors. 
Dr. Bromery explained that the undergraduate counselors in the dorms 
are looked upon as a first line counseling level. Dr. Gage pointed 
out the emerging use of the para-professional. He said that these 
students are sensitized to the needs and concerns of people and act 
as catalysts. The procedure begins with the open door, easy access, 
assessment, and referral. The only parallel on the Boston campus is 
the student drop-in center. 



Trustee Shaler wanted to know what is being done for com- 
muter students on the Amherst campus. Acting Chancellor Bromery 
replied that the report under consideration was just a start. 
UM/ Amherst will be working on a follow-up report with more specific 
recommendations. He also mentioned that the Counseling Services 
would be moving out of Whitmore Administration Building into Munson 
Hall together with all the other services of this kind on the Amherst 
campus. The greatest weakness for the counseling services at Amherst, 
Dr. Bromery said, is for the off-campus student. 

Trustee Shaler said that the University should take the 
initiative in trying to reach the students, especially the commuters 
both at Amherst and Boston. He feels that students know very little 
about what kinds of services are available to them. 

In response to a question about what kind of role student 
organizations can play, Trustee Sandwen spoke of the programs in 
which students have already become involved, such as legal services 
and drug counseling. Programs the students are next most concerned 
about are financial aid and job placement counseling. 

The discussion then focused on what the University should 
do in regard to counseling. Trustee Snowden suggested that there 
should be some kind of connection between community services and 
the University. Acting Vice Chancellor Gage said that he was grate- 
ful to get the committee's attention. The opportunity gives the 
Amherst campus a chance to really look at what they are doing. He 
feels that we should develop a wealth of opportunities for helping 
a wide range of people. There is a need to develop a much broader 
out-reach program, rather than setting up a pool of resources that 
would be available, in order to anticipate the varying needs of the 
community. There is a need for different models of administration 
of professionals and para-professionals. 

Mrs. Snowden pointed out that society is stuck with words, 
such as the combination of "black" and"disadvantaged". Such at- 
titudes should be changed. Dr. Gage said that the institution must 
be modified to meet the needs which are identified. The Acting 
Chancellor also mentioned that one cannot set up an organization to 
solve a problem; one has to change the system. The students should 
not be the only ones to change, according to Dr. Bromery. 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Darland pointed out that the process of dealing with 
the problems of black students had provided the staff an awareness 
that they are not meeting all of the needs of some other students 
as well. He said that the Amherst report tried to get across the 
point that, although they agree that providing black students with 
black counselors is valid, this solution does not deal with other 
important institutional problems. 

Discussion then followed concerning some ideas that the 
University might follow in order to bring about change. It was 
suggested that more emphasis be placed on the freshman year experi- 
ence; perhaps a freshman seminar to focus on an introduction to the 
University. Other suggestions included: more emphasis on student 
guidance, establishment of a "big brother" program. 

The Chairman reminded the committee that its purpose is 
to be concerned with policy that could be recommended to the Board 
of Trustees, which, in turn, would authorize the administration on 
the campuses to implement the policies as approved. The committee 
discussed what steps should be taken to prepare some policy state- 
ments. 

President Wood recommended that the committee authorize 
the establishment of a study group with Dr. Gage as chairman, work- 
ing with both Chancellors and Dean Soutter, to come up with an ap- 
propriate policy recommendation that would provide these three 
characteristics : 

1. It would set forth the total cost and manpower 
implications of a positive program in student servicejs, 

2. It would go forward in terms of the broader 
range of recommendations which the Amherst campus is 
formulating, but which have not, as yet, been com- 
pleted. 

3. It would give us some policy guidelines in- 
cluding an indication of relative priorities so that 
the Trustees might determine how they feel about 
this versus other programs that might cost money. 

All of the above should be formulated on a comparative, 
University-wide basis. We should have some kind of a statement by 
the first of the year, based on empirical evidence certified by 
competent outside professional advice, that we have the adequate 
resources identified to carry out the program. 

Chairman Rowland called for the material to be in the 
hands of Secretary McCartney not later than December 1 for dis- 
tribution to the committee. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the establishment of a pan-campus study 
group on student services, with special emphasis 
on counseling, under the chairmanship of Acting 



StudfenPAcV. 
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Counseling 
Services Report 



3808 

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UM/Amherst-- 
Counseling 
Services Report 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Robert Gage, UM/ Amherst, said 
group to develop policy option proposals for 
Trustee consideration with the assistance of 
outside professional consultants so required; 
and to request that a preliminary report be 
presented to the Secretary not later than 
December 1, 1971. 

Trustee Shaler suggested that a joint meeting of the Stu- 
dent Activities and the Faculty and Educational Policy Committees be 
held at the SWAP conference in Northfield, on Saturday, November 20, 
since both groups are concerned with the residential colleges. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:40 p.m. 




Secretary, Board of Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND 
EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

2:00 p.m., Board Room, Whitmore Administration Building, 

UM/ Amherst 

November 3, 1971 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood, Trustees Maginnis, Sandwen, 
Shaler; Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

University-wide Office : Special Assistant Harman 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery; Vice Chancellor 

for Academic Affairs and Provost Gluckstern; 
Associate Provosts Bischoff, Hoopes, and 
Woodbury; Professors Friedman and Wogrin, 
representing the Faculty Senate; Dr. Venman, 
Acting Director of Continuing Education; 
Lawrence Ladd, representing the Student 
Senate 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Broderick, Dean of Faculty and 
Provost Marshall 

UM/Medical School: Dean Soutter 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 2:10 p.m. 

Dr. Bischoff presented a request for the establishment of 
a New Department of Exercise Science . (Doc. T72-014) The six 
faculty members proposed for this department -are a well-qualified 
homogenous group. It was observed that this change involves no 
additional money but is part of the whole effort to improve academic 
quality. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the establishment of a Department of Exercise Science in 
the School of Physical Education. 

The Committee then turned to consideration of the Continu' 



ing Education Proposal for a Bachelor's Degree in General Studies . 
Doc. T72-015 Dr. Woodbury stressed the importance of providing this 
opportunity for part-time and older students. He mentioned that 
this as well as other special programs could be integrated with the 
general University program in two or three years, subject to a re- 
view and recommendation at that time. 



3809 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
11/3/71 



UM/Amherst — 
Department of 
Exercise 
Science 
Doc. T72-014 



UM/Amherst — 
Continuing 
Education- 
Bachelor's 
Degree in 
General 
Studies 
Doc. T72-015 



3810 



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Educational 
Policy 
11/3/71 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Nepotism 
Policy 

Revised to Con- 
flict of Inter- 
est Policy 
Doc. T72-016 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Speaking generally on the continuing education program, 
Dr. Venman noted a 307o growth over the three semesters it has existec 
Present enrollment numbers 376 individuals. Dr. Venman felt that 
the total would probably not get beyond YL of the University enroll 
ment, at least in the experimental stages, since most of the basic 
course work is accomplished at community colleges. Students are 
permitted to take courses under the regular University offerings, 
particularly in cases where there is a minimal demand at the continuj- 
ing education level, which requires at least 12 students in a class 

Replying to a question from President Wood, Dr. Venman 
stated that the Bachelor of General Studies requirements are designed 
to provide students who have either life experience or experience in 
a community college (or other program that does not specifically re- 
late to the University's course offerings) with the opportunity of 
earning a degree. It is intended to adapt a program of study to each 
student and to provide counseling and advising services on an indi- 
vidual basis. 



Regarding the probability of this degree program being 
offered by the University on state funds, Chairman Troy observed 
that this would depend on when it is able to command its own budget. 
Provost Gluckstern stated that it would be significantly more expen- 
sive on that basis since the faculty involved would be receiving fulj. 
rather than part-time compensation. Dr. Wood, noting that Chancellor 
Broderick and Dean Soutter are considering similar programs, expressed 
his concurrence with this "major first step," as an experimental 
pilot program which will be evaluated on a comprehensive basis. He 
observed that education throughout the Commonwealth is moving toward 
the open-university concept. 

Dr. Venman indicated that he is hopeful that state colleges 
may eventually cooperate in this kind of program and also become in 
volved. 



It was then moved, seconded, and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, because of the 
high interest in external degrees and open universities 
across the Commonwealth and the importance of initiating 
programs for part-time students, they approve the proposal 
that all present undergraduate degree programs and one new 
degree program, the Bachelor of General Studies, be made 
available to part-time students under the temporary aegis 
of the Division of Continuing Education. 

Provost Gluckstern next introduced discussion on Revision 



VOTED: 



of the Nepotism Policy , (Doc. T72-016 ) referring to the material 



mailed to the Committee and to the general feeling throughout the 
University community that the present policy should be replaced by a 
conflict-of-interest policy. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Wood reviewed the progress already made University- 
wide and by the President's Council, including Mr. Broadhurst's 
proposed vote and guidelines, with further variations to be developed 
and considered by the various campuses and the Committee. It is 
expected that the proposal will be going to the full Board in Decem- 
ber. 



Provost Gluckstern stated that the intention is to avoid 
conflict of interest and to assure that each case be judged on the 
professional ability of the individual. Dr. Wood referred to a 
staff paper prepared by Peter Kaplan dated October 28, 1971. (Doc. 
T72-016 ) He said, with Dr. Bromery's concurrence, that the proposed 
resolutions will be revised on an "affirmative action" basis definin 
a more positive tenure policy, emphasizing due process, and requiring 
follow-up review. 

General Maginnis queried regarding changes in the areas of 
direct supervision by a spouse and employment in the same department 
The President replied that the proposed policy precludes a spouse 
taking part in the active career advancement of the other spouse. 
Further, it requires that, in the event of the appearance of con- 
flict of interest, sufficient documentation be on file to show that 
the spouse is the best-qualified person available for the position 

Chancellor Broderick asserted that the proposed policy is 
more restrictive — in the sense that its procedural requirement will 
require clear standards and comprehensive documentation—rather than 
less than the one currently in effect. He cited several problem 
cases at UM/Boston. Also, he referred to current discussions bet- 
ween the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination and UM/ 
Boston and noted the possibility of a finding that the same rule 
(nepotism policy) is being applied differently on the Amherst and 
Boston campuses. 

President Wood proposed that, if Mr. Broadhurst develops 
a policy defining a method of choice and providing for an appeal 
process and adequate documentation so that a decision can be made 
soon, the Commission will be satisfied. 



Replying to Chairman Troy's question regarding retroactivity 
of the change in policy, if adopted, Dr. Wood stated that it would 
not be applied retroactively. However, there would be provision for 
handling specific cases administratively. This would not eliminate 
instances of present litigation, but should relieve the Board from 
being increasingly involved in such cases in the future. 

For the purpose of discussing a specific personnel probleir 
case, President Wood then moved and it was seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of discussing 
an individual problem case under the Nepotism Policy. 

After appropriate discussion, the Committee voted to re- 
turn to open session and continue with the agenda. 



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UM/ Amherst — 
Nepotism Policy 
Revised to Con- 
flict of 
Interest Policy 
g Doc. T72-016 



381^ 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
11/3/71 

COMMITTEE 

UM/ Amherst — 
Change in 
Academic 
Calendar, 
1972-73 



UM/Amherst-- 
Changes in 
Pass-fail 
Policy and 
Grading Policy 



UM/Amherst-- 
Grading Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Both Chancellor Broderick and Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
indicated that qualified family members have received equal consider 
ation for employment and tenure recommendations but that these areas 
need further attention and development. 

With the special permission from Chairman Troy, Dr. Gluck- 
stern presented two items not on the agenda for discussion only by 
the Committee. No action is to be taken at this meeting. The items 
were: UM/ Amherst — Change in the Academic Calendar, 1972-73 ; also, 
Changes in Pass-Fail and Grading Policy . 

Replying to Mr. Troy's concern about further reduction of 
the teaching time to 27 weeks, Provost Gluckstern cited pressure from 
the other four area colleges to coordinate calendars. Various aspeci: 
of student and faculty reaction were mentioned, as well as the ful- 
fillment of course requirements both on the Amherst campus alone and 
under the Five-College Cooperative Plan. There was some question as 
to whether or not a decision on implementing the calendar could be 
made administratively at the UM/ Amherst campus. However, since the 
item had not been included on the agenda, the Committee indicated 
that, if a vote was in order, they were not ready to act. Dr. 
Gluckstern outlined several problems involved; i.e. dormitory and 
meal charges for students in residence during January, equalizing 
faculty course responsibilities involving January term; also, the 
overall course structure as it would apply to matriculation require- 
ments, etc. 

Dr. Bischoff reviewed the broadened Pass-fail Policy at 
UM/ Amherst permitting each student to use this option in one course 
each semester, of which a total of five in the four-year college 
experience may be in core requirement courses. In addition, any 
school, college, or division may allow its student majors to satisfy 
up to 15 courses on a pass-fail basis. The administration believes 
that this policy influences students to enroll in more difficult, 
worthwhile courses without concern for grades. 

The Committee expressed concern for students planning 
graduate study, e pecially in medical schools, and for those seeking 
honors recognition. In these areas standard grades are essential 
for transcript purposes. Dr. Bischoff gave assurance that these 
aspects are explained prior to setting up a program of study using 
the pass-fail prerogative. 

Dr. Soutter commented that, although the Medical School 
uses the pass-fail system in all its courses, he anticipates some 
difficulties for graduates competing for positions with students froir 
other universities. 



Turning to the Grading Policy , Dr. Bischoff stated that the 
major changes involve going to an eight-point grading system and re- 
cording an F grade in a pass-fail course on the transcript. The 
changes in the system of warning, suspension, etc., being rather in- 
volved, will be submitted to the Committee in writing. Every effort 
is being made to advise and alert the student in jeopardy of dismissajl. 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Shaler mentioned the intention of the Committee on 
Student Activities to meet with the Committee on Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy to consider the residential college concept. Chairman 
Troy will contact Chairman Rowland to work out a mutually agreeable 
time for the meeting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:55 p.m. 




Robert J. ^'McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trus 



3813 



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Educational 
Policy 
11/3/71 



3814 



Student 

Activities 

11-20-71 



COMMITTEE 



General Dis- 
cussion on 
Residential 
Colleges 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
November 20, 1971, 1:30 p.m., Northfield Inn, 
East Northfield, Massachusetts 

PRESENT : Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland, Trustees Abrams, Sandwen, Shaler; 
Secretary McCartney, Miss Pugh, recorder. 

From UM/ Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice 
Chancellor for Student Affairs Gage, and delegates to the 
SWAP conference, including faculty, students and staff. 

Visiting Trustee : Crowley 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 1:40 p.m. She 
thanked the SWAP Committee for the invitation to hold an informal 
committee meeting during the conference. She remarked that the Com- 
mittee meeting held at last year's SWAP conference was helpful both 
to the members of her committee and to students from the Amherst 
campus. She informed those present of the vote that was passed at 
the last formal meeting of the Board establishing a pan-campus study 
group on student services, with special emphasis on counseling. This 
group will submit a preliminary report by December 1. 

The Chairman asked Dr. Bromery and Dr. Gage to make a few 
introductory comments before opening up the discussion to all present 
The agenda called for general discussion on residential colleges, 
residence halls, and student life. 

Acting Chancellor Bromery commented on the need for defin- 
ing the goals and objectives of the Amherst campus and seeing how 
they fit in with the goals and objectives of the multicampus univer- 
sity vis-a-vis the President's Office and the Future University Re- 
port. 

On a smaller scale, Dr. Bromery feels that the Amherst 
campus should have an in-depth study of residential colleges to 
determine their liability; also to work on the relationship between 
academic affairs and student affairs. The only way to establish a 
residential college, Dr. Bromery said, is to make this a goal of the 
Amherst campus. He also sees a close relationship between the resi- 
dential college and counseling, partly as a result of the reorganiza 
tion and decentralization. 

Acting Vice Chancellor Gage pointed to another dimension oi 
counseling which is important to both campuses, not only for the in 
dividual but for residential colleges as well. If the residential 
colleges are to be effective, they must be responsive to the needs of 
the students in attempting to provide living — learning experiences. 

Dr. Gage feels that the counseling component of the resi- 
dential college, "like a series of antennae", has an important part 
of play in picking up what the institution should be responding to in 
terms of needs. He Tikes the term "helping services" to suggest 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

other forms of assistance, even beyond counseling. 

Dr. Gage continued that there is a growing trend toward 
developing students as paraprofessionals so they may provide some of 
the services that the community needs: i.e. Room to Move and Peer 
Sex Education programs. He sees the use of students in paraprofes- 
sional positions as an important trend in both helping and teaching 
of students. 

The Acting Vice Chancellor also spoke of helping the in- 
stitution meet the needs of population groups whose requirements have 
not yet been sensed or responded to by the traditional academic in- 
stitutions, i.e., black students. 

Chairman Rowland then opened the meeting up for discussion 
and participation by the SWAP delegates. The following, in summary 
form, is a modified transcript of the highlights of that discussion: 

Academic Counseling : 

--There is a real need for better counseling with regard tc 
one's academic major and courses a student could take. 

--Choice of major should come later in the student's aca- 
demic life. 

--Dr. Gage responded that counseling is needed earlier, 
perhaps in junior high school, for an early identifica- 
tion program and an early career assistance. He also 
suggested that we need to work with career-planning peo- 
ple and faculty to help them create more imaginitive 
career-role models for students that are more consistent 
with new goals of youth and new social moods. Counseling 
should not become an isolated segment of the University. 
It was also mentioned that the University could help peo- 
ple in industry get a better sense of what young people 
are saying that they want to do. 

--Provost Gluckstern pointed out that, in CASIAC, this 
problem is under study along with a possibility of a one 
or two-credit seminar for incoming students that would 
bring in faculty from all over the campus to discuss the 
different curricula available as a formalization of the 
advising process. 

--Dr. Bromery observed that we must go beyond the campus-- 
into the precollege period of a student in the high 
school and junior high school. 

--Trustee Abrams cited what Hampshire College is doing in 
Holyoke. The program is called "Early Identification" 
and provides early counseling to some 40 children from 
the third grade of the lower economic community. 



331a 



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11-20-71 

General 
Discussion on 
Residential 
Colleges 



3816 



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Activities 

11-20-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

--Dr. Bromery favors early counseling out in the area 

where it is needed, like "Room to Move," a project easilj 
accessible to students and increasing the use of para- 
professionals . 

Commuter Student--Outreach 

--It was suggested that the student has to be identified ir 
the high school and followed on up to the University in 
order to know something about his history and where he is 
as well as the student knowing that the University knows 
where he is and cares. 

--The commuter student could be invited to affiliate infor 
mally (identify) with a residential college and utilize 
the services available. 

--Counseling for the student at the University is not goinj; 
to be effective if it is to be restricted solely to 
Student Affairs and staff people. Some faculty would 
like to get involved in counseling (not only academic 
counseling) . 

--The University should sponsor seminars for high school 
guidance counselors in the state to provide them with in- 
formation about the University--as well as more current 
printed matter. 



Residential Colleges 



--There is a problem of priority in terms of the residenti 
college becoming a reality. This is especially true wit|i 
regard to financial assistance. 

--The residential college must get on the priority list if 
the University is to have the kind of counseling service^ 
discussed here. 



-Trustee Sandwen pointed out that the residential college 
is extremely helpful (especially for freshmen and sopho- 
mores) to the general counseling office in giving studen 
a sense of identity, helping them to set their goals, 
and giving them some direction as well as helping them 
to maximize the resources of the University during their 
four years. He feels that the residential college shoulji 
get a very high priority and should be an integral part 
of the counseling program the University wants to genera 
He also recommended eliminating the problems that lead 
to students requiring counseling. 



al 



:s 



:e. 



■The residential college has been very slow in getting 
off the ground. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

--John Hunt, Master at Southwest, felt it was important to 
forget about the term "residential college" which has 
specific connotations of the University of Michigan, for 
example, and talk purely about a dormitory system and 
what it is supposed to be. However, disagreement was 
expressed on this point. 

--The building intended for a residential college should 
be so designed; this would affect the planning of the 
budget. 

— The University does have a residential college — according 
to some people--and that is Project 10 in Pierpont dormi 
tory in Southwest. It has a counseling program, academi 
program and counseling, with the help of students. 
Project 10 involves approximately 300 students. 

Experimental Programs : 

--Discussion on a need to develop a variety of experiences 
and programs — so that students can be productive. 

--It was pointed out that with all experimental programs 
there is a need for a concurrent, planned-evaluation 
scheme. 

--There should be an attempt to create some conditions 
where various kinds of programs can occur and all kinds 
of growth can take place rather than beginning with a 
model — give people choices. 

--Dormitories should have a particular character and stu- 
dents should have a choice as to what dorm he or she 
wants to live in; the system should be flexible enough 
so that students may change dorms if they so choose. 

Drop-outs in the University : 

--There should be a counseling program for students plan- 
ning to drop out of the University. 

— There is no "counseling out" of the University for stu- 
dents who wish to separate from the campus for any num- 
ber of reasons. 

--We should deal with the problem of a chronic identity 
crisis that is facing so many students today—this in- 
volves career counseling, what kinds of resources are 
available to them— we should deal with problems in a 
preventive way. 

--We should reach students before it is too late. 



381 



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Activities 

11-20-71 



3818 



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Activities 

11-20-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Other 

--We should bring to the campus persons in their profes- 
sional and career capacity to counsel with students 
planning careers in that same field. 

--Perhaps re-establish the freshmen orientation lecture 
series. 

--Provost Gluckstern informed the committee that CASIAC is 
providing information about alternatives as well as aca- 
demic advising. 

--Trustee Abrams requested concrete information on what 
happens to students who drop out. 

--Dr. Bromery urged taking a look at how counseling would 
help in the Division of Continuing Education. 

Chairman Rowland thanked all those who attended the meeting; 
It was adjourned at 2:40 p.m. 




Robert JA/McCartney /f 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON 
FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

December 3, 1971, 9:30 a.m., President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Carman, Greenblatt 
Lambson, Maginnis, Sandwen, Shaler; Secretary McCartney; 
Mrs. Holden, recorder. 

Visiting Trustee : Haigis 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Mr. 
Kaplan 

UM/ Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery; Vice Chancellor 
Gluckstern; Acting Vice Chancellor Gage, Associate Provost 
Woodbury; Professors Burroughs and Burke, representing the 
Faculty Senate; David Hoffman, representative from Project 
10; Mr. Apostola, member of Search Committee for a Chan- 
cellor . 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Dr. Marshall, Dean of 
Faculty and Provost; Mr. Freeland, Assistant to the Chan- 
cellor. 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 9:30 a.m. 

Dr. Gluckstern presented a request to establish the title, 
Faculty Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, as a desig- 
nation for a faculty member of another recognized college or univer- 
sity engaged in conducting or cooperating in research activities of 
a recognized Department, Program, Institute, or Center on the Amhers 
campus. Compensation, if applicable, would normally be from federal 
or industrial funds. Dr. Gluckstern stated that persons from govern- 
mental agencies collaborating on a research level could also be 
designated as Faculty Research Associates. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they establish 

Faculty Research Associate, University of Massachusetts, an 
a title designation intended primarily for a person who 
holds a faculty rank of Assistant Professor or higher at 
another recognized college or university and who would 
thereby obtain affiliation, with or without compensation, 
with a recognized Department, Program, Institute, or Center 
of the University for the purpose of conducting or cooperai: 
ing in research activities under the sponsorship of said 
unit. 



3819 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 



UM/ Amhers t-- 
Title--Faculty 
Research 
Associate 



3820 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 

Policy on 
Discrimination 

and COMMITTEE 

Conflict of 

Interest 

Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Phillips introduced the agenda item, Policy 
on Discrimination and Conflict of Interest . He distributed the 
most recent draft memorandum and proposed vote (revised 11-30-71, 
Doc. T72-020 ) incorporating oral and written comments received from 
the campuses and the President's Council. Further suggestions from 
the Committee, the President's Council, and others will be considered 
by the Office of the President up to the date of the Trustee meeting 
on December 28. 

Requests to permit relatives of University staff members 
to be employed temporarily under the same procedures applicable to 
full-time employment; i.e., on the basis of full qualification by 
virtue of specific experience or skills, are being considered. Thus 
relatives of staff members would not automatically be excluded from 
consideration for temporary employment. 

Dr. Bromery conveyed the request from the Faculty Affairs 
Committee of the Faculty Senate, UM/Amherst, that the entire policy 
be retroactive, if not for salary purposes, at least for credit 
toward tenure. Dr. Gluckstern proposed leaving credit for previous 
service to the discretion of the Department Head. 

Following a discussion of the semantics of the vote, it 
was the consensus that the policy should be flexible but firm, with 
provision for administrative judgment. Once in effect, and as variolas 
applications evolve, guidelines can be developed in the best interests 
of the University. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern referred to comments from the 
UM/Amherst Faculty Affairs Committee, the Deans' Council, and the 
Women's Affairs Committee. His belief is that the last paragraph 
of the vote implies consultation by the President with various cam- 
pus groups in making and publishing guidelines. Mr. Phillips as- 
sured the group that this assumption is correct. 

Mr. Kaplan clarified the Difference between the words "as 
well qualified" and "especially qualified." The former applied to 
the appointment of any faculty member; the latter, to cases involvin 
conflict of interest requiring an exception to the general employmen 
policy. 

It was noted that "direct supervision" can involve various 
working relationships. Transfers, marriage, etc., may later e ffect 
situations not apparent at the time of appointment. Individual case£ 
will be considered as they develop. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the following 

be adopted as University policy respecting the appointment 
promotion, retention and determination of other conditions 
of employment of officers and employees of the University, 
subject to such specific provisions respecting particular 



I 



COMMITTEE 



3821 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

categories of employees as may not or hereafter be 
contained in agreements entered into with employee 
organizations under the provisions of General Laws 
Chapter 149, Section 178F as now in effect or here- 
after amended, namely: 

The Board of Trustees reaffirms that it is the policy 
of the University of Massachusetts that every office 
or employee shall perform all official actions in 
full accord with the Constitution and applicable 
laws and regulations of the United States and of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts and shall take affir- 
mative action to ensure equal employment opportunity 
for all persons without regard to race, color, reli- 
tion, sex, or national origin. This includes re- 
cruiting, appointment, training and development, 
promotion, tenure, wages, hours, and other condition 
of employment at the University of Massachusetts. 
The principal criteria for decisions in such matters 
shall be demonstrated qualifications for, or perfor- 
mance of, the duties and responsibilities of the 
position involved. 

No officer or employee of the University shall parti 
cipate directly in any decision or recommendation 
relating to appointment, promotion, retention, tenur^, 
or other condition of employment at the University 
of any parent, child, spouse, sibling, parent-in-law 
sibling-in-law, child-in-law, or stepchild of such 
officer or employee, or directly supervise the per- 
formance of any such person except under such cir- 
cumstances as the President of the University may 
determine as warranting waiver of this prohibition 
in the best interests of the University. 

Appropriate records shall be made respecting all 
decisions and actions subject to this policy and 
the President of the University is hereby authorized 
to make and publish such guidelines and interpreta- 
tions as to him may seem necessary and desirable to 
carry this policy into effect. 

Referring to the UM/Amherst Report on Residential Colleges 
and Living-Learning Programs (Doc. T72-021 ) , Chairman Troy proposed 
a discussion of the status of achievement of residential college 
living at the University, including the physical structure but 
eliminating consideration of living-learning experiments and courses 

Dr. Woodbury outlined the structure of the Orchard Hill 
Complex, UM/Amherst, as being the closest to a residential college 
on that campus. Within this Complex, which houses 1400 students, 
classes, courses, and various kinds of educational projects are 
offered. Although there is some control over curriculum deviation, 
the program has its own peculiar course creations as well as educa- 
tional projects without academic credit. Unlike a true residential 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 



UM/Amherst- - 
Report on 
Residential 
Colleges and 
Living-Learning 
Programs 
(Doc. T72-021 ) 



3822 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 



COMMITTEE 

UM/Amherst-- 
Report on 
Residential 
Colleges and 
Living -Learning 
Programs 
(DOC. T72-021 ) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

college, Orchard Hill has no admissions procedures and does not em- 
ploy its own faculty. Professor Burke observed that only about a 
quarter of the students living there are fulfilling their class 
requirements at Orchard Hill. Proposals are being considered for a 
more selective admissions policy and a requirement that students tak£ 
most of their courses there. 

In defining the role of faculty at Orchard Hill, Dr. Wood 
bury proposed that special qualifications for serving in a residential 
college be considered; also, that specific allocations to departments 
be made to encourage faculty recruitment. 

Dr. Bromery outlined the residential college concept at 
Santa Cruz where each residential unit is organized independently around 
350-400 students and faculty, each college having its own Vice Chan- 
cellor. 

Replying to Mr. Troy's previously expressed concern regard 
ing the legal problems encountered in Massachusetts when attempting 
to combine state and private funds, the Acting Chancellor suggested 
using capital outlay funds to renovate seventeen of the older dormi- 
tories already paid for. These would lend themselves very well to 
the residential college concept. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern cautioned that faculty appoint- 
ments should not be the complete responsibility of the residential 
college, but rather that a major responsibility of each department 
should be to propose qualified candidates. This would permit flexi- 
bility in teaching assignments, both for the residential colleges 
and for the faculty. Dr. Gluckstern continued that a high value 
should be placed on participation when rating performance and alloca 
ing funds . 

Noting the advantages of residential colleges as opposed 
to the present arrangement, Chairman Troy cited the dehumanizing 
aspects of the usual, large university complex. Dr. Wood stated 
that it is the obligation of the Trustees and the administration to 
investigate all possible approaches to education. Trustee Lambson 
expressed his concern about financial duplication and the danger of 
using inappropriate facilities. Further discussion included Profes- 
sor Weaver's outline of the residential system at San Diego with 
2,500 students in each college; also, the reasons why students re- 
quest assignment to houses in Orchard Hill (location is a prime fac- 
tor) and reference by Dr. Gage to the Living-Learning Evaluation 
Committee report, due shortly. 

Trustee Sandwen, on behalf of Project 10 (Pierpont House) 
students and faculty, requested an opportunity to present to the 
Committee a report on the experimental college being developed there 
along with a continuing evaluation of its freshmen in their total 
college experience. Mr. Hoffman, Assistant Director of the Project, 
mentioned that the study involves about 140 freshmen in Pierpont as 
well as a number of other students in the Southwest Area. 



COMMITTEE 



3823 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In addition to the Project 10 Measurement Committee directs 
by Professor Schumer (Psychology) , there is a Faculty Senate Ad Hoc 
Committee on Residential Colleges headed by Professor Varley invest! 
gating the possible further development of residential colleges at 
UM/Amherst. Chairman Troy requested that the Committee be supplied 
with copies of all relevant reports for study prior to scheduling a 
meeting solely to the subject of residential colleges. At President 
Wood's suggestion, the Committee agreed that a supper meeting at 
Project 10 should be arranged in the near future. Trustee Shaler 
also expressed interest in receiving from Orchard Hill a faculty- 
student evaluation of the present program. 

Dr. Wood then introduced two items for the Medical School 

which were not on the agenda: (1) the Western Reserve Salary Plan 

for Medical Professors and (2) the Title of Teaching Fellow, UM/ 
Medical School. 

Dean Soutter said that outstanding specialists were being 
recruited under the Western Reserve Salary Plan whereby the Medical 
School at Western Reserve pays a relatively small salary (e.g., 
$10,000-$20,000) and the doctor, through private practice, would be 
permitted to earn up to a specified amount (e.g., $50,000). A per- 
centage of anything earned above that amount would be returned (e.g 
keep 50%, 25% to the Hospital, and 25% to the Medical School). Dr. 
Wood mentioned the possibility that such transfers of private funds 
may have to be returned to the State Treasury. Before a similar plah 
is adopted by the Medical School, a ruling will need to be requested 
from the Attorney General. Dr. Greenblatt noted that the Department 
of Mental Health has a similar policy which designates the physician 
appointment ?as part-time, and requires an affidavit that outside 
work is performed "on time not owed to the Commonwealth." Chairman 
Troy requested Dean Soutter to submit a statement for study and late|: 
action by the Committee. 

Dr. Soutter then requested consideration of the title 
"Teaching Fellow" for persons who have finished their internship but 
wish to remain at the Medical School for special training in areas 
supported by grants while engaged in teaching assignments for the 
School. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they approve 
the title of Teaching Fellow at the Medical School, UM/ 
Worcester. 

Dr. Gluckstern contrasted the connotations of the same 
title at UM/Amherst and indicated that he was considering this or a 
similar title, in addition to the title "Teaching Assistant," to 
differentiate between two categories, with one having additional 
responsibility and prestige. Mr. Troy stated that today's action 
was solely for the Medical School, and Dr. Gluckstern agreed to rein 
troduce the proposal for a new title for UM/Amherst at a later date. 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 

UM/Amherst- - 
Report on 
Residential 
Colleges and 
Living- 
Learning 
Programs 
(Doc. T72-021) 



UM/Worcester-- 
We stern Reserve 
Salary Plan for 
Medical 
Professors 



UM/ Worcester -- 
Title of 
Teaching Fellow, 
Medical School 



3824 

Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 

UM/Boston — 
College III 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy introduced the agenda item, College III , UM / 
Boston . He observed that it may well be one of the most important 
undertakings of the University, since it involves establishing a 
college of 2500 students (larger than most colleges in the Northeast 
There are very few guidelines available as a basis for judging the 
assumptions and programs of the proposal which must be given extreme 
careful consideration by the Committee. 

At Mr. Troy's invitation, Chancellor Broderick read a pre- 
pared statement on College III (Doc. T72-022 , attached), copies of 
which were distributed. Another document entitled "Report of the 
University Committee to Plan College III, June 1971" (Doc. T72-023 ) 
had been supplied to the Committee prior to the meeting. 

The proposed College of Public and Community Service, UM/ 
Boston, combines liberal arts in the classroom with social service 
work in the field. Originally discussed in preliminary fashion by 
the Board at Hyannis in December, 1970, the proposal calls for open- 
ing College III in September, 1972, with 18 faculty and 250 students 

College III organization tasks still to be accomplished 
include appointment of a Dean and a faculty, decisions on curricula 
setting of admissions policies, and the specific delineation of cer- 
tificates; also, arrangements for field experience. 

Trustee Maginnis cautioned that the candidate selected for 
the Deanship must be in agreement with the goals set up for College 
III. Chancellor Broderick assured him that the candidates approache|d 
to date have been fully informed of projected plans. 

Chairman Troy expressed his concern with the quality and 
effectiveness of a liberal arts program adapted to work-study in an 
urban setting; e.g., natural and social sciences and the humanities 
Chancellor Broderick replied that a science professor, for instance, 
would find many areas for study in the field of ecology. An overall 
appreciation of man, his world, and society will be continually cul 
tivated. Referring to the intent of the University Committee to 
Plan College III, Mr. Freeland emphasized the value of focussing 
upon a problem-centered curriculum aimed at creating a better under 
standing of self and others. 

Replying to Mr. Troy's question about the proportion of 
liberal arts subjects in contrast to the practical arts, Dean Marshall 
assured the Committee that a keen interest in the program at College 
III has been expressed by members of the present faculty at UM/Boston, 
most of whom were traditionally prepared in the usual liberal arts 
fields. The Chairman stressed the basic need for liberal arts to 
foster intellectual growth and to provide students with cultural and 
social growth and mobility. 

Dr. Greenblatt complimented Chancellor Broderick on his re 
port and added that the field experience can be absolutely vital in 
preparing students for positions following graduation. 



I 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Bromery inquired as to the student's flexibility for 
transferring into various academic areas. Chancellor Broderick sta- 
ted that the liberal arts concept allows late specialization and 
should present no problem for a student desiring to change his caree:: 
concentration, even in the senior year. 

Trustee Maginnis affirmed his belief that implementation 
of College III planning should proceed gradually with a broad area 
of diversification; also, that the importance of advisors should be 
emphasized. Chancellor Broderick, noting that there will be certain 
budget restrictions, explained that College III concept places an 
emphasis on overall flexibility. 

President Wood encouraged the Chancellor to proceed with 
implementation of College III. He reminded him that the established 
procedure for a Search Committee for a Dean is to submit three to 
five names to the President for review and decision comparable to 
the Trustees' requirement in the case of a Chancellor. He emphasized 
his personal interest in urban programs, noting that a previous Dart' 
mouth-MIT field study conducted in the Boston area had resulted in 
more than 80% of the students involved seeking careers in urban fields 

Adding that the program is both unique and complex, the 
President stressed the necessity for communicating with state and 
community colleges to avoid duplication of planning. He also empha 
sized the importance of careful allocation of resources to College 
III. The President stated his agreement with the goals outlined by 
Chancellor Broderick, but indicated that the appointment of a Dean 
would not relieve the Trustees or the Office of the President of con- 
tinued responsibility for overview of the development of the curricu 
and programs of the College. 

Dr. Bromery expressed his concern that the urban community 
might doubt the motives behind the field-training approach. to learn- 
ing, inferring that it is actually a system method for keeping in- 
formed about potential problems, rather than solving them. He also 
noted that this is the only area which has not been approached for 
suggestions and comments about the proposal for College III. Presi- 
dent Wood concurred that communication between all social levels is 
expecially advantageous. 

Chancellor Broderick asserted that the College III program 
will be basically devoted to educating students s "not to remaking 
the world." This will be done through providing a liberal arts edu- 
cational experience designed to include some older and part-time 
students . 

In summary, the Committee noted the progress made by the 
Chancellor, faculty, and students at UM/Boston in initiating College 
III. It indicated its awareness of the complexities that lie ahead 
in developing the details of a new model for undergraduate professional 
education and, in particular, as the Committee on the Future Univer- 
sity stresses, "building links between the liberal arts and careers" 
and "avoiding narrow functionalism of undergraduate professional 



3825 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 



3826 



Faculty and 
Educational 
Policy 
12-3-71 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

schools of the past." Chairman Troy emphasized that the action taken 
at this meeting would be only a pilot course and would enable the 
Committee to think, study, and plan for further action in the spring 

Replying to Acting Chancellor Bromery's expression of con- 
cern about some of the terminology in the proposed vote, Dr. Wood 
stated that the provision for the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy to review all proposed appointments to College III applied 
only to the initial phase of its establishment. Dr. Weaver questioned 
whether this would include any College I and II faculty interested 
in transferring to College III. The President indicated that the 
Committee would merely need to be informed, since these would be 
transfers rather than appointments. 

Although agreeing with Chancellor Broderick's comment that 
the vote of the Committee would provide some advantages along with 
some disadvantages, Chairman Troy averred that it carries implied 
satisfaction with progress to date and extreme interest in future 
developments . 



and 



After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the next stage 
In the development of College III, UM/Boston, should take 
the form of detailed curricula and program planning and 
the recruitment of a limited number of exceptional quali- 
fied faculty with the view of initiating a pilot program in 
the fall of 1972. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they authorize 
not more than seven faculty positions, including the desig- 
nation of a Dean for College III, UM/Boston, at the present: 
time and that a detailed description of courses and programs 
be presented, to the President and the Board of Trustees 
next spring; also, the Committee on Faculty and Educational. 
Policy be informed of proposed appointments at all levels 
prior to any contractual commitments as well as any trans- 
fers of present faculty in College I and II. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 




Robert J. /MyCdrthe> 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



3827 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

December 3, 1971, 1:15 p.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St., 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Crowle|y, 
Knowles , Lambson, Maginnis; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary- 
McCartney; Miss Pugh, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Troy 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

President's Office : Vice President Phillips 

From UM/Boston: Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, Planning Officer O'Brien; Professor Weaver, 
representing the University Senate; Mr. Prince, Assistant 
Planning Officer. 

From UM/Medical School: Dean Soutter 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 1:00 p.m. Due to 
a prior commitment of the Dean of the Medical School, the Chairman 
called for discussion of the Medical School agenda items. 

Dean Soutter opened his comments with a schedule of con- 
struction for the hospital: bids go out on December 8; sub-bids 
are due in on January 26; the main bids are due in on the 8th of 
February. Construction is scheduled to begin on the 20th of March, 
and the building is scheduled to be completed and occupied in the 
fall of 1975. The Dean also reported that construction of the other 
buildings is going well. 

Dean Soutter informed the Committee that the firm of 
Campbell, Aldrich and Nulty wishes to be the coordinator for the 
furniture and finishes inside both main buildings. Since they are 
familiar with the buildings, the Dean feels they would probably do 
a better job than an interior decorator. 

The Chairman asked Treasurer Johnson whether or not this 
procedure conforms to the custom of the Board; also, to explain the 
procedure to the Committee. 

The Treasurer explained that the design contracts under 
which the architects are working provide that they are to advise and 
select colors for the walls, floors, etc.; but they are not be be 
involved in the selection or recommendation of furnishings or equip- 
ment. The University, on a project of this size, has recommended 
several times in the past and (BBC has approved) that we have com- 
mercial interior decorators assist, but they are permitted only to 
recommend on the selection of items , The other problem, said 



UM/Worcester-- 
Status of the 
Hospital 



3828 

B & G Comm. 
12-3-71 

UM/Worcester-- 
Status of the 
Hospital 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester-- 
Syrian 

Antiochal Church 
Property 



UM/Worcester-- 
Loam Donation to 
a Little League 
Field 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Johnson, is the writing of specifications for bid purposes. 
There is also the problem of additional cost; one would have to be 
certain that the same service was not being paid for twice in terms 
of selecting the colors, ect. The Treasurer observed that Dean 
Soutter and his staff would still face a tremendous amount of work. 

The President summed up the three main points made by the 
Treasurer: (1) we must be sure that the architect's present con- 
tract does not already include fees for color selection and interior 
decoration; (2) we must be sure that all legal procedures have been 
observed, and (3) we must have assurance of a reasonable economy of 
time and money. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Campbell, 
Aldrich and Nulty be designated as coordinators of 
color selection and interior decoration for the 
Medical Science Building and the Hospital at the 
Medical School, UM/Worcester. 

Dean Soutter next informed the Committee that the Syrian 
Antiochal Church in Worcester has agreed on the figure of $57,000 
as an acceptable price for their land abutting the Medical School 
property in Worcester. This sum is the average of three separate 
appraisals on the value of the property. The Dean asked the Com- 
mittee to approve the continuation of the negotiations on this 
property at the above figure. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Dean of the Medical School be authorized to con- 
tinue negotiations for the Syrian Antiochal Church 
property in the City of Worcester at the averaged 
appraisal figure of $57,000. 

Dean Soutter next informed the Committee of a request to 
donate loam from the Medical School property to a Little League 
field in the City of Worcester. Mr. Sargisson, staff attorney for 
the Medical School, suggests that the Board of Trustees donate 100 
yards of loam to the Surplus Administration for the Commonwealth, 
which could then give it to the Little League. 

Discussion followed. Trustee Knowles felt that this would 
be a gesture of good will by the Board of Trustees on behalf of the 
University. President Wood felt that the donation, in principle, 
seems to be acceptable. He suggested that the Committee give its 
approval in principle and then have Attorney Broadhurst review it. 

It was then moved, seconded and 



r 



i 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve, in principle, the donation of 100 yards 
of loam from the Medical School property to the 
Little League in the City of Worcester. 

Chairman Haigis then moved to the next item on the agenda, 
Capital Outlay Requests FY 73. President Wood said that it has been 
the custom of this Committee to review and comment at this time of 
year on capital outlay proposals of the University from the various 
campuses. Due to the extended duration of the legislative session 
(and thus to the lateness of the final capital outlay budget) as well 
as to internal developments within the Board of Higher Education, the 
timetable for submission of capital outlay requests this year has 
been afforded some breathing space. 

Vice President Phillips distributed copies of the capital 
outlay proposals (Document T72-025 ) that have come in to the President 
Office from the three campuses. These have not yet been reviewed by 
the President. The Committee will have an opportunity at the next 
meeting to discuss this item further. Mr. Phillips expects that the 
capital outlay proposals for the University as a whole will go to the 
full Board for final approval in January. 

Chairman Haigis felt that the Committee on Buildings and 
Grounds would need further time to study them. The Capital Outlay 
proposal for FY 1973 will be an agenda item at the Committee's next 
meeting. He then called for the progress report on College 030, 
UM/Boston. 

President Wood introduced the item to the Committee and 
said he felt that they should have three things: (1) an account of 
construction progress plans for capital outlay; (2) a discussion from 
the President's Office on what kind of review activity has taken 
place in the last year; and (3) a projection on some of the points of 
view on Columbia Point and how they can be presented to this Committed 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton reminded the Committee that the 
olumbia Point campus has 11 million dollars currently available in 
FY 72 capital outlay appropriations. Priorities must be determined 
for expenditure of this sum; also some should be requested for FY 73. 

The Vice Chancellor introduced Mr. O'Brien, UM/Boston Plan- 
ling Officer, who had prepared a status report of UM/Boston' s capital 
sutlay requests. 

Mr. O'Brien informed the Committee that his report would 
:ouch on some of the background of the capital outlay requests as 
well as discussion on options available for FY 1973. A brief summary 
)f the status report follows: 

Using charts prepared for the meeting Mr. O'Brien explained 
hat the buildings of Phase I were already under construction and 
hat buildings of Phase II (approved by the Board as part of the 54 

ijaillion dollar request) were separated into two parts: Part 1: 
(a) College 030, (b) part of the Science Building, and (c) the Physical 

Education Building. Part 2: College 040 and the Fine Arts Buildings. 



3829 

B & G Comm. 
12-3-71 

UM/Worcester-- 
Loam Donation 
to a Little 
League Field 

Status of 
Capital Outlay 
Requests FY 73 



Doc. T72-025 



UM/ Boston- 
Progress Report 
College 030 



UM/ Boston- 
Status Report 



3830 

B & G Coram. 
12-3-71 

UM/Boston-- 
Status Report 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. O'Brien outlined the rationale for a shift in location 
for College 040. The original proposed location consists of filled 
material. This creates a soil settlement problem. A firm decision 
on this matter does not need to be made until next September. 
Another issue that will have to be discussed in the near future is 
the question of development of the eastern end of the campus. 

Mr. O'Brien presented the enrollment and buildings pro- 
jection completed a few years ago as part of the Columbia Point 
master plan. There have been a number of decisions since that time 
that affect these projections; one being the leveling off of student 
enrollment at UM/ Amherst; and the increase of 300 students per year 
at UM/Boston. 

The opening of Phase I buildings is currently one year 
behind schedule. The schedule for the opening date of 1972 is on 
line, and the schedule for 1973 is "touch and go". 

Another item that has been discussed is the possible 
retention of 100 Arlington Street in Boston. Any renovations on 
this building to increase its capacity should occur in FY 77-78, 
according to Mr. O'Brien's projections. He said that we should 
anticipate putting in a request for next year if the decision is made 
to renovate the building. 

The Planning Officer observed two other items of signif- 
icance: (1) College 030 cannot open on schedule (September 1974) as 
of this time, and (2) the implications for future items, unless 
changes are made, is that other items cannot be moved ahead on the 
schedule. 

President Wood made two points. First, one of the reasons 
the Report of the Future University Committee may appear to have less 
impact is due to the excess student capacity that is coming on and 
the need to find more space in general. The other point is that 
College 030 should not be confused in physical terms with College II] 
in academic terms. 

Mr. O'Brien explained that there are many reasons for the 
delay of the original schedule, such as the Methane Study, which put 
the schedule behind four months. He also mentioned that the Univer- 
sity can keep a program on schedule up to a certain point. After 
that, the University's contribution is almost zero. The components 
that the University can contribute to are: programming, early stages 
of design, and the selection of designers. 

Chairman Haigis inquired about the difference in cost of 
the Fine Arts Building proposed at UM/Boston and the Fine Arts 
Building under construction at UM/Amherst. Mr. O'Brien said that ofi 
hand, he was not sure of the differences between the two buildings. 
The different time period in which each is constructed, of course, 
does affect the cost. The President added that the Fine Arts Build 
ing at UM/Boston is designed to be a more complete building and 
center than the facility at UM/Amherst. 



COMMITTEE 



383 1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. O'Brien discussed the capital items covered by the 
appropriations for FY 72 and the proposal for FY 73: the Physical 
Education Building, College 030, and the Science Building. All of 
these items were presented to the Board last year with the FY 72 
capital outlay request. At that time, a budget and program for each 
item was also presented. In the case of the Physical Education 
Building and College 030, the programs have remained unaltered and 
the budgets are the same. However, there is a new proposal for the 
Science Building which the Planning Officer was prepared to present. 

The Science Building is proposed to have an ultimate 
capacity of 507» laboratory space and 50% non- laboratory (which is 
almost the same as Phase I) . The difference between the program 
presented last year to the Board and the present one is that approx- 
imately one-half of the space that will ultimately be used as labs 
will be used for other functions on an interim basis. This would 
increase the capacity for students and help to alleviate some of the 
space deficit discussed earlier in terms of the enrollment projection 
and the building capacity projections. 

Unless the Trustees object, the designers would be asked 
to follow through on the modifications of the Science Building, 
according to Mr. O'Brien. He reported that this matter of modifi- 
cation of the Science Building has been discussed at great length. 
He also said he was prepared to distribute a more detailed program 
for the Physical Education Building, College 030, and the Science 
Building as well as one or two page summaries for College 040 and 
the Fine Arts Building. 



Trustee Troy inquired about the matching of the physical 
and academic aspects of the Columbia Point campus. Chancellor 
Broderick responded that UM/Boston is trying to keep options open 
in regard to the physical structure of the buildings. He said that 
things are different than they were when the master plan was developed 
a few years ago. There is a greater need for flexibility in any 
building constructed at the present time. 

Mr. O'Brien explained that the Science Building design pro- 
vides a capacity for laboratory equipment in the walls. Thus, the 
labs can be installed at a later time depending on the demand, 
onversion would take place with no high additional cost or disrup- 
tion of day-to-day functioning of the building. 

The President asked the Planning Officer to talk about the 
nost pressing problem on Phase I. Mr. O'Brien said that, presently, 
Phase I is falling behind little by little. The way it could be 
ivoided is to return to the overlapping design and construction 
schedules proposed originally for Phase I by Mr. Prince of the Plan- 
ling Office. 

Mr. O'Brien then discussed the problem of an interchange 
it Columbia Point. The original design called for a bridge at 
Morrisey Boulevard to the site. It was opposed by the community and 



B & G Comm. 
12/3/71 



UM/Boston-- 
Status Report 



3832 

B & G Coram. 
12-3-71 



UM/Boston-- 
Status Report 



COMMITTEE 



Doc. T72-026 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a new design was developed which was acceptable, but the Metropol- 
itan District Commission took six months to revise their construction 
contract. The result of this delay, according to Mr. O'Brien, means 
that the interchange would not open until after the campus opens. 
He said that there are two possible ways to alleviate this problem: 
the first is to have the MDC phase design and construction and the 
other is to have a grade interchange for a few months with traffic 
lights. This interchange presents a great problem as it is the only 
point on and off the campus. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton said that traffic conditions at 
Columbia Point are going to be bad without the interchange, especial 
ly getting buses onto the campus. He reported that work has been 
done on drafting legislation (Mr. O'Brien prepared this in February 
1971) which would, in effect, appropriate 13 million dollars for the 
acquisition of right of way, design, construction and purchase of 
rolling stock for a grade separator and connector. At the present 
time, a study has begun on this problem by the MBTA with an antic- 
ipated concluding date in nine months reported Dr. Hamilton. He 
said that the legislation would provide that the MBTA would super- 
vise the construction and the purchasing of equipment. 

President Wood summarized the discussion on Columbia Point 
as follows: (Document T72-026 ) Planning for Columbia Point , pre- 
pared by the President, was distributed to the Committee as part of 
the President's summary. 

Last year, Dr. Wood said, there was a review of Stage 1, 
primarily for information for a new President. Since then, as plans 
began to unfold on shifts in student population, circumstances 
changed causing the University to ask questions regarding the earlier 
plans and how they match up with the present situation. 

The President said the Administration has continued to 
strive for maximum flexibility. The University is at the point now, 
of bringing in a public developer to determine what flexibility 
remains in the master plan. The President may engage for this pur- 
pose Mr. Pease of Pittsburgh, or Mr. Appleby of New York. 

President Wood suggested that the main issues facing the 
University at Columbia Point are: the housing question, trans- 
portation (most important) and the question of the density and 
liveability of the site. The President said that he hopes that 
Phase II of the national wage and price guidelines will do something 
economically on the national scene to get more money back into the 
public arena. 

Trustee Crowley asked why questions are now arising which 
might alter the concept of the Columbia Point master plan as 
originally approved. The President responded that three elements 
are involved: (1) the underlying political questions that surround 
public resources allocations; (2) the changing time since the Board 
first made decisions on Columbia Point; (3) there is a new adminis- 
tration and the President felt an obligation to first inform himself 
about the University and second to ask questions. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton reminded the Committee that 
Chancellor Broderick proposed, in his speech before the Dorchester 
Board of Trade a few months ago, that the University at Boston seeks 
to relate broadly to the various communities of South Boston. 
Suggested at that time was the formation of a Community Development 
Corporation to consist of representatives from the community, the 
University, and the business sector of Boston. Dr. Hamilton reported 
a favorable response to the idea from all segments involved. 

Work has already begun on the formation of the corporation 
Mr. Getson, who has been engaged to develop this effort and to cover 
community relations, has prepared a description paper on what the 
objectives of this corporation would be and its cost. Once these 
have been determined, a conference is to be convened by UM/Boston 
together with all interested parties to decide when to formally 
establish the corporation, in which the University will have minor- 
ity representation. 

Chancellor Broderick felt that existence of the corporation 
would not relieve UM/Boston entirely of its responsibility for com- 
munity relations. He felt that substantial gains have been made in 
this area in the last year. 

Trustee Knowles was concerned that the corporation might 
become an elite organization. President Wood responded that it is 
being set up for a specific task and would not control the University 

Dr. Hamilton informed the Committee that the corporation 
plan calls for membership by one or two representatives from the 
Board of Trustees. 

At the conclusion of the meeting, Treasurer Johnson pre- 
sented a few slides of University property in Ohio bequeathed by the 
late Murray D. Lincoln; also slides of the University's holdings at 
Hodgkins Cove. 

The meeting x?as adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 



3833 




Robert J. AlcCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




B & G Comm. 
12-3-71 

UM/ Boston- 
Columbia Point 
(Corporation and 
Neighborhood 
Involvement) 



3834 



COMMITTEE 



Investment 
Counsel Report 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

December 9, 1971, 2:00 p.m., President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustees Knowles , Rowland; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Special 
Assistant Harman, Messrs. Kaplan and Weinstein; Assistant 
Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor Campion; Mr. William Hogan, 
Assistant Manager, Campus Center 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Vice Chancellor Hamilton 

UM/Worcester : Mr. Stockwell, representing Dean Soutter; 
Mr. Robert L. Cathey, Controller 

From Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. : Mr. Ladd 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 2:00 p.m. 

At the Chairman's invitation Mr. Ladd of Standish, Ayer, 
and Wood, Inc., investment counselors, distributed an outline of 
proposed changes in the University's investment portfolio to the 
Trustees. This was reviewed. Current and future prospects in the 
paper industry and banking were discussed. The consensus was being 
that the investment policy of the University should remain reasonably 
conservative. 

Treasurer Johnson noted that many universities are operating 
on the "total return concept" (reported to be illegal in Massachusetts) 
which considers part of the appreciated principal of a fund as curren 
income. This actually violates the provisions of a trust, unless the 
gift is unrestricted. Mr. Johnson also reported that Mr. Thornbury 
notified us that he is transferring as a gift to the Murray D. and 
Anne Lincoln Endowment 700 shares of American Cyanamide. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute changes in the 
University's investment portfolio as recommended 
by Standish, Ayer, and Wood, Inc. 



I 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Sell: 



2,102 Shares, First Banc of Ohio 
1,000 Shares, Allegheny Corp. 
394 Shares, Commonwealth Edison 

Buy : 

200 Shares, Smith, Kline & French 

200 Shares, National Gypsum 

400 Shares, Kimberly Clark 

500 Shares , Wachovia 

200 Shares, Goodyear Tire 

300 Shares, American Nat'l Gas 

600 Shares, Nabisco 

At President Wood's request, Treasurer Johnson informed the 
Committee that a gift will soon be received in the amount of $10,000, 
to be increased gradually to $50,000 as a permanent endowment in 
memory of the donor's wife. Limitations prescribe that scholarships 
be given on the basis of merit, rather than need, to Baptists or 
Episcopalians with preference to students entering the fields of 
engineering, agriculture, or law. Since final determination of recip 
ients must rest with the Trustees, it was suggested that the fund 
should be accepted and the details summarized and presented to the 
Committee by Treasurer Johnson. 

Discussion then turned to UM/Amherst: Rental Change Effec- 
tive 9-1-72 (Project 13) and Authorization for Increase in Security 



Deposit Effective 12-1-71 (Project 13) 



Mr. Campion, Vice Chancellor for Administration, UM/Amherst 
proposed a rental increase ($15 per month) and an increase in the 
security deposit (from $75 to one month's rent) for Project 13, the 
North Village Apartments, effective September 1, 1972. These in- 
creases have been negotiated with the Married Student Housing Com- 
mittee. Also, the Building Authority is seeking legal clearance of a 
security deposit increase from the Cost of Living Council. 

Mr. Pumphret listed several other areas of concern for the 
Building Authority; i.e. , allowing pets in Authority housing, stand- 
ardizing air conditioning, adjusting leases to commencement, etc. 
He noted that Mr. Kaplan is working with Attorney Goldings on approva 
of the rent increase. Mr. Goldings has stated that Committee action 
is desirable, but that it would be more proper for the Authority to 
invoke increases which apply to all three married-student apartments 
at UM/Amherst. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective September 1, 1972, the rental rates 
for University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority Project #13 (North Village Apartments) 



3835 



Fin. Comm. 
12-9-71 

Investment 
Counsel Report 



UM/Amherst- - 
Rental In- 
crease, 
Project 13-- 
North Village 



3836 

Finance Comm. 
12-9-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Rental Increase, 
Project 13-- 
North Village 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Secu^ity Deposit 
Increase-- 
North Village 
(Project 13) 



Doc. T72-020 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

shall, contingent on adoption of the rental 
schedule set forth below by the University of 
Massachusetts Building Authority, be established 
as follows: 

$150 per month-single bedroom apartment 
$170 per month-double bedroom apartment 

subject to approval by the appropriate Federal 
body charged with establishing rental rate 
guidelines . 

Replying to President Wood's question about the University'; 
tax obligation to the Town of Amherst, Treasurer Johnson said that 
the Commonwealth maintains a separate account from which payments 
are made in lieu of taxes on state-owned land at UM/Amherst including; 
tracts leased to the Building Authority. Currently, income from 
this source to the Town of Amherst amounts to $241,000. 

Mr. Campion stated that it is planned to offer tenants 
two choices: (1) pay the entire security deposit when taking tenancy 
and pay the rent monthly, or (2) pro-rate the security deposit and 
pay it monthly with the rent. He added, however, that most of the 
deposits are now made in a single payment. 



It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

effective December 1, 1971, a security deposit 
equivalent to one month's rent shall be re- 
quired of each lessee in University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority Project #13 (North 
Village Apartments) , payable to the University 
according to the terms, conditions and covenants 
stipulated in the University of Massachusetts 
Married Student Housing Lease Agreement (Doc. 
T72-020 ) , said increase in the security deposit to be 
subject to approval by the appropriate Federal 
body charged with establishing guidelines pertinent 
to this matter. 

Mr. Pumphret observed that he has had the advantage of being 
Chairman of the Building Authority during the period when these nego- 
tiations were going on, but that the rest of the Committee has had 
very little detail as background for considering these items. Dr. 
Wood re-emphasized that the established procedure was to transmit 
support documents and proposed votes to Trustee committees through the 
Office of the Secretary. In the present instance, support memos 
had been received, but not the proposed votes. 

Vice Chancellor Campion presented the item, Establishment 
of an Interest Earning Trust Fund for Security Deposits . Treasurer 
Johnson explained that this would establish an interest-earning 



r 



I 



] 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



trust fund in which security deposits would be placed to provide the 
57o interest accruals on moneys held more than one year, as stipulated 
in the Massachusetts General Laws. The Treasurer stated that he 
understands that this law applies only when there are lease agree- 
ments; therefore, the room deposits required by residence halls would 
not be affected. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
security deposits within the purview of 
Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 186, 
Section 15B as amended, required of residents 
of the University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority Project #13 (North Village Apart- 
ments) shall be deposited in an interest- 
earning account which shall be called "North 
Village Security Deposit/Amherst Trust Fund," 
to be invested in such a manner that the 
management of said North Village complies with 
Chapter 186, Section 16B of Massachusetts Gen- 
eral Laws, which stipulated in part, "A land- 
lord of residential real property who holds a 
security deposit pursuant to this section for 
a period in excess of one year from the com- 
mencement of the term of tenancy shall, begin- 
ning with the first day after the expiration of 
such year, pay interest at the rate of five per 
cent per year, payable to the tenant at the end 
of each year," said earned interest to be deposited 
in an account separate from the principal for the 
purpose of interest income payments to the tenants 
as required by law. 

Mr. Campion next turned to the agenda item, Parking 
Garage--Change in Rates (Project 11) recommending an increase from th 
present schedule of 10c per hour (short-term rate), $10 per month 
(students) , and $15 per month (faculty, staff and others long-term 
rate) . He stated that the proposed schedule is based on figures 
projected to 1975, when it is expected that the parking garage will 
become self- liquidating. He also noted that the library will be 
completed within a year followed shortly thereafter by the Fine Arts 
Center. Together with an anticipated stricter enforcement of traffic 
controls and parking on the entire Amherst campus, this should have 
the effect of increasing the daily census in the parking garage. 

Chairman Pumphret remarked that the students have been 
promised that none of their fees will be used to finance the parking 
garage and that an increase in rates is definitely warranted. He 
suggested that the Committee accept the proposed rate scale with the 
condition that a campus committee report back to the Committee with a 
detailed parking and traffic control plan for UM/ Amherst before 
February 1, 1972. 



3837 

Finance Comm. 
12-9-71 



North Village 
Security Deposit 
Amherst Trust 
Fund 



UM/Amherst 
Parking Ga 
Increase i 
Fees 



rage 
n 



3 8 38 



Finance Comm. 
12-9-71 

UM/Amherst-- 
Parking Garage-- 
Increase in 
Fees 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Campion stated that there are already three traffic 
committees: (1) Mr. Ferriter's Parking Committee, (2) a faculty 
committee, and (3) a campus-wide committee of faculty, staff, and 
Union members. Reports are expected within the next three months. 
After further discussion, Chairman Pumphret urged that the three 
committees be coordinated and submit the aforementioned campus-wide 
uniform parking proposal before February 1. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they recommend to the University of Massa- 
chusetts Building Authority the adoption of 
the following fee schedules for the Campus 
Center Parking Garage, known as the Eleventh 
Project of the Authority, effective on January 1, 
1972, or as soon thereafter as the proper approval 
has been secured from the appropriate Federal body: 



Daily Rate: 



All Cars: 



Parking Garage Fees 



15c per hour 

75c maximum for the first 12 hours 

$1.50 maximum for 24 hours 



Fixed daily rate ($1.00 per day - hotel guests only) 

Monthly Rates : 

Students, faculty and staff: $15 per month (inside 
lower level) 



Students, faculty and staff: 
rooftop level) 

It was also moved, seconded, and 



$10 per month (outside 



f 



VOTED : That, in consideration of the increasing 

seriousness of traffic control and parking 
conditions at UM/Amherst together with fin- 
ancial and manpower requirements attendant 
thereto, Vice Chancellor Campion is instructed 
to arrange for the presentation of an effective 
total parking and traffic control plan at 
UM/Amherst for consideration by this Committee 
prior to the beginning of the second semester 
of the academic year 1971-1972. 

President Wood noted that the plan would not necessarily 
be placed into effect at that time, but should be ready for con- 
sideration by the Committee. He reminded Vice Chancellor Campion to 
consult with Acting Chancellor Bromery and to keep Secretary McCartney 
informed of developments. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Campion presented the request from the Amherst campus 
for the transfer of funds from account 01 to account 02, as antic- 
ipated in the October 7 operating budget document. 

ON motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the transfer between subsidiary accounts 
of $323,400 from account 01 to account 02, UM/Amherst. 

The transfer voted above will provide for 
the following: 

$30,000 for sick leave replacements; 
$26,500 for sabbatical leave replacements; 
$163,500 for additional overtime requirements; 
also $103,400 for temporary positions in the 
Offices of the President and the Secretary. 

Mr. Phillips presented a request for a transfer in the 02 
appropriation for the President's Office to meet the projected cost 
of overtime for FY 1972. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the transfer of $1,030 from account 01 
to account 02 in the Office of the President 
(account 7410-0000) . 



Vi 

Disadvantage 
$440,000 for 
$260,000 inc 
one- third to 
the $440,000 
sources for 
appropriatio 
aid costs 



ce President Phillips also requested a transfer for the 
d Student Program. This appropriation was increased from 

FY 1971 to $700,000 for FY 1972. Although the 
rease was needed in the 13 account, it was appropriated 
03 and two-thirds to 13, the same split as was made of 
for FY 1971. In addition, while there are other 
the tutoring and counseling costs of the Program, this 
n is the principal source of state funds for the financia . 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the transfer of $186,000 from 
account 03 to account 13 in the Office of 
the President for the Disadvantaged Student 
Program. 

Mr. Stockwell of UM/Worcester than presented Dean Soutter's 
request for transfers from account 01 to various accounts of the Med- 
ical School. Chairman Pumphret and President Wood took strong 
sxception to the fact that the Committee and the Office of the 
President had not been informed in advance on the details of the 
various transfers. 



Finance Comm. 
12-9-71 

Office of the 

President-- 

Transfers 

Between 

Subsidiary 

Accounts 01 to 

02 



Office of the 
President- 
Transfers Between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 03 to 13 



UM/Medical 
School-- 
Proposed Trans- 
fers between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 



3840 

Finance Comm. 
12-9-71 

UM/Medical 

School-- 

Proposed 

Transfers between 

SubsidigdWMiTTEE 

Accounts 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Stockwell indicated that payment of overdue bills is 
being delayed; also that, although the required Trustee procedure 
may not have been adhered to, the Dean had discussed budget items 
with various persons. In view of the apparent misunderstanding and 
the urgent need for the transfers, Chairman Pumphret proposed that 
the Committee hold a special meeting immediately preceding the full 
Board meeting on December 28 for the purpose of acting on the Medica 
School transfers. In the meantime, Dean Soutter will transmit 
backup information as requested. Secretary McCartney will, in the 
near future, reissue the memorandum of Trustee approved procedures 
for placing matters on the agendas of Trustee committees and meeting^ 
of the full Board. 

Trustee Knowles urged everyone to read the article about 
Dr. Plimpton under Medicine in the current issue of TIME - She 
also requested that the Committee have information at least 24 hours 
in advance concerning changes in the investment portfolio recommended 
by investment counsel. Treasurer Johnson will coordinate this matte: - 
with Standish, Ayer and Wood. In addition, Mrs. Knowles expressed 
her preference for convening afternoon Trustee committee meetings 
not later than 1 p.m. to avoid traffic delays for Trustees in transil: 
from distant areas of the state. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 



r 




Secretary, Board of Tru 






t 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

December 15, 1971, 11:00 a.m., President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret 
Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson; Secretary McCartney; 
Assistant Secretary Rawn, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Sandwen, Shaler 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Vice 
President Lashman; Mr. Cass, Mr. Kaplan, Mrs. Holden 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery; Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and Provost Gluckstern, Vice 
Chancellor for Administrative Services Campion; Acting 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Gage, Associate Provos 
Woodbury; Professor Burroughs, representing the Faculty 
Senate. 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Dean of Faculty and 
Provost Marshall 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



11:15 a. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



The first order of business was a request from Professor 
Joseph D. Burroughs to read a brief, prefacing statement regarding 
a paper entitled, " Special Report of the UM/A Faculty Senate 
Representative to the Board of Trustees ," attached as Document 
T72-028 . This document was then distributed to members of the com- 
mittee as a response from the Faculty Senate to the Board's desire 
to know whether or not the Amherst faculty continues to be concerned 
with the issues raised by the initial report of the Committee of 
Concern. 

Chairman Healey accepted Professor Burroughs' remarks with 
thanks. He indicated that the agenda item relating to the Committee 
of Concern would be taken up in executive session at the end of the 
meeting. 

Dean Soutter discussed the need for the provision of 
interior furnishing and decoration consulting services for the main 
building at the Medical School. Discussions with the firm of Camp- 
bell, Aldrich and Nulty indicated that such consultation services 
would cost more than $30,000. It was brought out that the consulting 
services would not include the actual purchase of the equipment or 



3811 



UM/Amherst-- 
Statement of 
Committee of 
Concern 



UM/Worcester- 

Interior 

Decorating 

Consulting 

Services 



3842 



Exec. Coram. 
12-15-71 

UM/Worcester-- 

Interior 

Decorating 

Consul t^iV&nTTEE 

Services 



UM/Worcester-- 
Gift of Loam to 
Little League 



Policy Regarding 
Conflict of 
Interest/ 
Nepotism 
Doc. T72-029 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



the drawing up of bid specifications required by the state. There- 
fore, the consulting services computed on a percentage-of-cost 
basis should be less than the normal 3-5%. Also the state was 
likely to be upset by this additional contract with Campbell, 
Aldrich & Nulty after some of the other cost averages assumed in 
the past. 

Finally, the Committee requested Dean Soutter to ask 
Campbell, Aldrich & Nulty if they would handle the interior design 
consultations on the building for a lower fee than had been dis- 
cussed heretofore. At the same time, the exact cost of such 
services should be determined; also, whether they would be provided 
for the hospital. 

After short discussion, the Committee agreed that there 
was no opposition to the donation of a small amount of loam to the 
Worcester Little League. The only problem relates to the legality 
of such a gift. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
subject to assurances of counsel on the 
legality of the procedure, the Dean of the 
Medical School be authorized to transfer a 
quantity of loam from the Medical School site 
to the City of Worcester, with the request 
that said loam be made available at no charge 
to the Worcester Little League. 

President Wood reported that he has had a cordial meeting 
with Mrs. Salzman. He then presented a recommended policy statement, 
" Interpretation of University Policy on Discrimination and Conflict 
of Interest ," attached as Document T72-029 . 

Chairman Healey asked that the word "conflicts" on line 
six of paragraph six be changed to "controversies" or "differences" 
as suggested by Trustee Rowland. Trustee Troy, under whose committed 
this material originated, pointed out that the document calls for a 
change in policy from emphasis on nepotism to delineation of conflict 
of interest in resolving these cases. 

In response to a question regarding the unresolved cases 
discussed in paragraph six of the proposed policy statement, Presi- 
dent Wood pointed out that there were currently only a few unre- 
solved cases which have issues touching on this entire conflict of 
interest/nepotism question. He expressed confidence that these 
cases could be worked out administratively. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve the policies and procedures on 
discrimination and conflict of interest as 
set forth in numbered paragraphs one through 
six inclusive of a memorandum entitled 
"Interpretation of University Policy on Dis- 
crimination and Conflict of Interest" (revision 
of December 9, 1971 - Document T72-029 ) from 
President Wood to the Executive Committee, with 
the word "differences" substituted for the word 
"conflicts" in numbered paragraph six on page 
two. 

President Wood set forth merely for discussion the back- 
ground regarding the Marine Recruitment incident at UM/Boston on 
December 7, 1971. 

At 10:00 a.m. a group of twelve students "confronted" the 
Marine recruiters; that group grew to 150 students by 1:45 p.m. 
when the Marines left the campus. 

Dean Marshall pointed out that a staff member of the 
University finally asked the Marines if they had conferred with 
everyone who wanted to talk recruitment and asked if: they were 
"willing to leave" since they had finished their official business. 
Everyone on the Committee acknowledged the worry about the effect 
of this incident on HEW grants to the University in light of the 
regulation which permits that federal agency to withhold funds from 
any campus where military personnel are not allowed to recruit. 
Even greater concern was expressed about the relationship of this 
incident to the "open campus" concept of the University, endorsed 
by the Trustees several years ago. 

Chancellor Broderick made several points: on December 9, 
1971, the University Senate, UM/Boston, voted to prohibit all 
recruiting (military or otherwise) on campus. At that meeting, the 
Chancellor pointed out that in 1968/69 the Faculty and Student 
Senates had adopted a policy of an "open campus" with provision for 
changes in this policy by referendum. No such referendum has been 
held. He also pointed out that the University Senate's vote was 
purely a recommendation. Despite this, the University Senate passed 
its resolution. The Committee then reaffirmed its basic policy set 
forth most recently in 1967 that the University of Massachusetts has 
an open campus; also, that the University is public property, and 
that no one has the right to prohibit any law-abiding group from 
the campus. At this point, it was felt that a reaffirmation of the 
"open campus" policy was all that was necessary in this situation. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

reaffirm its position of December 18, 1967, with 
regard to maintaining a climate for the free 



3843 



Exec. Comm. 
12-15-71 

Policy 
Regarding 
Conflict of 
Interest/ 
Nepotism 



Doc. T72-029 



UM/Boston-- 
Marine 
Recruitment 
Incident 



3844 

Exec. Comra. 
12-15-71 

UM/Boston-- 
Marine Recruitmenjt 
Incident 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
School of 
Education and 
Stevens College, 
Inc. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

exchange of ideas at the University, also, 
specifically, within the laws of the Common- 
wealth affecting free access to public property 
by all law-abiding citizens, to reaffirm that 
the campuses of the University of Massachusetts 
are open to the conduct of legitimate public 
business including interviews for student job 
placement purposes by private commercial and 
industrial organizations and by agencies of the 
federal government. 

The President presented a proposal made by the School of 
Education to assume control of Stevens College, Inc., a small business 
college in Hubbardston, Massachusetts, an institution with severe 
financial problems. The proposal was for the School of Education to 
assume control of Stevens College until September 1972 with the pro- 
vision that a re-evaluation of the program be made and a decision 
regarding its continuation during the summer of 1972. 

Associate Provost Woodbury pointed out that the purpose 
of the proposal was to give students in the higher education program 
of the School of Education real-life experience in the operation of 
an institution of higher education. This would replace the more 
traditional internship experiences so prevalent today. 

After extended discussion, Chairman Healey expressed the 
sense of the Committee that this project presented too many potentia 
problems. The Committee was not willing to recommend the allocation 
of funds for developing relationships with another institution whose 
financial stability appears uncertain. 

While recognizing the quality of certain innovative pro- 
grams at the School of Education, the Committee still felt that the 
administration on each campus should be informed of prospective pro- 
grams early enough in the planning stages so that negotiations with 
outside groups are not carried too far and then rejected with the 
attendant waste of hard work and time. 

It was agreed that President Wood and Acting Chancellor 
Bromery will draft a statement of precise requirements for con- 
sideration by the Committee before a decision is made regarding the 
Stevens College proposal. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
discussing certain personnel matters along with 
the draft of a response to the UM/ Amherst Committee 
of Concern. 

It was later 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of recommending a personnel action to the Board 
of Trustees. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
William L. Rawn, III, recently appointed 
Assistant Secretary of the University, be 
named an Assistant Secretary of the Board 
of Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:35 p.m. 





Robert J. /McCartney 
Secretary, -Aboard of Trustee's 




I 



3845 



Exec. Comm. 
12-15-71 



1 



3846 



COMMITTEE 



Progress Report-' 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 

(Doc. T72-027) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
December 15, 1971, 1:15 p.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland, President Wood; Trustees Abrams, Chandle 
Sandwen, Shaler, Snowden; Secretary McCartney, Miss Pugh, 
recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Troy 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, aid Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Kaplan, Mr. Boardman, 
Student Intern, Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor for Student Affairs Gage; members of the Pan-campus 
Study Group; Mr. Lynch, Mr. Chandler, Miss Newby, 
Mr. Preston 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Mr. Sullivan, Director 
of Student Affairs; members of the Pan-campus Study Group; 
Dr. Pryor, Messrs. Chapman, Smith, Yenawine, Bena 

Consultant: Mr. Lyons 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 1:45 p.m. The 
only agenda item was the progress report of the President's Working 
Group on University Counseling, Advising, and Support Services, 
chaired by Dr. Gage, Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, 
UM/Amherst. 

General introductions were made of the Trustee Committee 
and the Study Group. Mrs. Rowland thanked the working group for the 
excellent report ( Document T72-027 ) that was submitted especially 
under limited time constraints. The Chairman said that the Com- 
mittee would have to focus on where we should go from this point. 

At the request of the Chairman, Dr. Gage began the dis- 
cussion with an introduction of the working group's progress and 
their report. The group agreed that they should not be looking for 
more solutions to the problems. Rather, the focus should be on the 
causes of these problems, especially acute minority problems. The 
Vice Chancellor stated that it has been exciting to work with such 
a diverse group expressing wide creativity and concern. 

There have been three reports submitted to the Committee: 

(1) an outline of the group's deliberations and recommendations; 

(2) a response of the minority members of the group, and (3) a com- 
bined restatement of recommendations. Dr. Gage said that the study 
group feels that this is an interim report. Between now and January 
a more defined document would be prepared. Continued planning will 



1, 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

take place through the spring semester, allowing input from the 
campuses. The study group was concerned about the Committee's 
reactions to the report as well as some direction for the future. 

General discussion followed. Dr. Bromery emphasized to the 
Committee that the response from the minority members of the group is 
not a minority report, but is endorsed by the entire study group. 
The Acting Chancellor suggested that some of the recommendations in 
the report can be implemented on the campuses without Board of Truste|e 
approval. 

Trustee Snowden expressed concern regarding the absence of 
representatives from the Medical School campus on the study group. 
Since the Worcester campus is so new, Mrs. Snowden felt that it would 
be extremely important for them to become involved in the discussions 
as they develop and not just accept the recommendations of the group. 

In response to Trustee Abrams' concern about counseling in 
the junior and senior high school level, discussion focused on some 
of the programs already begun regarding recruitment of minority stu- 
dents and counseling; for example, Upward Bound. Acting Chancellor 
Bromery stressed that the University should increase its admission of 
minority students, even beyond the scope of special programs like 
CCEBS . It was also observed that the W. E. B. Dubois Department of 
Afro-American Studies, UM/Amherst, has begun a program in Springfield 
preparing students at the junior and senior high school levels. 
Trustee Abrams pointed out that Cornell Medical School has a program 
in which minority students are counseled in high schools and later 
accepted into the Medical School. 

The Committee agreed to review the Gage Report recommendatif >n •-, 
one by one so there would be an opportunity to ask questions of the 
members of the working group and to respond to them. Dr. Gage said 
that there was no ranking of importance in the recommendations as all 
of them are considered essential to a total program. The omission of 
any one would be serious, he said. Additionally, Dr. Gage disclosed, 
two new recommendations have been added to the report. 

The Vice Chancellor noted that the study group has not yet 
had time to share this document with people on both campuses. They 
intend to do so as part of the next phase of the group's work. They 
will also be gathering supplementary data regarding more specific 
needs, etc., in the next six to eight weeks. 

Discussion then followed on the recommendations. These 
included revision of the admissions programs, the retraining of 
faculty, establishing an Office of Affirmative Action; also, develop- 
ment of student input and encouragement of student initiated programs 
and the involvement of minority students at all levels of the Univer- 
sity's power structure. It was observed that there is real need for 
redefining the needs of students, especially minority students, 
entering into the University. 



381? 



Student Act. 
12-15-71 

Progress Report- 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 



3848 



Student Act. 
12-15-71 

Progress Report-- 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University. „„ 

COMMITTEE 

Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



On the subject of faculty participation in this effort, 
Dr. Broderick expressed concern that the Committee would have to 
come up with some really persuasive arguments in order to involve 
them. Acting Chancellor Bromery pointed out that we have started 
to implement this idea with the Board of Trustee vote mandating the 
academic component of the University community to get involved in th^ 
living- learning aspect of the institution. 

Chairman Rowland suggested that Chairman Troy of the 
Trustee Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy respond since 
these recommendations relate directly to his Committee. Mr. Troy 
said that he was sympathetic to these recommendations; however, he 
stressed that the University should be concerned primarily with the 
standard and quality of education that students receive. He added 
that educational programs structured mainly around social action 
programs had to be especially careful to maintain and safeguard the 
values intrinsic to a liberal arts education. 

It was mentioned that one of the main thrusts of the 
original report was the need to develop the utilization of students 
in new ways somewhat like para-professionals. Dr. Gage said that we 
should not depend only on traditionally created and trained pro- 
fessionals. There is a need to find new ways to provide these 
services. 

President Wood observed that the pan-campus study group 
project originated with two Trustees who had expressed concern for 
the campus experience of minority groups. The President stated that 
he regarded the character of this work, its potential importance, anc. 
its impact on the University structure as one of the most significant 
efforts of his eighteen months in office. Its scope is pan-campus 
in character; it responds to Trustee concerns. The President went 
on to say that the most critical work of the study group lies ahead 
in terms of identification of needs, pinpointing of details, etc. 
He pointed out that the benefits from this report go far beyond 
advantages to minority students and include the entire University. 

The President suggested that Trustees Rowland and Troy 
might wish to make special arrangements for broadened Trustee 
participation in further study and investigation of this matter. 
Chairman Rowland responded that this report began in the Student 
Activities Committee and has now progressed to include items that 
belong in the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee. She suggested 
a joint meeting of the two committees that would be convened possibl} 
sometime in January. 

On behalf of the Committee, Chairman Rowland indicated to 
the study group the Committee's appreciation and warm reception of 
the work accomplished to date. She urged continuation of the work 
already begun and looks forward to the joint meeting in January. 



F 



F 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Snowden re-emphasized a point made by the Presi- 
dent regarding the importance of the manner in which the recommen- 
dations of the report are presented to the campuses. She feels 
that a persuasive strategy needs to be developed. 

Dr. Gage said that, since the group now has another task 
ahead of it for January, no further time should be spent revising 
the present report. The document should be considered the primary 
source on the statement of purpose. The Vice Chancellor also sug- 
gested that one of the next steps would be to present the report to 
the faculty. 

Chairman Gage of the study group suggested that it would 
be preferable to have the joint Committee meet sometime in February 

Chairman Rowland, noting with pleasure that this had been 
an informative and productive meeting, informed the Acting Vice 
Chancellor that the joint Committee would be on call to meet at the 
convenience of the study group in February, 1972. 

With regard to funding the work of the study group, 
President Wood indicated he "would be responsive to Dr. Gage's 
responsible request." 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:20 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretar 




rtney 

of Trustees 



3 8 49 

Student Act, 
12-15-71 



Progress Report- 
President 1 s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 



3 8 50 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester — 
Transfers 
between 
Subsidiary 
Accounts 
(Doc. T72-030) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
December 28, 1971, 11:30 a.m., Statler Hilton, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustees Frechette, 
Knowles, Rowland; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; 
Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Shaler 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips 

UM/ Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery; Professor Burrough 
representing the Faculty Senate; Professor Burke, 
Mr. Darland 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter, Associate Dean Stockwell; 
Mr. Cathey, Controller 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 11:35 a.m. 

The Committee had previously received for review a detailei 
accounting of the Medical School's " FY 1972 Maintenance Budget and 
Needed Transfers " (Doc. T72-030 ) . Mr. Stockwell indicated that this 
covers all projections through March 31, 1972, and for some items 
through June 30, 1972. He stated, however, that they will submit 
another request later for additional transfers through the last 
quarter of the fiscal year. 

Trustee Pumphret stressed the importance of contacting the 
Office of the President before making a commitment requiring a trans 
fer between subsidiary accounts. This procedure applies to all cam- 
puses of the University. Dr. Soutter explained that, during the 
present period of development, it has occasionally been impossible 
to present accurate figures until after a commitment has been made 
(i.e., key faculty appointments) but that the Medical School has 
always stayed within its overall allocation. 

It was agreed that President Wood will issue an instruction 
memorandum to all campuses to clarify the proper procedure and to 
ensure that, by the time requests for transfers between subsidiary 
accounts come to the Finance Committee, they can normally be treated 
as routine transactions. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the following transfers between subsidiary 
accounts at the Medical School, UM/Worcester as 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



detailed in Doc. T72-030 : 

From 01 to 03 

From 01 to 08 

From 01 to 16 

Total 



$ 90,000 

8,000 

30,000 



$ 128,000 
The meeting was adjourned at 11:47 a.m. 






3851 



Finance Comm. 
12-28-71 

UM/Worcester-- 
Transfers 
between 
Subsidiary- 
Accounts 
(Doc. T72-030) 



>ert J. 'McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustee 



3852 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Approval of 
Departmental 
Status for the 
Linguistics 
Program 
(Doc. T72-032) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POtTCY 
December 28, 1971, 11:45 a.m., Statler Hilton, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Carman, Maginnis, 
Shaler, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Frechette, Rowland 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost Gluckstern; Acting Vice Chancellor for Student 
Affairs Gage; Professor Burroughs, representing the 
Faculty Senate; Professor Freeman, Chairman, Linguistics; 
Professors Burke and Wellman 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:50 a.m. 

Mr. Troy introduced the only item on the agenda: Approval 
of Departmental Status for the Linguistics Program , UM/ Amherst 
(Doc. T72-032 ) . He noted that this change is being recommended by 
the Academic Matters Committee of the Faculty Senate. 

Professor Freeman, Chairman of the Linguistics Program, 
reported an undergraduate enrollment of about 600, adding that their 
staffing is adequate at the present time. At the graduate level, 
the program ranks nationally among the top offerings in this field. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve departmental status for the Linguistics 
Program, UM/Amherst. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:55 a.m. 





Cartney 
Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POil.iCv 
January 17, 1972; 12:30 p.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Croce, Lambson, 
Maginnis, Sandwen, Shaler; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney, Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, 
Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost Gluckstern, representing Acting Chancellor Bromery; 
Dr. Jeremiah Allen, Dean, Humanities and Fine Arts; Dr. 
Mortimer Appley, Dean, Graduate School; Dr. Warren Anderson 
Chairman, Comparative Literature Program; Dr. Gilbert Lawall, 
Assoc. Chairman for Classics; Dr. Conrad Wogrin, Director, 
Computing Center 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean of Faculty and 
Provost Marshall; Prof. Ernest Becker, Chemistry; Prof. 
James Broderick, representing UM/B University Senate 

UM /Worcester : Dean Soutter 



3853 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 12:35 p.m. 

President Wood reviewed the fiscal uncertainties at the 
state and national levels leading to his proposal to the full Board 
on December 28 to grant Merit Salary Increments of not more than 
$1,000 to 25 percent of the eligible faculty. At that time action 
was deferred to allow the campuses to submit recommendations to the 
President who will, in turn, present another proposal to the Board 
at its January 28 meeting. The Trustees will also receive a report 
of the campus reviews. Since it is expected that a statewide cost- 
of-living increase will be announced prior to that date, the Board 
will be in a position to determine a policy. Further, the Board will 
be given a clear picture of what basic elements are contained in the 
proposed allocations (genuine merit, adjustment of inequities, in- 
scale professional increases, cost-of-living increases, etc.). 

A widespread and continuing review looking toward develop- 
ment of policy recommendations for next year's merit increments will 
be initiated--their utility and the University's comparative standing 
with other components of higher educational systems within Massa- 
chusetts, in New England and nationally. 

Chairman Troy observed that he could not discern any sub- 
stantive changes from past policy. Dr. Wood reiterated his intention 
that the Trustees, as well as the press, be fully informed on the 
details of both the cost-of-living and the merit increases. 



Merit Salary 
Increments 



3854 



F & EP Comm. 
1-17-72 

UM/ Amherst -- 
Approval of a 
Ph.D. Program in 

CompUtedoMMITTEE 

and Information 
Science 
(Doc. T72-039 ) 



UM/Amherst-- 
Departmental 
Status for 
Classics 
(Doc. T72-041) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Dr. Gluckstern then presented the proposal for the 
Approval of a Ph.D. Program in Computer and Information Science 
(Doc. T72-039 ) . This has been favorably evaluated for the quality 
of the program, the people in it, and its objectives. Computer and 
Information Science is a new field and offers good job opportunities 
The present faculty of nine is high in quality and is expected to 
expand gradually to about 18. Equipment has been purchased from 
the building fund, with additional assistance up to about 40% 
expected from the National Science Foundation. 

Dean Appley noted that the Chairman, Dr. Michael Arbib, 
who is internationally known, has been moving toward development of 
information systems and a cybernetics program. Also, Professor 
Wogrin commented that the Ph.D. program will now permit broadening 
into the neural activities where psychology and zoology will be 
major sources for research. 

President Wood pointed out that cost implications are 
becoming more and more important when considering expansion of any 
program; however, development of a fine computer science program 
affords the University an opportunity to achieve a national reputa- 
tion in this field. Dean Appley concurred that this was a prime 
consideration in bringing the proposal to the Committee. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

* VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the Ph.D. Program in Computer and Information 
Science at UM/Amherst , as detailed in Document T72-039 . 

Chairman Troy then invited Dr. Lawall to speak on behalf 
of granting Departmental Status for Classics (Doc. T72-041 ) . The 
program began about five years ago as part of the then Romance 
Languages Department and is now ready for independent status. It 
has its own faculty and full undergraduate program, enrollment having 
grown from 114 to 1200. No additional faculty is needed at the 
present time. 

Mr. Troy expressed some doubt about the present potential 
of career opportunities in the state for high school teachers of 
Latin. Professor Lawall reported that there were adequate placement 
opportunities. He hoped that interest would develop in combining 
the linguistics with study of the history of classical civilization. 
In response to a query from Trustee Maginnis, he stated that instruc 
tion in Armenian is privately funded. Dean Marshall indicated 
similar support at UM/Boston. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 



* See page 3548 of full Board of Trustee minutes of 1-28-72. Vote 
approves establishment of the Master of Science and Doctor of 
Philosophy in Computer and Information Science at UM/Amherst. 



P 



I 



! 



I 1 



COMMITTEE 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they approve Departmental Status for Classics 
at UM/ Amherst, as detailed in Document T72-041 . 

The agenda item, Creation of a Department of Comparative 
Literature (Doc. T72-040 ) , was presented by Dr. Anderson. He stated 



that the program is operating as a department, has an exceptionally 
fine staff, and looks forward to an increasingly vigorous graduate 
program. Responding to a question from Trustee Croce, Vice Chan- 
cellor Gluckstern said the proposed change in status carries advan- 
tages in recruitment of high-quality faculty and in providing nationa 
standing with other comparable units. Dean Allen concurred that 
Classics is already a department with its own chairman, faculty, and 
budget. Responding to a query from Trustee Lambson on the origins 
and development of such a program, Dr. Gluckstern explained that in 
the beginning, a group of faculty responds to an area of student 
interest. If the original courses prove successful, then the subject 
may become a discipline and may even go on to obtain national recog- 
nition. 



Following further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Creation of a Department of Compar- 
ative Literature at UM/Amherst, as detailed in 
Document T72-040 . 

Chancellor Broderick then presented the first IM/Boston 
proposal, at the graduate level--for an M.S. Degree Program in 
Chemistry (Doc. T72-045 ) . Noting implications beyond the approval 
of a single program, he listed three criteria basic to the move: 
(1) a faculty adequate to produce a program of quality befitting 
the University; (2) public demonstration of need for such a program; 
(3) availability of resources to pay for the program (the latter 
responsibility being shared by the Legislature through the Trustees) 
He stressed the importance of a periodic appraisal of programs and 
the withdrawal of those having no demonstrable need. He recommended 
that the Board require all campuses to conduct such a review every 
three to five years. 

For the Chemistry Department at UM/Boston, Dr. Becker 
assured the Committee of their awareness of Chancellor Broderick' s 
concern for such a review, stating that the success of the M.S. 
Program rests with the chemistry faculty. He hopes to have the 
program effective at least by the fall of 1972. 

President Wood reviewed the original projections for 
evaluation of the Boston campus. He stated that Dean Appley has 
been serving on an ad hoc review council to assess UM/Boston' s 
development at the graduate level, along with supplementary relation- 
ships to graduate programs on the Amherst campus. Dr. Wood 



385, 



F & EP Comm. 
1-17-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Departmental 
Status for 
Classics 
(Doc. T72-041) 



UM/Amherst-- 
Creation of a 
Department of 
Comparative 
Literature 
(Doc. T72-040) 



UM/Boston-- 
M.S. Degree 
Program in 
Chemistry 
(Doc. T72-045) 



3856 



F & EP Comm. 
1-17-72 

UM/Boston — 
M.S. Degree 
Program in 
Chemi s t ry 

COMMITTEE 

(Doc. T72-045) 



UM/Worcester-- 
Plans for 
Teaching in the 
Medical School 
(Doc. T72-048) 



UM/ Amherst- - 
Tenure Proposals 
for Dr. Ann F. 
Brentlinger , 
Dr. Nancy Myers, 
Dr. Charlotte 
Spivack 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



encouraged Chancellor Broderick's commitment to evaluation and con- 
tinuing appraisal, predicting the probable discontinuance of some 
graduate programs with no career market during the next two or three 
years. 

Chairman Troy stressed the importance of developing a good 
graduate school at UM/Boston to be available to students who cannot 
afford to attend UM/Amherst. Dr. Becker noted the potential job 
opportunities for chemists in areas of environmental concern. He 
predicted an initial enrollment in the degree program of six to ten 
persons (probably beyond the normal college age) whom the present 
staff and facilities are adequate to handle. 



Following brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded. 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve an M.S. degree program in Chemistry at 
UM/Boston, as detailed in Document T72-045 . 

Dean Soutter then outlined orally the Plans for Teaching 
in the Medical School , UM/Worcester. He will prepare a brief, 
written report on this subject for early distribution to the full 
Board of Trustees and the Administration (Doc. T72-048 ) . Chairman 
Troy thanked Dean Soutter for his helpful and enlightening remarks. 

In line with the voluntary services of doctors to the 
Medical School, Trustee Lambson offered occasional volunteer lecture 
service to the appropriate department (s) of the University, and 
agreed to open his farming operation for occasional visits by 
Economics or Agriculture majors to observe the practical application 
of classroom instruction in the field. 

Mr. Troy inquired about the search for a dean of College 
III. Dr. Wood replied that he has interviewed the five candidates 
recommended by Chancellor Broderick and is in the process of screen- 
ing them on the basis of their availability and program commitment. 
Trustee Troy questioned whether the "modest experimental project" 
voted by the Trustees would actually evolve into College III. The 
President indicated that College III and its concept evolve from the 
Master Plan, but might later be assigned a different name. 

With permission of the Chairman and at Dr. Wood's request, 
Vice Chancellor Gluckstern presented three names for tenure at 
UM/Amherst: Dr. Ann Ferguson Brentlinger, Assistant Professor of 
Philosophy, a full-time faculty member since 1964; Dr. Nancy Myers, 
Associate Professor of Psychology, appointed part-time in 1958; and 
Dr. Charlotte Spivack, Professor, English, appointed part-time in 
1964. The latter two professors will also now become full time as 
permitted under the revised conflict-of-interest policy approved by 
the Trustees on December 28, 1971. 

It was then moved, seconded and 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that tenure 
be granted to Dr. Ann Ferguson Brentlinger, Dr. 
Nancy Myers, and Dr. Charlotte Spivack, UM/Amherst. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 





Robert J. /McCartney fj 
Secretary,' Board of Trustees 



385? 



-7 



F & EP Comm. 
1-17-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Tenure Proposals 
for Dr. Ann F. 
Brentlinger, 
Dr. Nancy Myers 
Dr. Charlotte 
Spivack 



3858 



COMMITTEE 



Progress Report-- 
President ' s 
Working Group on 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-038) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF JOINT AD HOC COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING, 
ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES 

January 17, 1972, 2:30 p.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Co-Chairmen Rowland and 

Troy, President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Croce, Lambson, 
Maginnis, Sandwen, Shaler, Snowden; Assistant Secretary 
Rawn; Miss Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lashman, Mr. 
Kaplan, Miss Lauder 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost Gluckstern, representing Dr. Bromery; Acting 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Gage; Mr. Darland, 
Prof. Acklyn Lynch, representing Dr. Bromery 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Mr. Sullivan, Professor 
Stanley Klein 

UM/Medical School : Dean Soutter 

Consultant : Mr. Lyons 



Acting on behalf of the Co-Chairmen, President Wood con- 
vened the meeting at 2:30 p.m. It was observed by both committee 
Chairmen that the Progress Report of the President's Working Group 
(Document T72-038) covered issues that involved the Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy as well as the Committee on Student 
Activities. Thus, it was decided to form this Joint Ad Hoc Com- 
mittee. 

General discussion followed on the report and its rec- 
ommendations. The Trustees reacted to many of the issues raised by 
the Working Group. Some of the main topics focused upon included 
the percentages of minority group members hired and admitted at the 
University, the nature of outreach programs, needed counseling 
methods, priorities as seen by the Working Group, budgetary consider- 
ations and general student programs. 

Trustee Snowden felt that the entire Board of Trustees 
should make clear its need to deal with the legitimate concerns of 
the students, not just one committee. She expressed a strong con- 
cern that the University must make some changes in the policies whicl 
affect minority students. 



A question was raised regarding the report's recommendatio 
the recruitment and hiring of minority staff and students. Dr. Gage 






is on 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman of the Working Group, responded by pointing out that this 
was a central issue in the Working Group's conceptual base and that 
there was an urgent need for the University to face its minority 
group problems at the root. 

It was observed that the traditional methods of counseling 
were not sufficient. There is a pressing need for an outreach pro- 
gram of some kind as well as the effective use of para-professionals 
in this effort. There was some difference of opinion on the nature 
of such revised counseling activities. 

President Wood asked about any priorities which the 
Working Group might suggest. Dr. Gage said that the report was a 
total package and that he did not feel that any one item had 
priority over any others. All are important components of the 
problem. (See Document T72-038 ) 

Trustee Snowden expressed the need for a certain degree of 
consensus by the Committee on commitment and dedication to a certain 
general philosophy on the subject. 

Mr. Sullivan and Mr. Darland felt that if a single element 
of prime importance could be identified, it would be the increased 
admission of minority students and staff. 

Dr. Gage explained to the Joint Committee that this report 
represented the first stage of the charge that was given to the 
study group. The second stage, already begun, will bring the report 
to the campuses to work on the ideas and recommendations. The third 
part of this project will be an ongoing evaluation of the implemen- 
tation of the report. Dr. Gage also reported that his group believe 
that something must be done and that the President's Working Group 
is now exploring the costs of the steps that might be taken as well 
as costing out additional support services. 

Chancellor Broderick expressed some concern about the 
differences between the Boston and Amherst campuses and the mixing 
of the problems of one campus with the problems of the others. He 
said that we must continue to deal with ongoing counseling services. 
The Chancellor also felt that the primary thrust of the report is in 
the nature of an Affirmative Action program. Dr. Gluckstern noted 
that the campuses could begin implementing some of the recommendatiotis 
of the report immediately. 

Co-Chairman Troy expressed his concern that standards of 
the University continue to be important in any of these discussions. 

President Wood reminded the Committee that, not only was 
a general commitment necessary, but also there were monetary com- 
mitments and choices that would have to be made. He suggested that 
the Joint Committee draft a response indicating its general philos- 
ophical reaction to the finds of the Working Group in order to give 
that body further guidance in its work. 



3859 



Joint Ad Hoc 
Committee on 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
1-17-72 



Progress Report-- 
President ' s 
Working Group on 
Counsel ing, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-038) 



3860 



Joint Ad Hoc 
Committee on 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-038 ) 

COMMITTEE 

Progress Report- 
President' s 
Working Group on 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-038) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Snowden again asked for a genuine commitment from 
the Joint Committee on moving in the direction of resolving minority 
student problems within the University. Although no vote was taken, 
there was a general concurrence on the peed to move affirmatively on 
this matter. 

Dr. Gage, responding to President Wood's suggestion, 
reported to the Committee that his Working Group would present 
another progress report in mid to late February that would deal with 
the second and third stages of the original charge: (a) a report 
on the campuses' reactions and a cost analysis of the recommendation 
and (b) an ongoing evaluation of the implementation of the report. 

Co-Chairmen Rowland and Troy both expressed concern with 
improving all counseling in the University. They both recognize 
that the issue is complicated and that there are different kinds of 
problems that must be dealt with in this process. 

The meeting adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 




Robert J. 'McCartney 
Secretary'/ Board of Trust* 




F 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

January 20, 1972, 9:30 a.m., President's Office, 85 Devonshire St., 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Haigis, President 

Wood; Trustees Chandler, Crowley, Knowles , Maginnis , Pum- 
phret; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Assistant 
Secretary Rawn, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Lashman and 
Phillips, Mr. Cass, Miss Lauder 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost Gluckstern, representing Acting Chancellor Bromery; 
Mr. Littlefield 

UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton, representing ChancellDr 
Broderick; Mr. O'Brien 



3861 



Chairman Haigis called the meeting to order at 9:30 a.m. 
The first order of business was the FY 1973 Capital Outlay Recommen- 
dations ( Document T72-049 ) with presentation by President Wood and 



Vice President Phillips. 

The President noted that the campuses had submitted capital 
outlay proposals totaling $166,698,883. After review and discussion 
with the Chancellors and Dean Soutter, he is recommending a program 
totaling $95,595,000 which breaks down as follows: 



UM/Amherst 

UM/Boston 

UM/Worcester 



$13,445,000 

81,000,000 

1,150,000 



Detailed analysis of the revisions, priority listing of 
projects, etc. is set forth in Document T72-049 . 

The President made it clear that the cut in the School of 
Education capital outlay request represented no disagreement with 
the validity of the School's program and was only a response to the 
Governor's firm posture on state spending. It still permits the 
School of Education to spend $500,000 on planning and working 
drawings. 

With regard to the land acquisition requests made by the 
Worcester campus, Trustee Pumphret expressed concern that the housing 
request at Worcester did not seem to relate to the general overall 
lousing policies at Amherst and Boston. He wanted to know how much 
of the land was to be acquired only for housing. Chairman Haigis 
expressed the hope that perhaps the private sector could take over 
certain of the housing needs of the students at Worcester. President 



Capital Outlay 
Recommendations 
FY 1973 
(Doc. T72-049) 



3862 



B & G Comm. 
1-20-72 

Capital Outlay 
Recommendations 
FY 1973 
(Doc. T72-049 ) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Progress Report 
(Doc. T72-051) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Wood said he would convey these concern 
it clear that the capital outlay submis 
commitment to a student housing project 
generally agreed that the land purchase 
applied not just to housing but also to 
It was also agreed that a feasibility s 
any student housing is built at Worcest 
400 units of housing at Worcester would 
for 15,000 student housing units at Bos 



s to Dean Soutter and make 
sion does not represent a 

at Worcester. It was 
s at Worcester should be 

overall campus development, 
tudy should be made before 
er so that the desire for 

not lead to similar demands 
ton. 



) 



Mr. Littlefield, when asked about the renovation of the 
dormitories at UM/Amherst, pointed out that the work is being done 
with extensive student consultation so that some of the living- 
learning concepts could be integrated into the plans. The renovated 
dormitories would include the provision of both educational and 
avocational programs. Chairman Haigis pointed out that student 
participation in dormitory planning could make the buildings more 
attractive to the students. 

Further discussion focused briefly on other items in the 
Amherst capital outlay requests, which were listed in priority order 
of preference. 

With regard to UM/Boston plans, Mr. O'Brien pointed out 
that the transit link continues to be the main problem facing the 
Columbia Point campus. The MBTA has a contract with Wolmer 
Associates for a study of a transit link to the campus. Mr. Lashman 
pointed out that the University is trying to encourage the private 
development of housing at UM/Boston through rehabilitation and new 
construction. Both the Boston business community and the local 
community leadership have been consulted on this matter. The Univer- 
sity hopes to establish a third party non-profit development corpo- 
ration which could facilitate the development and improvement of 
housing in the area as well as aiding in the development of commercial 
facilities near the Columbia Point Campus. 

Trustee Knowles urged the Boston campus to look into the 
effectiveness of its rodent control program at Columbia Point. It 
was her impression from a personal visit there on Wednesday that the 
problem was increasing. 

On motion made, and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the FY 1973 Capital Outlay Recommendations, 
as detailed in Document 172-049. 

Mr. Littlefield gave a monthly progress report on the 
status of Amherst construction projects (Doc. T72-051 ) . 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Mr. O'Brien gave a monthly progress report on the status 
of the Columbia Point construction projects (Doc. T72-052 ) . He 
pointed out that a recent management report expressed doubts that 
occupancy could take place at the Columbia Point campus in 
September of 1973. He said that this is a result of two factors: 

(1) The Science building construction is losing too many 
days so that by the planned date of occupancy it will really be four 
months behind time. He does not see how this problem will be 
alleviated by 1973, though offices and classrooms (but not labora- 
tories) could perhaps be opened earlier. 

(2) The fire in the College 020 building (Doc. T72-053 ) 
caused extensive damage and it appears that most of the concrete 
shoring in the fire area will have to be removed and replaced. As 
a result, he estimates an additional four-month delay with perhaps 
beneficial or partial occupancy before that time. Trustee Knowles , 
who had visited the site the preceding day, said that she had been 
told the fire would cause only a one or two month delay. She added 
that this estimate was being partly shortened by the very good 
weather so far this winter. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton said that security is of paramoun 
concern at the Columbia Point site. In response to a question about 
changes in security there, he pointed out that a new security con- 
tractor has been hired who continues to employ many of the same 
local residents as before, but is operating under new supervisory 
techniques. At the time of the fire, it was discovered that the 
punch-in clock system was not being used properly. The University 
will make additional recommendations to BBC regarding the improve- 
ment of the security system. 

The library and the College 010 building are on schedule. 
In response to a question, Dr. Hamilton stated that the "critical 
path" personnel at the Boston campus gather their timing data not 
only from the contractors but also from independent reports. 

In response to a question regarding the dredging and the 
filling of the bulkhead around the campus, Mr. O'Brien pointed out 
that such work had been scheduled for completion in the summer of 
1970. Then there developed land complaints from the Boston College 
High School that the dredging and filling was keeping people awake 
at night. Therefore, work was reduced to only one shift per day. 
Now the dredging company has stopped operating for the winter, and 
the office has no accurate estimate of the date of completion on 
this project. The major problem created by this delay is that the 
later settlement of "fill" will create difficulties for the con- 
struction of underground power lines and the roadway from Morrissey 
Boulevard to the campus. 



3863 



B & G Comm. 
1-20-72 

UM/Boston-- 
Progress Report 
Columbia Point 
(Doc. T72-052) 



UM/ Boston- 
Fire Report-- 
College 020 
(Doc. T72-053) 



3864 



B & G Comm. 
1-20-72 

UM/Worcester-- 
Status Report 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Vice President Phillips gave a short report on the status 
of the construction at Worcester. The power plant is ahead of 
schedule. at this moment. Also, the subcontractors' bids are due 
on January 26th and the general contractors' on February 4th for 
the teaching hospital. 



P 



The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 




Robert J. J^cCartney 
Secretary^ Board of Trustee 




I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

January 21, 1972; 1:30 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Pumphret, Troy, 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Sandwen 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Phillips and 
Lashman, Messrs. Cass and Gartenberg 

UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and 
Provost Gluckstern, representing Acting Chancellor Bromery 
Prof. Burroughs, representing the Faculty Senate; Professo 
Burke and Wellman 

UM/ Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton, representing Chan- 
cellor Broderick; Prof. Broderick, representing the Univer 
sity Senate 

UM/Worcester : Dr. Clark, representing Dean Soutter 



Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 1:40 p.m. 

President Wood introduced the discussion on the Selective 
Merit Increment Policy-- 1972 . He reviewed the various national, 
state, and internal situations which had led to the deferment of 
this item from the December 28 Board meeting. After extensive 
further discussion and evaluation, the campuses submitted individual 
proposals as outlined in Document T72-050 , which also includes other 
comments and guidelines. The recommendation to the Committee under 
takes (1) to identify the various components that have been subsumed 
under the merit connotation, (2) to place appropriated funds at the 
disposal of the campuses for distribution at the campus level with 
provision for retroactivity, and (3) to initiate a study process so 
that next year there will not be basic misunderstandings about what 
the appropriation is for and how it is to be allocated. 

Messrs. Burroughs, Burke, and Wellman, as members of the 
Faculty Senate, UM/ Amherst, unanimously approved the proposal now 
before the Committee. Professor Broderick stated that it should 
also be acceptable to the UM/Boston faculty, and Dr. Clark indicated 
that UM/Worcester welcomes the idea of merit increments. 

Chairman Healey noted that, by the granting of percentage 
increases along with merit increments, faculty salaries have been 
brought up to a competitive level over the past several years and 



rs 



3865 



Selective Merit 
Increment 
Policy -- 1972 
(Doc. T72-050) 



3866 



Exec. Comm. 
1-21-72 

Selective Merit 
Increment Policy- 

1972 
(Doc. T72-05 0) 

CUMMII IEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



should now begin to stabilize. He mentioned the possibility of 
budget restrictions this year. The importance was stressed of 
adopting salary and tenure policies which are defensible to other 
universities and, at the same time, fair to the University and to 
the individuals involved. 

President Wood said that his proposal had responded to 
Trustee Pumphret's concern that recommendations for awards be based 
on individual evaluation rather than an automatic percentage; also, 
to the consensus that the University's merit and pay plans should be 
studies within a framework of reasonably strict terms. 

Mr. Pumphret observed that, within the past two years, ver ir 
sizable salary advances have been awarded at the professional level. 
As much as 82 percent of the faculty received merit increments last 
year. He urged a prudent attitude on the part of the Trustees. 
Similarly, Trustee Troy cautioned against the danger of being chal- 
lenged for taking too liberal an approach which could have far- 
reaching adverse effects. 

Vice Chancellors Gluckstern and Hamilton agreed that merit 
increments should not be equated with the system of step increases 
in effect at the nonprofessional level, but should be granted on a 
highly selective basis. Mr. Pumphret added the further warning that 
any attempt to treat merit increments as step increases would lead 
logically to imposition of a six-time limitation on the award. 
Dr. Gluckstern commented that, under a quasi-step-rate system, any 
faculty member not receiving an increment would interpret the deci- 
sion as implying incompetence. He proposed a policy providing a 
sizable minimum increment for worthy achievement during the previous 
year with awards going to a small percentage of each department on 
a selective basis. This should, he said, bring the number of awards 
given down to 60 or 65 percent of the total faculty. On a question 
from Mr. Troy, Dr. Gluckstern stated that the AAUP reports rated 
the University salary level last year as average overall in compar- 
ison with other universities. 



and 



After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded. 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in view 
of the need to serve the many purposes for which the 
University's Merit Increase appropriation was intended, 
the President is authorized to implement a Merit 
Increase Pay Plan for professional employees up to a 
maximum state-funded expenditure of $755,741; and is 
authorized to implement merit increases for professiona 
employees paid from non-state funds at a comparable 
rate. In implementing this plan, the President's 
authority is subject to appropriate Federal Wage 
Stabilization Guidelines. 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee then turned to consideration of Residence 
Status of Foreign Applicants—Medical School , UM/Worcester . Present 
requirements for admission specify "residents of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts who are also citizens of the United States." 

Mr. Cass noted that the policy of retaining the out-of- 
state-student classification through the entire college experience 
(if acceptance was on that basis) would exclude those graduates of 
UM/ Amherst or UM/Boston from the Medical School. He urged establish- 
ment of a clear-cut overall policy and questioned the necessity for 
requiring residency and/or citizenship. 

Dr. Clark reported that applications were refused last year 
from two noncitizens and that a highly qualified applicant awaiting 
citizenship will have to be refused this year. President Wood pro 
posed that the Board act on January 28 in terms of the Medical School 
subject to advice from legal counsel; also, that the Board move 
toward the establishment of an admissions policy for the total Univer- 
sity. The Committee concurred with these proposals. 

Mr. Healey noted that the Medical School has an individual 
problem because the ratio of applicants to acceptances is so much 
greater. He suggested that an ad hoc decision might be arrived at 
to give guidance with certain difficult decisions for the Medical 
School. 

Chairman Healey then requested Committee action on 
Secretary McCartney's recommendation that Assistant Secretary Rawn 
be given stand-by signatory authorization at the direction of the 
Secretary or in his absence. 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize William L. Rawn, III, Assistant Secretary, 
Board of Trustees, as directed by the Secretary or 
in his absence to sign in the name of the Board of 
Trustees of the University of Massachusetts such 
official documents and/or certificates as presently 
require the signature of the Secretary of the Univer- 
sity, and for which authorization has been extended 
to the Secretary of the University by prior votes of 
the Board. 

Chairman Healey then stated that faculty and other non- 
Trustee attendance at full Board meetings has always been encouraged 
The very infrequent executive sessions of that body occur only when 
extremely sensitive items are under consideration, at which times 
the Board goes into executive session under legally provided exclu- 
sions from the Open Meeting Law of the Commonwealth. However, the 
Chairman continued, since Committees are not subject to the require- 
ments of the Open Meeting Law, the respective chairmen should and do 
have the discretion to invite or exclude whom they please. Any 
Trustee is entitled, however, to attend any Committee meeting and its 
executive session. Each chairman is encouraged to limit the admissioh 
of non-Trustees to an executive session to an absolute minimum. 



3867 

Exec. Comm. 
1-21-72 

UM/Worcester— 
Residence Status 
of Foreign 
Applicants- 
Medical School 



William L. Rawn 
Authorization to 
Sign for 
Secretary 



Attendance of 
Faculty and 
Non-Trustees 



3 8 68 

Exec. Comm. 
1-21-72 

Attendance of 
Faculty and 
Non-Trustees 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Healey cautioned that any lack of discretion regarding matters 
of a confidential nature would, of necessity, restrict even 
executive session discussions. 

President Wood expressed the view that faculty should be 
admitted to executive sessions at which matters involving their 
participation are being considered. However, confidential matters 
directly concerning the faculty inevitably call for restricted at- 
tendance. He mentioned that, with student representation on the 
Board, it is understandable that the faculty feel excluded. 

Trustee Troy urged that matters of concern to the faculty 
should be shared with them at the Committee level before going to 
the full Board for action. Mr. Wellman concurred, adding that the 
delay necessitated by formal written communications could be elim- 
inated if a question could be resolved through discussion. Chair- 
man Healey reminded him that a formal resolution of the Faculty 
Senate requires a formal reply. In addition, Mr. Wellman assured 
the Trustees that the faculty would be affirmatively sensitive to 
matters requiring a strict executive session. Mr. Burroughs con- 
tended that his function as liaison person between the UM/ Amherst 
Faculty Senate and the Trustees depends on good communication. He 
offered his full cooperation. Dr. Wood proposed that the Committee 
chairman and/or he himself discuss with the faculty representatives 
what has occurred at closed executive sessions if this seems appro- 
priate and applicable. 

Chairman Healey emphasized that any decision on attendance 
must be made without endangering the right and the freedom of the 
Trustees to speak, together frankly. The authority to restrict 
attendance at an executive session only to Trustees, as necessary, 
must be maintained. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 
of considering personnel matters. 

It was later moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of adjournment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretar 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE MEETING ON GOVERNMENT AND UNIVERSITY 

RELATIONS 

February 10, 1972; 12:30 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston, Mass 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Gordon, President Wood; Trustees Croce, Shaler, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Sandwen 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lashman; Mr. 
Donahue, Director of Institute for Governmental Services, 
Mr. Cass, Executive Assistant to the President; Miss Gill, 
Student Intern 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn, 
Miss Pugh 

UM/ Boston: Vice Chancellor Hamilton 



Chairman Gordon convened the meeting at 12:35 p.m. and 
called on Mr. Cass for a Review of Pending Legislation of interest 
to the University. Discussion centered on bills requiring a strong 
positive or negative position by the Board of Trustees. 

A summary of all bills filed with the Legislature as of 
December 8, 1971, having been distributed, Mr. Cass proceeded to 
make specific comments. It was noted that the unqualified reference 
to the University of Massachusetts in any bill means it would apply 
to all three campuses. 

Regarding the bill to provide funds for land and construction 
of a transit line between Columbia Point and the MBTA station, Vice 
Chancellor Hamilton commented that the MBTA study should be finished 
by June and will probably recommend separated monorail or skytrack 
buses. He noted that the crucial part of this bill is the authority 
to proceed. 

Prof. Donahue elaborated on the proposal for a closed- 
circuit, instructional television network, crediting this idea to 
Deans Picha and Marcus and Professor Segool, Director of Industrial 
Liaison (all in the School of Engineering, UM/Amherst) . This would 
eventually link the University with other state and community col- 
leges and a number of industries in the Commonwealth and would help 
alleviate the pressures for faculty and facilities for the 215,000 
students predicted in institutions of higher learning by 1980. 



3869 



Review of 

Pending 

Legislation 



UM/Boston-- 
Transit Link 



Closed Circuit 
TV 



3870 



Comm. on G & UR 
2-10-72 



Closed Circuit 
TV 

COMMITTEE 



New Industry- 
Incubator 



Tuition 



Other Bills 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Initially, Prof. Donahue foresees use by the Schools of Engineering, 
Business, and Education. Other units on the several campuses may be 
interested in participating. The areas of use would include multi- 
campus lectures by great men and instruction in specialized subjects 
Chairman Gordon cautioned that the cost of transmission would be 
a limiting factor. 

Prof. Donahue also explained the proposal to study the 
feasibility of a New Industry Incubator. This refers to the install^ 
tion of a Quonset hut or similar-size building in which a small busi- 
ness could be launched with help from various appropriate University 
areas , after which it would be moved out into the state to operate 
independently. 

Mr. Cass continued that there are a number of bills filed 
in connection with various aspects of tuition, with the hearing set 
for March 7. Dr. Wood indicated that a position paper will be sent 
to the Trustees which represents the combined thinking of the Presi- 
dent's staff and the President's Council. This will outline the 
various categories of the tuition bills: flat fees, differential by 
types of students, percent of cost to percent of income and some 
options that exist. The President also noted that, in comparison 
with 85 other Land Grant Colleges, the University is low on tuition 
but rather high on board and room. He expressed concern about the 
residential qualifications as applied to tuition, with 18-year-old 
students now eligible to become registered voters wherever they may 
be attending school. Chairman Gordon reported that the Board of 
Higher Education, in terms of its Master Planning Project, will be 
proposing tuition increases this year. Mr. Cass has been in touch 
with Trustees of community and other state colleges as well as the 
Advisory Council of the BHE regarding a common understanding of 
changes needed. 

Trustee Croce urged that it is important to exclude the 
Medical School from any tuition proposals. President Wood stated 
that he hopes that the Board at its February 23 meeting will discuss 
the options and possibilities so that the President can make a public 
statement by March 7. However, he presently does not intend to ask 
the Trustees for a vote. 

Mr. Cass briefly reviewed several other bills pending and 
answered questions from those present. A bill to prohibit concurrent: 
appointment of Trustees on similar boards of colleges or universities 
was mentioned. Information will be requested from our Board members 
in this regard. It is expected that action will be taken on the 
Syrian Church property. An adverse report is expected on the bill 
to add faculty members to the Board of Trustees. 

Replying to a query from Trustee Sandwen regarding a bill 
proposing a course in modern penology at UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, 
President Wood stated that any legislation which specifies detailed 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

curriculum of any kind should be opposed in principle. Mr. Cass 
conveyed to the Joint Committee on Education that the University 
should be permitted to develop its own courses of study as a normal 
part of its autonomy. 

Chairman Gordon then invited Dr. Wood to comment on the 
Governor's budget as it relates to the University. The President 
stated that the expectations of more difficult and stringent circum- 
stances have been confirmed. The budget essentially provides for 
some additions to the professional nonacademic staff and equipment, 
and some other accounts, but it does not authorize about 100 faculty 
positions requested. It was the consensus that, since there was no 
reduction in proposed enrollment, the reduced allocations would of 
necessity affect quality. This will be true especially in relation 
to the education of minority students. 

Trustee Troy expressed grave concern regarding the high 
standards sustained over many years by the Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee and the danger of lowering them, if only temporarily 
Prof. Donahue did not predict any improvement in the fiscal outlook 
in the foreseeable future in view of the financial demands from 
grammar and high schools and from welfare recipients. 

The President indicated that efforts will be made to secure 
a temporary adjustment in the budget to reinstate the new positions 
on the basis of maintaining quality. Trustees Gordon and Troy com- 
mented that the University, though competing with welfare for funds, 
is also assisting in alleviating this burden through curricula involv 
ing that sector of the population in an effort to make them self- 
supporting. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:35 p.m. 




)ert J. ( McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



3871 



Comm. on 
2-10-72 

Bill on 
Curriculum 



G &UR 



387 



■>. 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston-- 
Proposal for 
M.A. Degree 
Program in 
English 
(Doc. T72-078) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL 

POLICY 

February 16, 1972; 12:30 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood 
Trustees Carman, Lambson, Maginnis, Sandwen, Shaler: 
Assistant Secretary Rawn, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor 
Gluckstern 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Marshall; Prof. 
James Broderick; Prof. Nevin Weaver, representing the 
UM/Boston University Senate 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 12:45 p.m. 

Professor James Broderick, Chairman of the English Depart- 
ment at UM/Boston, was requested to report on the proposed M.A. 
Program in English Language and Literature at UM/Boston. Professor 
James Broderick set forth the basic structure of the English pro- 
gram proposal and addressed himself to the question of which students 
would most likely use the M.A. program in English. President Wood 
pointed out that no one on the ad hoc reviewing committee had raised 
issues of quality of the M.A. program in English. They had only 
raised the issues of redundancy and duplication of programs at all 
the universities in the Boston area. He felt that we should be 
searching for graduate programs that could be differentiated from 
other similar programs in the Boston area. He pointed out that this 
proposed program would be the only publicly supported Master's pro- 
gram in English in the Boston area and that it would have flexibility 
that other programs do not have. Dean Marshall pointed out that this 
program would likely be most attractive to potential high school and 
community college teachers in the area. President Wood pointed out 
that this approval does not commit the Board to pursuing a Ph.D. 
Program. Trustee Shaler asked if the outline should include one or 
more courses specifically related to black literature. Professor 
Broderick responded that such courses are being considered. Chair- 
man Troy pointed out that he was not reluctant to approve programs 
which included the growth of graduate study at the UM/Boston campus. 
He said he wanted a "university" at Boston, not just a "college." 
He added that he did not believe that every graduate program decisior 
needed to respond to clear and present employment needs in a particular 
field. He feels that a Ph. D. Program in English is an open questior 
for the future. 



Chairman Troy also made sure that this program would not 
affect the quality of undergraduate teaching or threaten the 15:1 
student-faculty ratio. He stated that the 15:1 ratio is the most 
important issue facing the University at this time. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was moved and seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the establishment of an M.A. Program in 
English Language and Literature at the TJM/Boston 
campus. 

Chairman Troy then called upon Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
to discuss the proposed creation of the title of Teaching Associate 
at the UM/Amherst campus. The Vice Chancellor pointed out that, 
under his proposal, there would be two titles for graduate students 
involved in teaching: Teaching Assistants and Teaching Associates. 
The latter title would be reserved for Teaching Assistants with 
extensive previous experience. It would give graduate students more 
incentive to do a good job of teaching. Related to this will be the 
granting of Distinguished Teaching Awards to Teaching Assistants and 
Teaching Associates at the University. In response to Chairman Troy' 
question, Dr. Gluckstern pointed out that the salary of Teaching 
Associates this year would have been $3600 versus $3200 for Teaching 
Assistants. Next year, the similar figures would be $3800 for Teach- 
ing Associates and $3400 for Teaching Assistants. With reference to 
his memorandum (Doc. T72-064 ) , Dr. Gluckstern clarified the last 
paragraph stating that the plan is to place three or four Teaching 
Associates in a single full-time equivalent salary slot and that is 
what is meant by the $11, 000-$ 16 ,000 figure in that memorandum. 

It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the creation of the Title of Teaching 
Associate at UM/Amherst. 

Chairman Troy next accepted the presentation of the gradu- 
ation lists from both the Amherst and Boston campuses, and such lists 
will be presented for approval at the full Board of Trustees meeting 
next week. 

Dr. Bromery and Dr. Gluckstern notified the Committee that 
a few small revisions to the UM/Amherst Faculty Senate Constitution 
would be presented to this Committee (or to other appropriate 
Trustee Committees) in the very near future. The amendments are 
merely pro forma matters. 

Trustee Lambson requested that dual meetings involving mem- 
bers of the Faculty and Educational Policy Committee and the Joint 
Ad Hoc Committee on Counseling, Advising, and Support Services be 
scheduled in the afternoon hours so that the Joint Committee does 
not feel under time pressure to adjourn. He noted that the Joint 
Committee is handling very important material, and he thought that 
an opportunity for full deliberation should be provided. 



3873 



Comm. on F & EP 
2-16-72 

UM/ Boston- 
Proposal for 
M.A. Degree 
Program in 
English 
(Doc. T72-078) 



UM/Amherst- - 
Creation of 
Title of 
Teaching 
Associate 
(Doc. T72-064) 



UM/Amherst, 
UM/ Boston- 
Graduation 
Lists 



Trustee 
Comments re 
Meeting 
Schedules 



3874 



Comm. on F & EP 
2-16-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Shaler also requested that, if possible, Committee 
meetings be sometimes held in the Amherst area. Other committee 
members also agreed. It was pointed out that one committee meeting 
had been tentatively scheduled for Amherst but, due to a schedule 
conflict, was moved back to Boston. It was indicated that every 
effort would be made to accommodate this request in the future. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:30 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretar 



ees 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE JOINT AD HOC COMMITTEE ON COUNSELING, ADVISING, 

AND SUPPORT SERVICES 

February 16, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Co-chairmen Rowland and Troy 
President Wood; Trustees Carman, Chandler, Lambson, Magin- 
nis, Sandwen, Shaler, Snowden; Mr. Callahan, representing 
Commissioner Sullivan; Secretary McCartney, Miss Pugh, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Edelman and 
Lashman, Mr. Kaplan 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Gage, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, Prof. Lynch, 
Messrs. Chandler and Darland 

UM/ Bos ton : Chancellor Broderick 

Consultant: Mr. Lyons 



Acting on behalf of Co-chairmen Troy and Rowland, Presi- 
dent Wood convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. The sole agenda item 
was the second stage Progress Report of the President's Working 
Group on Counseling, Advising, and Support Services (Doc . T72-076 ) . 
Copies of a draft memorandum on an Affirmative Action Program in 
Employment were distributed. The President remarked that this memo 
was not before the Committee for approval, but for information. It 
has yet to be presented to the President's Council and the campuses 
for comments and reactions. Attached to the draft is the Department 
of Labor Regulations pursuant to Executive Order 11246 on Affirmative 
Action in Employment. Dr. Wood informed the Committee that this 
draft responds to the executive order and its regulations as well 
as taking into account the discussions presently underway on the 
Amherst campus. It also focuses the ongoing concerns of the Working 
Group more appropriately into the areas of admissions, counseling, 
and advising. 

The President then called on Chairman Gage of the Working 
Group to comment on the report. Dr. Gage said that he assumes 
responsibility for this report as it has not been reviewed by all 
members of the Group. He noted that the Amherst campus, to date, 
has made the most positive response. He mentioned that material 
similar to the Affirmative Action memo had been presented to the 
Working Group for review at its last meeting. 



387 



D 



Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



3876 



Joint Ad Hoc 

Comm. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working c< gr | o,yp E ^n 
University- 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Co-chairman Troy queried at what point before final recom- 
mendation would the faculty at the campuses be consulted. Dr. 
Bromery responded that there are faculty members on the Working 
Group. Also, Dr. Gage has reported the Group's first Progress 
Report to the UM/Amherst Faculty Senate. The Acting Chancellor said 
that he views the reports as summaries of progress, and when they 
are final they will go to the Faculty Senate or perhaps to a general 
faculty meeting. 

Trustee Shaler observed and Dr. Bromery agreed, that the 
report had been received with enthusiasm at the Amherst campus by 
faculty and students alike. Dr. Broderick added that Dr. Klein, 
Chairman of the UM/Boston University Senate Committee on Counseling 
and Advising, is also a member of the Group. 

Discussion then followed regarding participation of repre- 
sentatives from both campuses. President Wood pointed out that 
Chancellor Broderick' s memo (Doc. T72-080 ) proposes a separate actioiji 
process for the Boston campus. This process would bring in outside 
consultants to make recommendations for the campus. Dr. Broderick 
informed the committee that he had no intention of departing from a 
pancampus idea of studying counseling, advising, and support services 
He also pointed out, however, that it is clear that there are differ 
ent problems on each campus. As a result, UM/Boston plans to develop 
its own recommendations, and they will be reviewed by the President's 
Working Group before presentation to the Trustee Joint Ad Hoc Commit 
tee. 

Co-chairman Rowland pointed out that the role of the 
Trustees is that of formulating policy rather than implementation. 
The President said the problem is not so much one of separate char- 
acteristics of the campuses as it is one of general availability of 
personnel and budgetary support. 

Trustee Snowden expressed disappointment that the material 
supplied to the Working Group by UM/Boston was less substantive than 
that forthcoming from UM/Amherst. Trustee Shaler hoped that the two 
campuses would develop a similar general philosophy in these matters, 
though the process of implementation might differ. 

Dr. Broderick asserted that the Boston campus felt apart 
and separate. The type of student at UM/Boston is quite different, 
he said, from that attending UM/Amherst. For example, 76 percent of 
the UM/Boston students work part time and 33 percent work more than 
20 hours each week. To provide counseling services for a nonresi- 
dential student population is a quite different problem from that 
encountered at UM/Amherst. Also, Dr. Broderick said, the Boston 
campus counseling operation is not fully developed. There are only 
22 positions at this time. Dr. Broderick also commented that the 
Boston campus does not desire to take a separate position. The 
Chancellor briefly described the purpose of using counseling con- 
sultants for the Boston campus. He stated that his present services 
are regarded as unsatisfactory and inadequate. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood expressed disappointment that the Boston 
campus responses could not be incorporated into the total report. 

Co-chairman Troy agreed with Chancellor Broderick on his 
point that the need for counseling, advising, and support services 
for students are University-wide. 

Co-chairman Rowland again pointed out that the Trustees 
are mainly interested in policy. She expressed deep concern that 
the background of the whole project began last June with Trustee 
Snowden's concern for the black students at the Boston campus. She 
said it will now be perhaps a year before improved services are 
inaugurated at the Boston campus. She recognizes the quite substant 
differences between both campuses. 

Chancellor Broderick shares the Trustees' and the Presi- 
dent's disappointment with the present Progress Report before the 
Committee. He asked the President to share his memo of February 15 
with the Joint Ad Hoc Committee. Continuing, he said he feels that 
the Working Group recommendations to date have not followed the 
original charge as delineated in President 'Wood' s memo of November 4 
1971. 

Chairman Gage pointed out that the Working Group had agree 
from the start that there are differences between the two campuses. 
It also agreed to focus first on the similarities. The Group felt 
that if they spent time on the affirmative action program for min- 
ority students this would, in the long run, help all students at the 
University. Dr. Gage added that we would be able to learn to listen 
and to respond and would be a step ahead; the Report would adjust 
itself to a broad range of human needs. Movement would be from a 
purely professional "working together" student relationship to one 
of "person-to-person listening and working together"--helping to 
solve problems. The Amherst members of the Committee are willing 
and eager to address themselves to the problems of the Boston campus 
The need now is for information which has been somewhat difficult 
to obtain, Dr. Gage continued. 

Trustee Sandwen observed that the CCEBS Program at Amherst 
is integrating into the general campus structure in the sense that 
persons responsible for and participating in the program have worked 
very hard. They consider the special problems of minority students 
to be of great importance and are eager for action. 

Professor Lynch said there was "a kind of heaviness" felt 
by the minority members of the President's Working Group. 

Chancellor Broderick responded that Professor Lynch 's com- 
ment points up the problem. What is the purpose of the President's 
Working Group? Is its charge to develop and recommend an affirmativje 
action program for minority groups, or is it charged to provide 
explicit objectives for development of comprehensive counseling and 
support services for both campuses? 



387 



^ 



Joint Ad Hoc 

Comm. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



ial 



3878 

Joint Ad Hoc 

Comm. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working Group on 
Univers^^M.TTEE 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Trustee Shaler said he felt that the President's original 
charge was flexible enough to encompass both objectives. 

President Wood felt that the first reports of the Working 
Group were in line with the intent of his original request. He 
cautioned against employing a different process for each campus in 
the method of presentation to the Trustees. 

Trustee Snowden was extremely concerned that some persons 
were not really committed to examination of the problem. She stated 
further that the original impetus for creating the President's Work- 
ing Group arose out of problems encountered by black students at 
UM/Boston. 

Trustee Sandwen reaffirmed his view that the Working Group 
Report can be used as an effective catalyst for change. 

Dr. Bromery mentioned that the only vehicle for disadvan- 
taged white students to become enrolled in the University at present 
is through the CCEBS Program. 

Trustee Chandler queried Dr. Gage as follows: "What does 
your Group consider to be a minority student?" (For purposes of 
clarification, a verbatim transcript of the remarks exchanged betweeiji 
Trustee Chandler and Dr. Gage on this point is attached to these 
minutes as Appendix I.) 

Dr. Gage responded that he was terribly frustrated for lack 
of words. He repeated that the Working Group is not concerned solely 
for minority students. He stated that there is a broad range of 
human needs; also, that people react very much in common ways in 
similar situations. There are a large number of young people, and 
our population has needs which have not been met. Dr. Gage added 
that he and the Working Group feel that there is a need to establish 
ways to listen to and respond to these needs. He said the Group did 
not intend to stop there; he expressed concern that people seemed 
unwilling to go a step further. 

Dr. Wood noted (1) that judgment between any two committees 
may quite properly reflect substantially different views. (2) The 
Trustees have always expressed willingness to face a difference of 
opinion. The President reminded those present that, at the last 
meeting of the Trustee Joint Ad Hoc Committee, there was a general 
concurrence on the philosophy of working to solve problems of minor- 
ity students, and that this would affect all students at the Univer- 
sity beneficially. 

Responding to an inquiry of the President, Dr. Gage stated 
that his Group needed a sense of direction before continuing their 
work. Co-chairman Rowland said she felt the Committee should meet 
to restudy its original purpose. 

Co-Chairman Troy said his view was that the purpose of the 
Working Group was the University-wide improvement of counseling, 
advising, and support services with special emphasis and attention 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



given to minority students. He suggested that this Committee instruc 
the Group to proceed with its work. 

Trustee Snowden pointed out that the University should be 
trying to find ways to insure the success of its students. She said 
we must look at how students succeed, and this would give us a point 
of departure. All students should have access to this opportunity. 

Dr. Bromery suggested that, too often in society, we relate 
economics with the potential ability of people. He felt that the 
state university offers the only vehicle of hope that can realize the 
potential of young people from lower-income groups, and reemphasized 
that--if we can find ways of improving services to minority students 
all other students will benefit as a result. 

Chancellor Broderick explained that his Student Personnel 
Services area is not insensitive to the needs of minority students. 
He added, however, that they are concerned with the overall improve- 
ment of counseling, advising, and support services. They are also 
aware that special attention should be paid to the problems of minor- 
ity students at UM/Boston. However, in his view, the Boston campus 
resources at the present time are simply not adequate. If all of his 
resources in this area are consumed by programs especially designed 
for minority students, he said, then this would have an adverse 
effect on the total student population of the Boston campus. 

Trustee Shaler pointed out, as an overall proposition, that 
the total needs of the minority students are much greater than those 
of other students. He added that minority students should not be 
shortchanged in this process. 

Co-chairman Troy observed that the greatest pool oif talent 
available to improve counseling and advising was the faculty. He sai|d 
that the stage-two Progress Report did not emphasize this point to 
the degree that he would have preferred. He suggested further that 
we relate effective faculty advising to the merit system. 

President Wood said it was important for the Trustees to 
receive the Report in a form which incorporates a whole program for 
both campuses. He reiterated his desire to have additional data 
from the Boston campus. At this point, Chancellor Broderick again 
expressed concern as to the direction in which the Working Group 
appeared to be going with respect to the problem of counseling on an 
overall basis. 

Trustee Snowden was very much concerned with the "heaviness 
that the black members of the Working Group felt, as expressed by 
Professor Lynch. She said we must have an indication for all involved 
that we are moving forward in this matter. She emphasized that the 
black students, faculty, and administrators are concerned about lack 
of progress. 



3879 



Joint Ad Hoc 

Comm. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



3880 

Joint Ad Hoc 

Coram. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working Group on 
Unive r sddi^M ittee 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Consultant Lyons noted that much of the controversy seems 
to lie in the area of semantics. He added that the Board of Trustee 
itself has, in general, made great progress by coming to grips with 
these issues. He felt that all members of the Board should become 
involved in discussions of this sort. President Wood reported that 
Mr. Lyons had agreed to serve as Consultant to the Working Group. 

Dr. Gage stated that the Working Group has addressed it- 
self to University-wide counseling as exemplified in the second- 
stage report. He plans to continue this approach. The President's 
Working Group will meet next week. 

Dr. Broderick said that he would have the Boston campus 
material ready within the next two weeks. 

Professor Lynch wanted to make sure that the Trustees 
understand the ray of hope that the establishment of the Working 
Group had created. From the beginning, a climate of trust had 
developed between blacks and whites, students, faculty, and admin- 
istrators. It would be sad, he said, to see this ray of hope 
diminished. 

In conclusion, President Wood summarized the general feel- 
ing of the Committee members that the Working Group should continue 
with its present tasks; also, Chancellor Broderick should supply 
Chairman Gage with information on the needs of the Boston campus; 
finally, that a third-stage report should be presented to this Joint 
Ad Hoc Committee of the Trustees within a reasonable period of time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:15 p.m. 





lobert J ^/McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trust 




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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

APPENDIX I 

Meeting of the Joint Ad Hoc Committee on Counseling, Advising, and 

Support Services 

Transcript of Dr. Gage's Response to Trustee Chandler on the Working 



Group's Definition of the Term "Minority Student. " 

Trustee Chandler: Can I ask you, Dr. Gage, what does your Committee 
consider to be a minority student? 

Dr. Gage: The largest bulk of minority students are blflck students 
but Spanish-speaking students, Indians, Asian American 
students--these are the most frequent. We have a large 
number of poor white students who are in. . . 

Chandler: Yes, but you mentioned them last. My point is that in 

regard to counseling the minority student might very well 
be the son of an executive making $50,000 a year. 

Gage: I am terribly frustrated for lack of words and an ability 
to express the conviction of this group--that we are not 
concerned solely for minority students. We are not focus- 
ing our attention only and purely upon them. We do feel 
that there is a broad range of human needs that people 
react to in very much common ways to similar situations-- 
and that there are large numbers of young people in our 
population who have needs which have not yet been met, 
which have not been understood, which have not even been 
listened to. Now the group that has the most serious gap 
between resources and their needs are the minority student 
because they have not only cultural limitation gaps in 
that, but they have vast economic and educational problems 
But there are many other students that have comparable 
problems some of them coming right out of our own homes 
that have tremendous gaps between their needs and the 
resources of the institution to meet their needs and help 
them become productive citizens. Now the common denomina- 
tor that we see to all of this is this gap in understanding 
the need and the ability of the institution to adjust 
itself and meet changing needs. Now, our conviction is, 
if we establish a mode of listening to people and listen 
and sensitizing ourselves to what their real needs are, 
not our conception of what they ought to be doing but 
listening to them and loosening up our resources so that 
we respond to their needs. Then we shall have set a model 
through which we can respond to anybody's needs, whether 
it be people from the top echelon or the bottom econom- 
ically. Now the way we will do this best, most effectivel; 
is by addressing ourselves to the minority students, dis- 
enfranchised people, poor people, whatever way you want to 
look at it. Because the gap between them and those of us 
in the institution is the greatest. Now we intend not to 



3831 



Joint Ad Hoc 

Comm. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
Working Group on 
University 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



388i 



Joint Ad Hoc 

Comm. 
2-16-72 

Progress Report, 
President' s 
WorkingcoMMiTTEE 
Group on Univer- 
sity Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-076) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Gage: stop here and I don't know how to express this with any 
more vehemence than I have before we are determined not 
to stop here, but where we're frustrated is by a feeling 
that people are not willing to go the next step and try 
to implement real programs to meet broad needs. 

Chandler: Well, I would just say that this is a wonderful statement 
and I agree with you one hundred percent and I would hope 
that the final report would contain a preamble that said 
just that. It would make it much clearer. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

February 17, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret , President Wood; Trustee Knowles; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Mr. 
Gartenberg 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

Office of the Treasurer : Associate Treasurer Brand 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion, 
Director of Personnel DeNyse; Mr. Simpson, Staff Assistant 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Budget Officer Olson 
for Vice Chancellor Hamilton; Prof. Weaver, representing 
University Senate 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Stockwell, representing 
Dean Soutter; Controller Cathey 

Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc.: Mr. Ladd 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:00 a.m. He 
requested comment from investment counsel on a document (Doc. T72- 
084 ) previously mailed to the Trustees. 



Mr. Ladd, representing Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., out- 
lined the alternative proposals recommended by the investment coun- 
sel. Treasurer Johnson reported that $10,000 of the amount to be 
invested represents an increment deriving from an anonymous Medical 
School scholarship. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W- Johnson, to buy the following bonds 
for the University's investment portfolio as 
recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., 
as follows: 

BUY : 5M So. Calif. Edison 

5M Southwestern Bell 

5M Commonwealth Edison 

5M American Tel 



3883; 



Report of 
Investment 
Counsel 
(Doc. T72-084) 



3884 

Finance Comm. 
2-17-72 

Exchange Offer of 
U.S. Treas. 
4-1/8 of '74 
(Doc. T72-067 ) 

COMMITTEE 



Quarterly Report 
of the Treas. for 
the Period July 1 
1971, to Dec. 31 
1971 
(Doc. T72-063 ) 

UM/Worcester-- 
Transfer of 
Funds 
(Doc. T72-075 ) 



Policy and Pro- 
cedure Paper on 
Transfer Accounts 
(Doc. T72-074) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Ladd reviewed the general national and world financial 
outlook for the next fiscal year. Basically, this indicates heavy 
demands for private and public credit and rising interest rates. 
There was some concern as to how this will affect tax-exempt bond 
issues. The Committee concurred with the investment counsel's rec- 
ommendation that the Endowment Fund not accept the Exchange Offer of 
U.S. Treasury's 4-1/8 of 1974 (Doc . T72-067 ) . 

The Quarterly Report of the Treasurer for the Period 
July 1, 1971, to December 31, 1971 (Doc. T72-063 ) was discussed. 
This document has been mailed to the Trustees and is on file in the 
Office of the Secretary. 



President Wood requested that the Committee consider next 
the Transfer of Funds for UM/Worcester (Doc. T72-075 ) so that Mr. 
Stockwell could leave to be present at the opening of subcontract 
bids for the Teaching Hospital. It was noted that these are the 
first transfers to accounts 12 and 13 requested this year at 
UM/Worcester. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 



VOTED : 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the following transfers between subsidiary 
accounts at the Medical School, UM/Worcester , as 
detailed in Doc. T72-075: 



Account 
01 
12 
13 



From 



$38,000 



To 



$ 14 , 000 
$24,000 



Vice President Phillips reported that the Policy and Pro- 
cedure Paper on Transfer Accounts (Doc. 172-074) has been reviewed 



and approved by the appropriate officials on all three campuses. He 
stressed that the policy contains no provision for transferring 
state funds to trust funds. Chairman Pumphret proposed the inclusion 
of the personal service accounts 01-03 to give the President across 
the-board authority within the stated limitation of $20,000. He 
also observed that any transfers made under this policy would be 
reported in full to the next following meeting of the Committee. 
Trustee Knowles suggested that it would be desirable to have addi- 
tional background information provided before taking a vote. The 
Chairman concurred. 

Chairman Pumphret commended the supporting data for the 
UM/Worcester transfer just acted upon and stated that he would be 



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388; 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

willing to accept a similar report with the notation, "Approved by 
the President on (date) and filed with the Finance Committee." 
Vice President Phillips will discuss details of the proposal with 
Mrs. Knowles , outlining the types of transfers that are anticipated. 
A revised proposal will be submitted to the Committee at its next 
meeting. 

Referring to the possibility of a Real Estate Purchase 
Contract on 11.182 Acres of Lincoln Trust Land in Ohio , Treasurer 
Johnson stated that the report to the Trustees in his memo of 
January 27, 1972 (Doc. T72-070 ) was for their information only. He 
pointed out that the contract represents a highly favorable situatioji 
if implemented on the terms contained in the document. 

Chairman Pumphret expressed his desire for additional 
Information on Renewal for 1972 of Personnel Protection Policy per 
Bids of December 10, 1971 (Doc. T72-071 ) . He stated that this polic; 
provides very wide coverage and should be supported with detai led 
reports of payments for the previous three years; also with the num- 
ber and types of vehicles on the three campuses, and notation of any 
cases pending. Treasurer Johnson will supply this information to 
the Committee and resubmit this matter for consideration at the next 
meeting. 

The Committee then turned its attention to the item on 
New Endowment Funds : Donald P Allan Endowment Scholarship Fund 
and Richard T. Hogan Memorial Scholarship (Doc . T72-072 ) . 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
establish the Donald P. Allan Scholarship Award, 
in the amount of $6,500.00 as an Endowment Fund 
for the purpose of making an annual award for 
the full amount of income earned during the pre- 
ceding fiscal year to a student enrolled at the 
University. Selection of the recipient shall be 
recommended by the subcommittee on athletic grants- 
in-aid of the University Committee on Financial 
Aid and Scholarships. The award shall be made 
upon the basis of scholastic achievement and active 
participation in the football program of the School 
of Physical Education at the Amherst Campus; the 
recipient shall not receive more than four annual 
awards and if he voluntarily removes himself from 
active participation in the football program, he 
must forfeit continuation of the award in the next 
succeeding academic year. In the event that an 
annual award is not made, the unused income shall 
be added to the principal of the fund on June 30. 



«J 



Finance Comm. 
2-17-72 

Policy and Pro- 
cedure Paper on 
Transfer 
Acounts 
(Doc. T72-074) 



Real Estate 
Purchase Con- 
tract on 
11. 182 Acres of 
Lincoln Trust 
Land in Ohio 
(Doc. T72-070 ) 

Information on 
Renewal for 1972 
of Personnel Pro- 
tection Policy 
per Bids of 
Dec. 10, 1971 
(Doc. T72-071) 



New Endowment 
Funds 
(Doc. T72-072) 



3886 

Finance Comm. 
2-17-72 

New Endowment 
Funds 
(Doc. T72-072 ) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Preliminary 
Report on 
Parking and 
Traffic Control 
(Doc. T72-069) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they establish the Richard T. Hogan Memorial 
Scholarship Fund as an endowment fund of the 
University of Massachusetts in the principal 
amount of four thousand four hundred dollars 
($4,400.00) from gifts and donations of the 
family and friends of the late Richard T. Hogan, 
student at UM/Boston, with the provision that 
the principal may be increased from time to 
time on receipt of additional gifts, said principal 
to be invested and reinvested by the Trustees of 
the University in accordance with their usual 
custom in the pooled endowment funds of the Univer- 
sity with the income earned thereon for a period 
of ten years to be added to the principal of the 
fund and thereafter commencing in 1982 the income 
is to be made available for the award of scholar- 
ships to students at the University of Massachusetts/ 
Boston as determined by the committee duly consti- 
tuted thereat to award scholarships with due con- 
sideration being given that the recipients shall 
continue the high standards exemplified by Richard 
T. Hogan while a student at UM/Boston. 

In addition, it is the expressed intention of the 
Hogan family for the next ten years to make an 
annual gift for a Richard T. Hogan Memorial Scholar- 
ship Award to a student at UM/Boston who, subject to 
the approval of the Chancellor, may be selected by 
the Hogan family. 

Vice Chancellor Campion noted that his Report on Parking 
and Traffic Control , UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-069 ) , is a preliminary 
progress report containing highlights from studies undertaken con- 
currently by the Master Planning Committee, the Campus Parking Com- 
mittee, and an Ad Hoc Faculty Senate Committee on Parking. All 
reports stressed three underlying basic principles: 

1. The plan must be a comprehensive one, covering all facets 
of the parking and traffic problem. 

2. An alternate means of transportation around the campus must 
be provided. 

3. The vehicle registration and parking fees should be based 
on convenience and service. 

Mr. Campion noted that no specific fee schedule has been suggested 
in any of the studies and that action on this is being delayed 
briefly until the Faculty Senate considers its own report. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Pumphret requested Mr. Campion to provide the Com- 
mittee with information on traffic and parking control plans and fees 
at other campuses; i.e., Simmons, Boston University, Amherst College, 
and others. He also stressed the importance of having the proposal 
ready for presentation to the full Board of Trustees in April. 

The Committee then considered the Proposed Changes in Fees 
for (a) University and Lincoln Apartments and (b) Conferee Use of 



Dormitories , UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-068 ) . Vice Chancellor Campion 
stated that the security deposit fee and the related trust fund are 
parallel to the action already taken for North Village. These fees 
and the elimination of lower rates for some apartments have received 
unanimous agreement from the Married Student Housing Committee. The 
increased conferee room rates in dormitories are commensurate with 
similar rates at other universities. The delegation of authority to 
the Chancellor to set miscellaneous service charges other than rents 
was also requested. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
March 1, 1972, a security deposit equivalent to one 
month's rent shall be required of each lessee in 
Lincoln and University Apartments, payable to the 
University according to the terms, conditions, and 
covenants stipulated in University of Massachusetts 
Married Student Housing Lease Agreement Document No. 
T72-020 , said security deposit to be subject to ap- 
proval by the appropriate Federal body charged with 
establishing guidelines pertinent to this matter. 

It was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that security 
deposits within the purview of Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 186, Section 15B as amended, required 
of residents of Lincoln and University Apartments 
shall be deposited in an interest-earning account 
which shall be called "Lincoln-University Security 
Deposit/Amherst Trust Fund," to be invested in such 
a manner that the management of said Lincoln and 
University Apartments comply with Chapter 186, Section 
15B, of Massachusetts General Laws , which stipulate 
in part, "a landlord of residential real property 
who holds a security deposit pursuant to this section 
for a period in excess of one year from the commence- 
ment of the term of tenancy shall, beginning with the 
first day after the expiration of such year, pay 
interest at the rate of five percent per year, pay- 
able to the tenant at the end of each year." Said 
earned interest to be deposited in an account separate 
from the principal for the purpose of interest 
income payments to the tenants as required by law. 



388? 

Finance Comm. 
2-17-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Preliminary 
Report on 
Parking and 
Traffic Control 
(Doc. T72-069 ) 

UM/Amherst-- 
Proposed 
Changes in Fees 
for: (a) Univer- 
sity and Lincoln 
Apts. & (b) Con- 
feree Use of 
Dormitories 
(Doc. T72-068) 



UM/Amherst-- 
Proposed Changes 
in Fees for: 
(a) University 
and Lincoln Apts. 
and (b) Conferee 
Use of 
Dormitories 
(Doc. T72-068) 



3888 

Finance Comm. 
2-17-72 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Changes 
in Fees for: 

(a) University 
and Lincoln Apts, 

and COMMITTEE 

(b) Conferee Use 
of Dormitories 
(Doc. T72-068) 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was also 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 
effective March 1, 1972, the rental rates for 
students who since November 1, 1970, have 
occupied Lincoln and University Apartments 
shall be increased to equal the rates estab- 
lished for students who took occupancy on or 
after November 2, 1970, in Lincoln and Univer- 
sity Apartments. 



University Apartments 



From 



To 



Studio 




$69.00 


$72.00 


One Bedroom Effici 


ency 


85.00 


90.00 


One Bedroom 




90.00 


95.00 


Two Bedroom Effici 


ency 


95.00 


100.00 


Two Bedroom 




100.00 


105.00 


Three Bedroom 




115.00 


120.00 


Lincoln Apartments 








Studio 




$69.00 


$72.00 


One Bedroom 




85.00 


90.00 


Two Bedroom 




100.00 


105.00 



The above charges include the cost of utilities 
(e.g., heat, electricity, water, and sewer taxes). 

The above rent change shall be subject to approval 
by the appropriate Federal body charged with estab- 
lishing rental rate guidelines. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
March 1, 1972, the conference rates in the Residence 
Hall Fund dormitories shall be: 



Accommodation 

Single room, all services 

Double room, all services 

Single room, all services 

Double room, all services 



Rates * 

$9.00/night 
5.00/night/bed 
2.50/night 
2.50/night/bed 



*Occupants staying in excess of seven days shall be 
given a 10% discount. 

The above rent change shall be subject to approval 
by the appropriate Federal body charged with estab- 
lishing rental rate guidelines. 

It was then 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if 
adopted by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, the following charges for con- 
ference accommodations in all dormitories of the 
Authority shall be: 



Accommodation 

Single room, all services 

Double room, all services 

Single room, all services 

Double room, all services 



Rates * 

$9.00/night 
5.00/night/bed 
2.50/night 
2.50/night/bed 



*Occupants staying in excess of seven days shall 
be given a 10% discount. 

The above rent change shall be subject to approval 
by the appropriate Federal body charged with estab- 
lishing rental rate guidelines. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Chancellor of the University at Amherst be authorized 
to establish miscellaneous service charges other 
than rents, necessary to providing conferee service 
in all dormitories of the Residence Halls Trust 
Fund, subject to approval by the appropriate Federal 
body charged with establishing guidelines pertinent 
to this matter. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

recommend to the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority that the Chancellor of the Univer- 
sity at Amherst be authorized to establish miscel- 
laneous service charges, other than rents, necessary 
to providing conferee service in all dormitories 
of the Authority, subject to approval by the appro- 
priate Federal body charged with establishing guide- 
lines pertinent to this matter. 

After brief further discussion, the meeting was adjourned 
at 11:35 a.m. 




lobert 
Secreta 




McCartney 
Board of Trustees 



3889 

Finance Comm. 
2-17-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Proposed Changes 
in Fees for: 
(a) University 
and Lincoln 
Apts. & (b) 
Conferee Use of 
Dormitories 
(Doc. T72-068) 



3890 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Approval of Work- 
ing Drawings 
(Doc. T72-065 ) 

UM/Amherst-- 
Graduate Research 
Building, 
Phase II 
(Doc. T72-065 ) 



UM/Amherst- - 

Dairy Animal 

Research 

Laboratory 
(South Deerfield) 
(Doc. T72-065) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 17, 1972; 12:30 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis , President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Crowlej 
Knowles, Lambson, Maginnis, Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests: 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery, Planning Officer 
Littlefield; Mr. Ryan, Chief Project Engineer 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Planning Officer O'Brien; 
Prof. Weaver, representing the University Senate 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 12:30 p.m. and 
invited Mr. Littlefield, Planning Officer, UM/Amherst, to present 
the first agenda item, Approval of Working Drawings (Doc. 172-065). 

Mr. Littlefield displayed photographs of the scale model 
of the Graduate Research Building , noting that the western and 
northern towers comprise Phase II of the Center. The total antic- 
ipated cost is $12,500,000 against an appropriation of $11,200,000, 
leaving a balance of $1,300,000 to come from the BBC contingency 
fund. The area (161,000 gross square feet) provides for 56 class- 
rooms, 300 offices, and research laboratories for the Department of 
Physics. As soon as the drawings are approved by the Trustees, bids 
will be requested. Completion is anticipated in the fall of 1974. 
Mr. Littlefield also mentioned that there is space for a north wing 
on the site but no decision on actual construction of it will be 
made until the growth potential within the new campus ceiling is 
known. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the working drawings for Phase II of the 
Graduate Research Center, UM/Amherst. 

Turning to the Dairy Animal Research Laboratory (South 
Deerfield), UM/Amherst, Planning Officer Littlefield presented a 



map and architect's drawings and distributed a simplified sketch of 
the proposed building. He noted that the relocation of the Univer- 
sity's animal facilities was first studied in 1963. The move will 
enable replacement of obsolete barns in the western center of the 
existing campus which present a safety hazard in a now-congested 
area. It is planned to provide facilities in South Deerfield later 
for beef animals and horses. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The laboratory will be located in a wood-frame building 
and will reflect the evolution in agricultural procedures and herd 
management. Its facilities will provide Stockbridge students in 
Veterinary and Animal Sciences with actual working experience with 
an outstanding Holstein herd. All present concurred with Trustees 
Crowley and Lambson that there is a natural trend toward appreciation 
of the land and renewed interest in ecology. Chairman Haigis enumer 
ated other possible innovations at South Deerfield; i.e., young 
animals as an educational attraction and recreation and boating 
areas . 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
accept the working drawings of the Dairy Animal 
Research Laboratory (South Deerfield), UM/Amherst. 

Reviewing the Construction Progress Report , UM/Amherst 
(Doc. T72-080 ) , Mr. Littlefield noted that changes are reported in 
only five projects: corrective action is in process on the con- 
trolled atmosphere room seals in the Horticultural Research Building 
The BBC will award the contract for the New Boiler Plant shortly. 
Hanley Structures has submitted detailed drawings for the Modular 
Building near the Infirmary (Site AD) . Bids for the Infirmary 
Addition will be advertised in early March; also, the Laundry Facil- 
ity at North Village Apartments should be completed in early summer. 
Mr. Littlefield reported that Phase I of the circumferential road 
may start this summer. The Town of Amherst has agreed to close 
North Pleasant Street as soon as Phase I is completed and will give 
title as soon as there is significant progress on Phases II and III. 

Mr. O'Brien, Planning Officer, UM/Boston, then presented 
his Construction Progress Report . The fire-damaged area at College 
II has recovered its December status with all Phase I construction 
progressing well. 

He distributed copies of a directive issued by BBC to all 
contractors at Columbia Point delineating a "Procedure for Site 
Entry after Hours" (Doc. T72-081 ) . Some difficulty in compliance 
has been experienced with construction workers on the site. Occa- 
sional coverage by State Police is being considered. 

Copies of a BBC memorandum regarding rodent control (Doc. 
T72-082 ) were distributed to the Committee along with a copy of 
the plan and specifications submitted by the Safety Fumigant Company 
successful bidder. This will be referred to the Wildlife Services 
Office of the U.S. Department of Interior for review and concurrence 
Trustee Knowles commended the report and stressed the importance of 
the effect of this coverage on the entire Columbia Point community. 

Reporting on Phase IIA (Physical Education Building and 
second phase of Science Building) of the building program, Mr. 
O'Brien stated that the architects should be selected in the near 
future. This will be followed by a separate review of both facil- 
ities by this Committee. 



38? 



B & G Comm. 
2-17-72 

UM/Amherst- - 

Dairy Animal 

Research 

Laboratory 
(South Deerfield) 
(Doc. T72-065) 



UM/Amherst-- 
Construction 
Progress Report 
(Doc. T72-080) 



UM/ Boston- 
Construction 
Progress Report 
Columbia Point 

Procedure for 

Site Entry after 

Hours 

(Doc. T72-081) 



Rodent Control 
(Doc. T72-082) 



Phase II of 
Building Program 



3892 



B & G Comm. 
2-17-72 

UM/Worcester-- 
Construction 
Progress Report 

COMMITTEE 

Health 
Facilities 
Planning 
(Doc. T72-083) 



Naming of 
Buildings- 
Policy 



UM/Amherst-- 
Comments 

re 

Tobin Hall and 
Library 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood reported that Mr. Stockwell, UM/Worcester , 
is now at the BBC bid opening for the Teaching Hospital. He dis- 
tributed copies of a letter sent today to Peter C. Goldmark, Jr. , 
Secretary for Human Services (Doc. T72-083 ) , regarding the health 
facilities planning in the Worcester area. This review and response 
by Dean Soutter and Vice President Edelman to misstatements made in 
the press will assist the Trustees if they are questioned about the 
situation. Regarding construction progress, the President reported 
that both the Power Plant and the Medical Science Buildings are on 
schedule. 

Chairman Haigis mentioned the probability of requests 
coming to the Committee that buildings at UM/Amherst be named for 
living persons. The consensus was that this exception to normal 
policy should occur only in very exceptional circumstances. 

Acting Chancellor Bromery noted that Tobin Hall at UM/ 
Amherst is nearing completion; also, that the cornerstone for the 
new University Library has arrived and will be laid in a ceremony 
separate from the building dedication. Mr. Littlefield added that 
the library should be ready for occupancy in June, with the various 
collections to be moved in during the summer. 

After brief further discussion, the meeting was adjourned 
at 1:20 p.m. 




Robert J . McCartney 
Secretary,' Board of Trust* 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

March 28, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; West Center Section, 
Hampden Dining Commons , UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis , President Wood; Trustees Crowley, Howes, 
Knowles, Lambson, Maginnis, Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Croce, Sandwen, Weldon 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn, Miss 
Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Acting Chancellor Bromery; Mr. Norton, 
Director of Physical Plant 

The Chairman was unavoidably delayed in arrival. Trustee 
Crowley, as acting Chairman, called the meeting to order at 10:00 a.ifi. 

Regarding a proposed Western Massachusetts Electric Com- 
pany Contract, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-094 ) , Vice Chancellor Campion 
reviewed the negotiations leading to the proposed contract and new 
rate schedules to be effective retroactively as of November 14, 1971 
Two options were offered by Western Mass.: (1) a straight 6.5% 
increase in the existing contract or (2) a new standard industrial- 
type contract which would result in considerable monetary saving. 
Several changes advantageous to the University have already been 
agreed to by WMECO and some further revisions are being proposed by 
Treasurer Johnson following discussion with Mr. Campion. The Com- 
mittee agreed that every effort should be made to negotiate a con- 
tract to provide the necessary electrical service as economically as 
possible. Adequate protection for certain rights for the University 
should also be assured. 



After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded. 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice 
Chancellor Thomas B. Campion, UM/Amherst, be 
authorized to negotiate further with the Western 
Massachusetts Electric Company on a proposed 
contract for electric power at UM/Amherst in line 
with certain questions raised in this matter by 
the Committee on Buildings and Grounds. 

Vice Chancellor Campion then presented the Request by 
WAMH-- Student Radio Station of Amherst College—to Locate Transmitte 



Facilities on Mount Lincoln on land owned by UM/Amherst. He has 



3893 



UM/Amherst-- 

Proposed Contract 

with Western 

Mass. Electric 

Company 

(Doc. T72-094) 



UM/ Amherst- - 
Request of Amherst 
College Student 
Radio Station 
WAMH to Locate 
Transmitter on Mt. 
Lincoln 



3894 

UM/ Amherst- - 
Request of 
Amherst College 
Student Radio 
Station to Locate 
Transmitter on 
Mt. Lincoln 

COMMITTEE 

Comm. on B & G 
3-28-72 



Federal Surplus 
Property 
(Doc. T72-099 ) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

visited the location with Lawrence Wissow, Station Manager, and has 
discussed the proposed contract with George Norton, Director of 
Physical Plant, UM/ Amherst, and with Sidney Myers, Counsel, UM/ 
Amherst. Secretary McCartney stated that he and Assistant Secretary 
Rawn have met with Amherst College Secretary Hewlett. Together, an 
arrangement was worked out whereby a professional engineering survey 
will be contracted by Amherst College in advance of any construction 
at Mt. Lincoln to provide full guarantees that the proposed instal- 
lation will not create interference with the incoming signal from 
Radio Station WGBH-FM. (This signal is rebroadcast by WFCR-FM 
licensed to the Board of Trustees.) Mr. Campion added that, once 
the tower is installed, it will be tested for interference. It was 
pointed out further by Secretary McCartney that the proposed 
"license" memorandum of agreement with the Amherst College radio 
station would be reviewed by University counsel prior to implemen- 
tation. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, conditional 
upon completion of a fully professional engineering 
survey providing full guarantee and assurance that 
location of transmitting facilities for Amherst College 
Student Radio Station WAMH on Mount Lincoln will not 
cause interference to the incoming signal from Radio 
Station WGBH-FM, said signal presently being rebroad- 
cast by Radio Station WFCR-FM licensed to this Board, 
permission is granted to Radio Station WAMH-FM to locate 
its transmitting facilities on University property at 
Mount Lincoln in accordance with the recommendations of 
the aforementioned professional engineering survey and, 
subject to confirmation by University legal counsel, 
with the terms and conditions as set forth in the 
attached License (Doc. T72-066 ) . 

Chairman Haigis, having assumed the chair, Mr. Johnson was 
requested to present the next agenda item, Federal Surplus Property 
(Doc. T72-099 ) . The Treasurer stated that a recent offer from H.E.W 
concerning availability of former Westover Communications Annex No. 
3, a facility located near the Notch south of UM/ Amherst as surplus 
property, carries an April 13, 1972, closing date, thus requiring 
action today if the University has any interest in seeking to acquire 
it. 

Acting Chancellor Bromery who had inspected the installa- 
tion recently cautioned that it is highly specialized, completely 
underground, and requires air-conditioning equipment costing about 
$200,000 annually to operate. General Maginnis agreed, noting his 
personal experience with similar installations at the national level. 
Various possible campus uses were suggested including record storage, 
archives, and computer center, as well as possible collaboration with 
other colleges and/or libraries in Western Massachusetts or the New 
England area to create a repository. 

Trustee Howes mentioned that some interest has been 
expressed by the Federal Archives in securing such space in the New 



I 



COMMITTEE 



] 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

England area. The Committee agreed that a statement of interest 
should be filed and a feasibility study done to determine the 
potential uses, maintenance and personnel costs, and the degree of 
interest by other groups who might collaborate with UM/Amherst in 
this matter. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

Donald W. Madsen, Administrative Assistant, Office 
of the Treasurer, be authorized to file with 
H.E.W. a notice of interest in the former Westover 
Communications Annex No. 3 and that they request 
that a feasibility study be undertaken by the 
UM/Amherst administration for consideration of 
acquisition of this site by the University of 
Massachusetts. 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 a.m. 




Rohert J. /McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustee's 



389 



D 



Comm. on B &. G 
3-28-72 

Federal Surplus 
Property 
(Doc. T72-099 ) 



3898 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Name Change: 
Program in Compu- 
ter Science to 
Program in Compu- 
ter and Informa- 
tion Science 
(Doc. T72-105 ) . 



UM/Amherst-- 
Credit Evaluation 
Policy for 
Transfer Students 
(Doc. T72-106) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY 
AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

April 11, 1972: 12:45 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Maginnis, Sandwen; 
Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, Associate Provost 
Woodbury, Prof. Burroughs, rep. Faculty Senate; Prof. 
Larson, Natural Resources; Mr. Beals, Transfer Affairs; 
Prof. Short, Chemical Engineering; Prof. Arbib, Computer 
Science; Prof. Louttit, Psychology 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Marshall; Prof. 
Weaver, rep. University Senate 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 12:35 p.m. 

The Committee first considered the Name Change: Program 
in Computer Science to Program in Computer and Information Science , 
UM/ Amherst (Doc. T72-105 ) . Vice Chancellor Gluckstern commented 
that the Board had approved the related Ph.D. Program at its 
meeting on January 28, 1972, and that thisis merely a formality to 
conform to that change. Dr. Arbib, Chairman, Computer Science, 
stated his endorsement of the request and his willingness to supply 
any necessary justification or related information. Mr. Troy 
commended Dr. Arbib' s previous proposal for the Ph.D. Program. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the name change for the Program in Computer 
Science to the Program in Computer and Information 
Science, UM/Amherst. 

For the Committee's information, Mr. Beals, Director, 
Office of Transfer Affairs, then reviewed the Credit Evaluation 
Policy for Transfer Students, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-106 ) , recently 
adopted by the Board of Admissions and Records with the endorsement 
of the Faculty Senate. Students admitted with an A. A. degree from 
an accredited college will be (1) awarded the full number of credits 
taken to attain that degree, (2) will be granted junior-year 
standing, (3) will be given credit for University-wide core 
requirements, but, at the same time, (4) must meet all college, 
department, and major requirements for graduation, and (5) must 
initially meet all the University's admissions standards. The 
credits are given for the degree (whether or not the courses are 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

offered at the University) rather than for the courses on an 
individual basis. Trustee Sandwen raised the question of broadening 
this to a University-wide policy; however, Chancellor Broderick 
stated this would depend on the desires of the UM/Boston faculty. 

The Faculty Senate Constitution Amendments, UM/ 
Amherst , as reported by Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, are basically 
to shift the Amherst campus over to the multicampus segment level 
by substituting the word Chancellor for the word President and 
substituting the Vice Chancellors for Student Affairs and 
Administrative Services as ex officio members in lieu of the 
Treasurer and the Dean of the Medical School. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the amendments to the UM/Amherst Faculty 
Senate Constitution as contained in Document T72-107 . 

The Committee then turned to the Bachelor's Degree with 
Individual Concentration, Report and Recommendation for Permanent 
Status, UM/Amherst . (Doc. T72-103 ) . Prof. Short, Chairman of the 
Academic Matters Committee, Faculty Senate, reported that the BDIC 
program, which is currently completing its two-year trial period, 
now involves 134 students supervised by 114 faculty sponsors. 
This has been a successful program and meets a need of the student 
body, although, Dr. Short stated, the real strength will always lie 
on the ability and integrity of the sponsors. He noted that ideally 
each sponsor is assigned only one student with whom he meets at leas 
once every two weeks. Students are required to write bisemester 
reports which the sponsors must review and sign. Associate Provost 
Woodbury remarked that there is increasing interest from clusters 
of faculty from various desciplines to sponsor specialized inter- 
disciplinary majors under BDIC. Mr. Kaplan noted the immediate 
application of the cluster concept of this program in connection 
with the agreement with the Department of Mental Health recently 
signed by President Wood. Dr. Gluckstern termed it "one of the 
more successful experiments tried on the Amherst campus." 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve permanent status for the Bachelor's Degree 
with Individual Concentration at UM/Amherst. 

Professor Larson, speaking on behalf of the Proposal for 
an Undergraduate Major in Natural Resource Studies in the Depart - 
ment of Forestry and Wildlife Management, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-104 ) , 
stated that it will provide B.A. graduates with career opportunities 
in various combinations of courses with the natural resources major; 
i.e., journalism, botany, etc. The proposal was patterned after 
successful programs at rather outstanding universities, will take 
better advantage of courses already existing on campus, and will 
require no new faculty or facilities. 



3897 

F & EP Comm. 
4-11-72 

UM/Amherst- - 
Credit Evaluation 
Policy for 
Transfer Students 
(Doc. T72-106 ) 

UM/ Amherst- - 
Faculty Senate 
Constitution 
Amendments 
(Doc. T72-107 ) 



UM/Amherst-- 
Bachelor's Degree 
with Individual 
Concentration, 
Report and Recom- 
mendation for 
Permanent Status 
(Doc. T72-103 ) 



UM/ Amherst -- 
Proposal for an 
Undergraduate 
Major in Natural 
Resource Studies 
in the Dept. of 
Forestry and 
Wildlife Manage- 
ment 



3 8 98, 

F & EP Corrraio 
4-11-72 
UM/Amherst-- 
Proposal for an 
Undergraduate 
Major in Natural 
Resource Studies 
in the Dga^flfe 
Forestry and 
Wildlife Manage- 
ment 
(Doc. T72-104 ) 

UM/ Boston- 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 
(Doc. T72-092 ) 



UM/Boston-- 
Dr. John H. 
Strange, Dean, 
College of Public 
and Community 
Service 



UM/ Worcester -- 
Appointment of 
Dr. Merrill K. 
Wolf 



UM/ Amherst- - 
Sabbatical Policy 
Exemption for 
Jay A. Trowill 
(Doc. T72-108) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they approve Natural Resource Studies as 
an undergraduate major in the Department 
of Forestry and Wildlife Management, UM/ 
Amherst. 

Turning to UM/Boston, the Committee received 
Chancellor Broderick's endorsement of the Departmental Personnel 
Committees' strong recommendations to make offers with tenure to 
Professors Alfred R. Ferguson, English; Ethan Bolker, Mathematics; 
and Robert J. Steamer, Politics (Doc. T72-092 ) . On motion made 
and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

confirm and approve the Personnel Actions involving 
tenure detailed in Document T72-092 for UM/Boston. 

Dr. Broderick also announced to the Committee the 
appointment by President Wood of Dr. John H. Strange as Dean of 
the College of Public and Community Service (formerly College III). 
He described Dr. Strange, the near-unanimous choice of the Search 
Committee, as an academically well-prepared but very tough-minded 
administrator and an excellent choice for the position. Chairman 
Troy noted that the Committee is looking forward to the presentation 
of a curriculum for the College by the new Dean. 

Dean Soutter, UM/Worcester, then presented the name of 
Merrill K. Wolf for appointment to a full professorship in 
Neuroanatomy with tenure at the Medical School. On motion made and 
seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

confirm and approve the Personnel Action involving 
tenure for Dr. Merrill K. Wolf at the UM/Worcester 
Medical School. 

A lengthy and serious discussion followed Dr. Louttit's 
expression of concern for the future of the sabbatical concept of 
the University in any precedent set by the Committee and later by 
possible full Board action on the specific case of Professor Jay A. 
Trowill, Psychology, UM/ Amherst. Professor Trowill, who is now 
completing his sabbatical year at Yale University and has accepted an 
offer of immediate appointment at the University of Denver, has 
requested a waiver of the requirement that he "must return to duty 
for at least one full year of service immediately following the 
expiration of the leave" or "returnthe salary received during leave, 
unless an exception is made by the Board of Trustees." He has 
stated that he will not return to the University and the Department 
is already seeking a replacement. This precipitated the immediate 
issue to a question of whether to require repayment of all, part, 
or none of his sabbatical salary. The principle of precedent was 
also raised. There was general discussion of various trends in 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the handling of such cases at other universities and the legal 
aspects which might become involved. 

General Maginnis was vigorous in his opinion that 
restitution of the Commonwealth's money should be made as an 
obligation of the Trustees to the taxpayers of Massachusetts. 

Dean Soutter termed the sabbatical "a reward for past 
service." The Committee felt, however, that the intention remains 
that the granting institution should receive the first benefits of 
any professional improvement. While the administration and others 
present admitted to being somewhat ambivalent, it was agreed to 
maintain a stringent interpretation of the present policy. Dean 
Marshall, UM/Boston, urged reconsideration of the whole sabbatical 
concept to bring it into line with the leniency being evidenced in 
many other institutions. The Committee instructed President Wood 
to have the legal counsel draft a memorandum to Prof. Trowill 
maintaining the Board's position for review by the Trustees before 
the next meeting. 

Initiating Discussion of the Proposed University Affirmative 



Action Program (Doc. T72-119 ) , President Wood reviewed the progress 
made by the University in complying with the regulations prescribed 
in the 1964 Civil Rights Act and subsequent Executive Orders as 
implemented by HEW. The Amherst campus has undertaken an intensive 
investigation of discrimination. The Boston campus, though on a 
more selective basis, is also proceeding. In addition, the 
President has requested comments from this Committee as well as the 
various campuses and the President's Council on a proposed 
University Affirmative Action Program. The Massachusetts Commissior 
Against Discrimination has requested receipt of the plan early 
in July. 

Goals, Dr. Wood continued, must be set to comply with 
the quotas specified regarding employment of women, blacks, and 
other minority groups in line with present Trustee policy, as well 
as in admissions, financial aid, and counseling, advising, and 
support services. Dr. Kaplan noted that, although there will be one 
University of Massachusetts Affirmative Action Plan, the approach 
on each campus will be different. The Executive Order requires 
separate supervisory units for each campus as well as in the 
President's Office. 

Chancellor Broderick and Vice Chancellor Gluckstern stated 
that they are ready to proceed with campus implementation as soon 
as the goals are determined. Although some difficulty was foreseen 
in establishing the ratios during the "leveling-of f " period of 
recruitment, Vice President Edelman pointed out that a gradual 
adjustment will absorb some of the qualified minority-group 
candidates already becoming available through programs such as 
CCEBS and special admissions. 



389' 



F & EP COMM. 
4-11-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Sabbatical Policy 
Exemption for 
Jay A. Trowill 
(Doc. T72-108 ) 



Discussion of 

Proposed Univ. 

Affirmative Action 

Program 

(Doc. T72-119 ) 



3900 



F & EP Comm. 
4-11-72 

Discussion of 
Proposed Univ. 
Affirmative 

COMMITTEE 

Action Program 
(Doc. T72-119 ) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

As soon as the President's Office has reviewed the first 
drafts of the plans requested from the campuses by April 30, they 
will be referred to this Committee for information and comment. 
It is anticipated that the final plan will be completed by June 30, 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:35 p.m. 



c 




Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of TrustVes 




L 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

April 13, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office, 
85 Devonshire Street, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 

Wood; Trustees Carman, Chandler, Sandwen, Shaler, Snowden, 
Troy; Secretary McCartney, Ms. Pugh, recorder. 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, 
Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice Chancellor 
for Student Affairs Gage; Mr. Darland and Dr. Preston, 
representing WMPIRG; also Messrs. Voci, Rider, Yelsey, 
and Apostola. 

UM/ Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Mr. Sullivan, Director 
of Student Affairs; Professor Weaver, representing the 
University Senate 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Saunders 

Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. It 
was observed by the Committee that the Western Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group (WMPIRG) Proposal (Doc. T72-116 ) , the first 
item on the agenda, was received only one day prior to the meeting. 

Mr. Ed Voci, representing WMPIRG, introduced the proposal 
with a brief history of the student Public Interest Research Group 
concept. Consumer Advocate Ralph Nader originated the idea 
approximately a year and a half ago suggesting the creation of a 
student-financed, student-controlled staff of full-time profession- 
als which would work to solve certain problems existing in society 
today. The financing for the staff would be by a special refundable 
student fee ($2.00 per semester). An elected Student Board of 
Directors would control the work of the staff. According to Mr. 
Voci, WMPIRG serves two purposes: (1) it is an educational vehicle 
in which students learn by participation; and (2) it provides 
community service. Nineteen western Massachusetts schools will 
participate in a coordinated effort through WMPIRG. 

General discussion followed on the WMPIRG proposal. 
Chancellor Bromery believes the concept is good though there is some 
question of the legality and logistics of a refundable student fee. 
He informed the Committee that the University legal counsel is 
investigating the problem. 

In response to a question regarding the degree of student 
interest on the Amherst campus, Mr. Voci reported that a petition 
circulated recently resulted in 55% of the students who responded 
saying they believe the concept is good and that they would support 
the $2.00 tax. 



3901 



UM/ Amherst- - 
Proposal: 
Western Massachu- 
setts Public 
Interest Research 
Group 
(Doc. T72-116 ) 



390! 



Student Act. Coram, 
4-13-72 

UM/ Amherst -- 
Proposal: 
Western Massachu- 
setts Public 
Interest Research 

COMMITTEE 

Group 

(Doc. T72-116) 



UM/Amherst-- 
Picketing Code 
(Doc. T72-109) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

There was further discussion of the general idea, the 
budget figures for WMPIRG, other Universities involved, and the 
staffing of the group. 

President Wood stated that he supported the concept in 
principle. He will await the findings of legal counsel. There was 
a general consensus among the Committee that WMPIRG is a good idea 
and that it can become a real educational experience for students. 



It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 

approval of the Western Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group at the Amherst campus, 
and the levying of a refundable $2.00 student 
fee per semester, subject to the recommendation 
of the University's legal counsel. 

Chairman Rowland next introduced the Picketing Code for 
the Amherst Campus . Acting Vice Chancellor Gage was invited to 
make the presentation. 

Dr. Gage reported to the Committee that the Code now in 
effect on the Amherst campus is the one approved by the Board of 
Trustees in December, 1967. (Document T72-109a indicates the 
differences between that Code and the proposed one sent to the 
Committee in Document T72-109 ) . This policy statement in Doc. 
T72-109 was developed during 1970-71 by a joint student- faculty 
committee. It was adopted by the Faculty Senate on February 18, 
1971. The Student Senate, on March 14, 1971, passed the identical 
statement except that the phrase "other than classroom corridors 
and faculty office corridors" of section A 1 (a) was deleted. 

Dr. Gage pointed out that there seemed to be no way to 
resolve this difference. Therefore, the administration has 
recommended the adoption of the Faculty Senate version by the 
Trustees . 

In the discussion that followed, several points were 
raised. Chairman Rowland expressed concern that the Trustees should 
not have to reconcile differences between the Faculty and Student 
Senates. It was also observed by the Committee that the wording 
in the phrase was redundant and not really necessary. Dr. Gage 
reported that the inclusion of the above-mentioned phrase was 
passed only by a narrow margin in the Faculty Senate. 

There was a general consensus among the Committee that the 
policy statement was sufficient without the inclusion of the phrase. 
Due to the absence of the faculty representative, Dr. Wood suggested 
that the Committee approve the proposed picketing code with the 
deletion of the phrase, pending the opinion of the Faculty Senate 
on the matter. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Gage observed that this action by the Trustees was 
positive and helpful for the campus administrators in forwarding 
the information on to the Senate. 

Responding to Chancellor Bromery's concern about this 
policy statement being brought before the April meeting of the full 
Board, Dr. Wood said that the issue of the "included phrase" would 
be discussed during the earlier session of the Board of Trustees. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the policy statement on the Picketing Code 
at the Amherst campus as outlined in Document 
T72-109 deleting the phrase "other than classroom 
corridors and faculty office corridors" section 
A 1 (a), pending the opinion of the Faculty Senate, 
UM/Amherst, on this issue. 

Before moving on to the final item on the agenda, and in 
view of Trustee comment earlier in the meeting, Secretary McCartney 
expressed apologies from his office to the Committee members 
regarding the late transmittal of support material. President Wood 
commented that this is not the fault of the Secretary's Office, but 
is a very difficult problem we all have to face due to the tremen- 
dous time pressures in everyone's schedule. The President noted 
that he must decide if an item should be placed on the agenda with 
short notice or postponed for another month. The postponing of some 
items could be detrimental. Dr. Wood also expressed appreciation 
that the Trustees have always been willing and anxious to serve the 
University and become involved in these issues, even on short notice 

Trustee Snowden pointed out that she did not mind receivin; 
material late for Committee meetings, but that it was extremely 
important to receive them earlier before final action of the full 
Board meetings. 

The Committee then considered the Proposed Trustee State - 
ment on Counseling, Advising, and Support Services (Doc . T72-126 ) . 
Chairman Rowland noted that this statement had only been completed 
at the Gage committee meeting held yesterday, but she had asked for 
it to be presented to the Student Activities Committee today. 

Acting Vice Chancellor Gage noted that his committee 
has met three times since the last meeting with the Trustees. His 
group has proceeded with the assumption that the two earlier reports 
presented to the Trustees were basically valid and acceptable. A 
Progress Report on the Amherst campus, Document T72-125 , was 
distributed to the Committee by Dr. Gage who also gave a brief 
verbal progress report for the Boston campus. These reports 
discussed increased admission of minority students, affirmative 
action, counseling, advising, and support services on the campuses. 



3903 



Student Act. Coram. 
4-13-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Picketing Code 
(Doc. T72-109) 



Proposed Trustee 
Statement on 
Counseling, 
Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-126) 



3904 



Student Act. Coram 
4-13-72 

Proposed Trustee 
Statement on 
Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-126) 

IUMM I I IB. E 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Rowland commented that what the Trustees should 
be doing is determining policy which is then given to the 
President and the campus administrators to be carried out. She 
feels that, as Trustees, they should not be involved in the 
specifics of following through on implementation of policy. The 
Trustees should, however, be kept informed of the progress on each 
of the campuses. 

President Wood stated that he regards the Gage working 
group as an important vehicle for providing information to the 
Committee because it involves concerned members, and benefits from 
the experience of those most involved. The President agrees with 
Trustee Rowland that a policy statement of the Board imposes an 
obligation on the administrators to carry it out. More substantial 
information would be welcomed in carrying out the policy. Dr. Wood 
noted that a third document would be forthcoming as an administra- 
tive proposal to see that the policy is carried out. 

Regarding the subject of priorities, the President 
commented that there would be difficulties. He could not 
guarantee that everyone would be satisfied, but said that he would 
do his best. He hopes that the University will benefit from the 
recommendations and policies which result from this pan-campus 
experience. 

Chairman Rowland thanked Trustee Snowden for participating 
in the work of the President's Working Group on University 
Counseling, Advising, and Support Services. Mrs. Snowden feels 
that their service has been essential. 

General discussion followed on the proposed Trustee 
statement on Counseling, Advising, and Support Services (Doc. 
T72-126 ) . Dr. Gage mentioned that the intention of this statement 
is to provide a framework. 

Chancellor Bromery feels that there will be greater 
difficulties if the study committee continues without knowing 
whether or not the basis of its recommendations has been accepted 
and approved from an historical perspective. Dr. Bromery noted 
that, when he first came to the University, there was a large number 
of students flunking out. With the advent of the CCEBS program, 
the aim was to bring in disadvantaged students and help make sure 
they made it through. This is what the University should be 
concerned about in the area of support services — making sure 
students survive their years at the University, Dr. Bromery concluded 

President Wood believes that the policy statement is 
acceptable and deals with the problem that the working group was 
charged to investigate. The statement sets forth a general policy 
for the University to follow with regard to minority students in 
particular and students in general. 

Chairman Rowland stated that it has been almost a year 
since the Student Activities Committee first became concerned 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with the problems of minority students on the Boston campus. She 
is satisfied with the policy statement as set forth in Document 
T72-126 . Trustee Shaler also agreed that the statement meets the 
needs of the University community and suggested that an ongoing 
evaluation of the policy will be necessary. 

Other topics that were discussed dealt with 
male/female ratios, student/faculty ratios, and handicapped student^. 
The Committee in general was satisfied with the statement. 

Trustee Troy was concerned with the phrase "new 
standards of performance" in section five. He felt that the word 
"faculty" should be inserted before "performance." Chancellor 
Bromery said that this referred to both faculty and students. 
Chancellor Broderick noted that there were new ways of appraising 
performance and skill. That is, a combination of performance in 
the field and in the classroom. 

A question was raised by Dr. Preston regarding the 
wording in the first sentence of paragraph two" ... support services 
designed to be preventive rather than merely remedial." He felt 
that the University should be facilitating and broadening areas 
for minority students to release creative energy. The use of the 
word "preventive" has negative overtones, he said.. The Committee 
agreed and it was suggested that the wording be changed to 
"encourage creativity." 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To change the word "blight" in paragraph one of 

Document T72-126 , to "decay" and to insert "encourage 
creativity" in place of "be preventive rather than 
merely remedial" in the first sentence of paragraph 
two. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the proposed Trustee Statement on Counseling, 
Advising, and Support Services as outlined in Document 
T72-126 , as revised by the above vote. 

It was further moved, seconded and 

VOTED : Not to add the word "faculty" in section five of 

Document T72-126 which would have changed the sentence 
to read: "new standards of faculty performance." 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 




lobert J [/McCartney 
Secretary, Board of TjfiAstees 



390 



Student Act. 
4-13-72 



Comm. 



Proposed Trustee 
Statement on 
Counseling, 

Advising, and 
Support Services 
(Doc. T72-126) 



3906 

COMMITTEE 


UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE 

ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

April 14, 1972; 12:30 p.m. 
Board Room, Whitmore Building, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff: 

Chairman Haigis, President Wood; Trustees Crowley, 
Maginnis; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; 
Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests: 


r 


UM/Amherst — 
Petition to 


Office of the President: Vice President Phillips 

Office of the Secretary: Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst: Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice Chancellor 
Gage, Vice Chancellor Campion; Mr. Burke, rep. Faculty 
Senate; Director of Planning Littlefield, Director of 
Physical Plant Norton, Chief Project Engineer Ryan; 
Dr. Shapiro, Botany; Messrs. Jarnis and Nylen, engineer 
and architect; Director of Security Johnston, Messrs. 
Apostola and Meade 

UM/Boston: Chancellor Broderick, Director of Planning 
and Development O'Brien 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Stockwell 

Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 12:30 p.m. 

The Petition to Rename 50 Percent of the Buildings on the 


i 


Rename 50% of 
Buildings for 
Women 

UM/Amherst — 
Name John 
Chandler 
Laboratory at 
Horticultural 
Research Center 
(Doc. T72-122) 


Amherst Campus for Women and to name the new library for Sojourner 
Truth was accepted, reviewed, and referred for study and future 
consideration. 

The Massachusetts Fruit Growers' Association, Inc., which 
gave the Horticultural Research Center land and buildings in 
Belchertown to the University in June 1962 requested, through the 
Trustees of the Horticultural Research Fund, that the new teaching 
and research laboratory be named the John Chandler Laboratory 
(Doc. T72-122). Mr. Chandler, now deceased, served as a Trustee, 
1924-41, and again during his term as Commissioner of Agriculture, 
1948-51. The Massachusetts Fruit Growers' Association plans to meet 
at the Belchertown facility on July 12 and is suggesting that date 
for the dedication of the building. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
new teaching and research laboratory at the 
Horticultural Research Center, Belchertown, 
UM/Amherst, be named the John Chandler Laboratory 

and that the dedication be held on July 12, 1972. 


i 



II 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



3907 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Director of Planning Littlef ield, UM/ Amherst, reviewed 
the status of the Botany Greenhouses (four greenhouse ranges plus 
head house connecting to Morrill) and requested Approval of the 
Working Drawings and Specifications (Doc. T72-111 ) . He displayed 



architect's drawings visualizing the location in relation to the 
Morrill Science Building. The $225,000 available is not sufficient 
to include landscaping, which will be combined with the overall 
jeautif ication planned when North Pleasant Street is turned over to 
the University. Mr. Norton noted that the facilities will be heated 
by thin tube steam radiation supplied from the main system in 
Morrill. Replying to a question on the outside appearance, Mr. 
Littlefield said there will be a mesh (or latticework) screen 
rather than whitewash. The target completion date is November 1, 
1972. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the working drawings and specifications for 
the Greenhouse Project (Item 8082-61 Chapter 976, 
Acts of 1971) and authorize advertisement of the 
Project for public bidding subject to prior review 
of the formal documents and final estimates by the 
Office of the President, and transmittal of copies 
of appropriate record documents to the Bureau of 
Building Construction. 

Mr. Littlefield then turned to the DPW Progress Prints 
of the North Pleasant Street Replacement Roads , noting that the 
University will receive title to the section bisecting the campus 
as soon as the Amherst Selectmen are satisfied that Phases 2 and 
3 are going to be done. It now appears that the DPW will have a 
design hearing in September for Phases 1 and 2 and a corridor 
hearing for Phase 3 which might result in a simultaneous closing 
of North Pleasant Street and title transfer when Phases 1 and 2 
are completed. Mr. Littlefield recommended that planning for the 
landscaping along North Pleasant Street be started now and 
suggested that such a planning program be developed for review by 
the Trustees and then submitted to Sasaki Dawson and Demay for 
their recommendations. He will keep the Committee informed on 
developments. Treasurer Johnson pointed out that an area north- 
west of the campus is the only open land left within the road 
system and recommended that the Trustees urge DPW to preserve it 
for the University. Chairman Haigis stated that the request will 
be taken to DPW with the Committee's insistence that the maximum 
land area possible be preserved. 

The Committee then considered the architect ' s drawings 
of the three Modular Buildings (Doc. T72-110 ) , Site C, east of the 
Marks Meadow playground (Education); Site AD, bounded by the 
Chancellor's Drive and Infirmary road (Academic East and Mental 
Health); and Site J, former lacrosse field between Boyden and Hicks 
(Academic West). Following introductory remarks by Mr. Littlefield, 
particular attention was directed by the landscape architect, Mr. 
Nylen, to individual aspects of the siting and visual enhancement 
of each building, efforts to preserve trees and land contours, 
and the general blending in relation to existing buildings . Samples 



CB & G Comm. 
4-14-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Approval of 
Working Drawings 
and Specifications 
Doc. T72-111 



UM/Amherst — 
Modular Buildings 
Approval of Pro- 
posed Site Devel- 
opment, Color 
Selection, Exterioi 
(Doc. T72-110 ) 



3908 

B & G Comm. 
4-14-72 



UM/Amherst — 
Modular Buildings, 
Approval of Pro- 
posed Site Devel- 
opment, Color 

„ , ,_. COMMITTEE 

Selection, 
Exterior 
(Doc. T72-110) 



UM/Amherst — 
Western Mass. 
Electric Company 
Contract 
(Doc. T72-117) 



UM/Amherst — 
Conveyance of Land 
to Town of Amherst 
for Sewer Dis- 
posal Plant 
Expansion 
(Doc. T72-114) 



UM/Amherst — 
Approval of 
Campus Traffic 
Sign Locations 
(Doc. T72-130) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

of the recommended exterior and fascia material were examined by 
the Committee. Mr. Haigis commended the presentation by Mr. Nylen 
and requested him to check the wear qualities of the sand spray 
material which might tend to flake. After brief further discussion, 
it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the schematic plans showing site layout, 
treatment, and development of the three modular 
building sites and the color selection for exterior 
material, fascia material, and carpet material for 
the three modular buildings at UM/Amherst. 

As voted by the Board on March 28, Vice Chancellor 
Campion has pursued several questions regarding the Western 
Massachusetts Electric Company Contract, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-117 ) . 
Among other things, he reported that, although not presently 
considered economical, the University will have the right to 
install 1000 KW additional generating equipment. Regarding the 
"forgiveness clause" WMECO has never issued such a contract to any 
customer. However, acceptance of the New Agreement is still being 
recommended. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the Agreement for the Sale of Electricity, 
Trustees of University of Massachusetts and Western 
Massachusetts Electric Company, for UM/Amherst. 

Treasurer Johnson displayed a map showing the area being 
proposed for Conveyance of Land to the Town of Amherst for Sewer 
Disposal Plant Expansion (Doc. T72-114 ) . After brief discussion, 
it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
agree in principle to convey approximately eight 
and one-half (8.5) acres of land in Hadley lying 
easterly of and adjacent to state highway Route 116 
to the Town of Amherst for sewage treatment 
facilities as provided for in House Bill No. 
4772, subject to review by the Chancellor, UM/Amherst. 

Director of Planning Littlefield then distributed a 
Monthly Progress Report on Construction , UM/Amherst, noting some 
minor changes in status since the previous report. Chairman Haigis 
commented that the Committee should schedule site visits for 
acceptance of some of the projects soon. 

Mr. Johnston, Director of Security, UM/Amherst, displayed 
a detailed map of Campus Traffic Sign Locations (Doc. T72-130) , 
which must be approved by the Trustees before the court will 
enforce penalties for violations. He also mentioned raising the 
speed limit from 20 to 30 miles an hour on the main campus roads 
and changes from no parking to tow zone in selected areas. Dr. Gage 
stated that there are expected to be about 15,500 cars registered 
on campus next year. He also mentioned that a Parking Proposal is 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

going to the Finance Committee on April 19. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the Campus Traffic Sign Locations, UM/Amherst 

as detailed in Document T72-130 on file in the 
Office of the Secretary. 

Director of Planning and Development O'Brien, UM/Boston, 
then reviewed the Monthly Progress Report on Construction at 
Columbia Point . The opening of Phase I buildings is still planned 
for September, 1973; although the buildings are running two months 
behind schedule and the target date may not be met. The draft of a 
conveyance of land from the University to the MDC for construction 
of a grade-separated interchange at Morrissey Boulevard will be 
ready for Committee consideration in May. Mr. O'Brien proposed that 
the Committee review the schematic drawings of the three Phase Ila 
buildings on or about June 15, and the preliminary drawings on or 
about August 15. He spoke also about Item A3, Transit, indicating 
that a bill now before the Legislature had been reported favorably 
out of Education and would be heard by Ways and Means. The MBTA 
is involved and has secured a DOT Grant to study the transit 
connection. Vollmer Associates will carry out this work. Discussioiji 
is also underway with the MBTA on possible provision of bus service 
when the Columbia Point campus opens. 

Brief reference was made to progress on Phase lib 
buildings. The critical date for a decision will be the summer of 
1973 when it must be decided whether or not to proceed with 
College Building 050. 

Chancellor Broderick, UM/Boston, presented the name of 
John J. Carpenter for appointment. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the appointment of John J. Carpenter as a 
Special Police Officer UM/Boston. 

Treasurer Johnson reviewed the Land Acquisition plan for 
Wigwam Hill, UM/Worcester, specifically detailing property currently 
available from William and Rosalie Catalina. They are willing to 
enter into an agreement with final conveyance on or before 
November 1, 1972. Because of budget restrictions, President Wood 
commented, the Syrian Church purchase should be resolved before 
proceeding with this acquisition. It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that inasmuch as 
there exists an opportunity to purchase a certain 
parcel of real estate for the University of Massachu- 
setts for use of the Medical School in Worcester, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the University of 
Massachusetts, be authorized to sign an agreement to 



3909 



B & G Comm. 
4-14-72 

UM/Amherst -- 
Approval of 
Campus Traffic 
Sign Locations 
(Doc. T72-130) 



UM/Boston -- 
John J. Carpenter 
Special Police 
Officer 



UM/Worcester -- 
Land Acquisition, 
Wigwam Hill, 

Catalina Property 



3910 

B & G Comm. 
4-14-72 

UM/Worcester-- 
Land Acquisition 
Wigwam Hill 
Catalina Property 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester -- 
Monthly Progress 
Report on 
Construction 

Consultant -- 
Harold Roth 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

purchase such real estate described as follows-- 
property owned by William A. Catalina and Rosalie 
A. Catalina situated at 8 Mohican Road, Worcester, 
Worcester County, Massachusetts and more particularly 
described as being a portion of Lots 82,83,84, and 85 
on Plan entitled, "Belgrade Terrace" by Herbert A. 
Pratt, Civil Engineer, dated 1913 and recorded with 
Worcester District Registry of Deeds, Plan Book 24, 
Plan 73, and that the agreed purchase price for 
said property be twenty-six thousand five hundred 
dollars ($26,500.00), and that the conveyance be 
subject to the conditions of agreement set forth in 
the real estate purchase and sale agreement. 

Mr. Stockwell reported that the construction contract 
for the Teaching Hospital has been signed, the anticipated opening 
of the building being the fall of 1975. Other construction is 
progressing well. 

President Wood informed the Committee that a search 
has been made to find a replacement for Dr. Bush-Brown, previous 
consultant on Master Plan and Construction, to proceed with 
academic facilities planning capabilities. A Yale architect, 
Harold Roth of New Haven, appears to be a suitable choice and will 
be invited to serve initially on a limited appointment basis. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:15 p.m. 




Rob 

Secreta! 



McCartney 
y, Board of Tru? 




ees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON INTER- COLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

April 15, 1972, 10:30 a.m., Lincoln, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Chairman Gordon 
Trustee Sandwen 
Trustee elect Ladd 
Consultants: Chancellor Bromery 

Prof. George Richason 
Vice President Lashman 
Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Chairman Gordon convened the meeting at 10:30 a.m. and 
presented the background surrounding the formation of this special 
Committee. He noted that an evaluation by the Board of Trustees 
of the inter-collegiate athletic policy is long overdue. There- 
fore, the purpose of the Committee, in consultation with all 
appropriate parties, is to provide the Board with a clear policy 
on inter-collegiate athletics on the Amherst campus. 

It was noted that there were two activities against which 
the Committee will be acting: 

(1) Presidents of Yankee Conference meeting June 23, 
1972, and (2) The search for an Athletic Director on the Amherst 
campus . 

Following are highlights from the general discussion at 
the meeting: 

SCOPE : 

(1) Study of the University relationship with the Yankee 
Conference, including scholarships, freshman participation, and 
sports . 

(2) Committee effort is to develop a policy recommendatiojn 
that will allow UM/Amherst to participate in Inter-Collegiate 
Athletics at a level where it can effectively compete with the best 
teams New England has to offer. 

(3) Review of the facilities already established and 
discussion of those needed. 

(4) Discussion of the goals and functions of inter- 
collegiate athletics including the university development program 
and alumni support. 

(5) The educational aspect of sports. 

(6) Questions regarding the properties of the University. 

(7) The cost-effectiveness of this program vs. other 
university programs. 

Future Plans : 

(1) To meet about every two weeks with the hope of 
developing a policy statement by June 1, 1972. 

(2) To consult with Dean Bischoff , Assistant Athletic 
Director O'Connell and others as appropriate. 



3911 



3912 

4-15-72 



UM/Amherst -- 
Inter- Collegiate 
Policy on 
Athletics 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(3) To consult with coaches and former Athletic Director 
McGuirk at a future meeting. 

(4) To gather pertinent background information. 

The next meeting was called for April 30, 1972, at 1 P.M. at the 
Chancellor's house of the Amherst campus. The meeting adjourned 
at 2:40 p.m. 



r 




Robert J ^./McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
April 19, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT : Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret; Trustees 

Crowley, Rowland; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, 
Assistant Secretary Rawn, recorder 

Administrators , Faculty, Staff and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips and 
Lashman; Mr. Gartenberg 

UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor Campion; Acting Vice 
Chancellor Gage; Nick Apostola, rep. Student Senate 
Academic Affairs Committee; Steve Tripoli, rep. Collegian ; 
Michael Gregory, Elliot Sherman, rep. Student Senate; 
James Perry, Special Assistant to the Chancellor for 
Alumni Affairs; Steven Rider, rep. WMPIRG 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Thor Olson, Director of 
Administration and Finance; Professor Weaver, rep. 
University Senate 

UM/ Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. 

The Committee first considered the Suggested Revision of 
Policy and Procedures for Fund Transfers , the April 11, 1972, 
revision of the February 10, 1972, memorandum- - Document T72-123. 
Chairman Pumphret pointed out that Mrs. Knowles was absent, but that 
she and the rest of the Committee wanted to make sure there were 
adequate safeguards in the proposed revision. Chairman Pumphret saic 
that, based on his review of the document, he thought there were 
adequate safeguards for the Trustees in granting .this authority to 
the President. 

It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the suggested revision of the policy pro- 
cedure for fund transfers as set forth in the 
memorandum of April 11, 1972 (Doc. T72-123 ) . 

The Committee next considered the Personnel Protection 
Policy for Automobile Liability . Chairman Pumphret pointed out 
that the plan was a very good arrangement for the University. 
Trustee Crowley queried how no-fault insurance does not apply to 
state automobiles. No-fault property insurance provisions could, 
however, create certain problems. This program basically insures 
the operators rather than insuring the vehicle. Because it was 
given to the Committee for its information, there was no vote taken 
on this item. 



3913 



Revised Policy 
and Procedures- 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T72-123) 



Personnel 

Protection 

Policy 



3914 

Fin. Comm. 
4-19-72 

Banks- 
Deposit of 
Operating Funds 



COMMITTEE 



University- 
Accounting 
System Project 
(Doc. T72-112 ) 

UM/ Amherst- - 
Signature 
Authorization, 
William J. Hogan 
and Michael P. 
Sullivan 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee next considered the issue of the 
Designation of Additional Savings Banks for Deposit of Operating 
Fund Balances ■ The suggested list of banks has not been received 
by Treasurer Johnson yet, but it was the Committee's feeling that th 
University should deposit some of its money in savings banks with 
which it is not presently associated. Nick Apostola, representing 
the Student Senate, UM/Amherst, asked whether the Committee was 
considering depositing some funds with banks in the ghetto areas of 
the state. Chairman Pumphret responded that banks granting 5%% 
interest were to be preferred. At the same time he suggested that 
Mr. Apostola recommend to Treasurer Johnson certain savings banks 
that particularly serve the ghetto areas. Such suggestions would 
be considered by the Treasurer's Office. Chairman Pumphret also 
pointed out that, although the certificate of deposit market was 
low at the moment, if it improved, certain monies might be placed 
in that market, in the future. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize the placement of surplus University 
operating funds in savings accounts to be 
selected by the Treasurer of the University with 
the approval of the Chairman of the Board. 

For the Committee's information, the University Accounting 



UM/Amherst-- 
Proposed Increase 
in Residence 
Hall Rental Rates 
(Doc. T72-120) 



System Project (Document T72-112 ) has been distributed. 



Treasurer Johnson introduced a motion to authorize 
William J. Hogan and Michael P. Sullivan, University Controller's 
Office/Amherst, to sign certain documents, invoices, and return 
of advances in the absence of William H. Maus , Controller, or 
under his authority. The Treasurer noted that Controller Maus 
and Director DeNyse have requested this motion. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that William J. 
Hogan and Michael P. Sullivan, University 
Controller's Office/ Amherst, in the absence of 
William H. Maus, Controller, or under his authority 
be authorized to sign state Batch Transmittal 
Documents, Standard Invoices, and Return of Advances 
certifying expenditures to the State Comptroller 
and State Cash Receipts Vouchers and Request for 
Advances for the State Treasurer/ 

The Committee next considered the question of the Proposed 
Changes in the Dormitory Rental Rates for fiscal year 1973. 
(Document T72-120 ) Vice Chancellor Campion presented the campus 
proposal on the matter and pointed out that their recommendations 
were being made after long and deliberate consultation with all 
segments of the Amherst student community. The result of these 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

negotiations is a proposed $30 increase in the annual rental rate 
of each room except for rooms in the new Sylvan complex for which 
rents would not be raised. The $30 increase, instead of increases 
ranging from $49 to $64, is made possible by the change in the 
21-year-old policy. Heretofore, a student was allowed to live off 
campus if he reached 21 years of age at any time during the academic 
year. Under the proposed policy, a student must be 21 years old at 
the beginning of the semester to qualify for off-campus housing. 
Vice Chancellor Gage pointed out that, in principle, he felt that 
creating more restrictive rules was going in the wrong direction, 
but in this particular situation the detriment to approximately 
700 students (who would be affected by this change in the 21-year- 
old policy) had to be balanced against the benefits to the 11,500 
students who would not get as large an increase in their room rate. 

At this point, two students from the Student Senate passed 
out a letter to the Committee from the Rent and Fees Committee of 
the Student Senate (Doc. T72-133 ) . Chairman Pumphret pointed out 
that the four problems set forth in the document were very valid and 
perhaps a fifth should have been added regarding the effect of 
inflation on cost over which the University has no control. However 
he thought, given the current legislative climate, that this was a 
very bad time to go to the Legislature with requests for more money. 
Also, he thought that the students should focus on one or two of thege 
issues and prepare specific legislative proposals with complete 
documentation. 

Nick Apostola, a student, thought that the Trustees 
should take a firm stand on keeping down the UM/Amherst room and 
board costs. Chairman Pumphret suggested that the students 
participate in a study of the Building Authority's problems in this 
regard so that a more complete program could be prepared for 
presentation to the Legislature. 

Trustee Crowley said an arrangement should be worked out 
so that classroom and office space in the residence halls could be 
used without extra charges being levied on the students. 

Vice Chancellor Campion observed that a distinction should 
be kept in mind between the state-owned residence halls and the 
Building Authority residence halls. 

Chairman Pumphret said that legislation might be needed 
and, if developed in proper form, he would possibly support it in 
order to combine academic and living arrangements under a single 
roof. The Chairman thought that the students should sit down with 
Mr. Cass and discuss the legislative route. Some comments were made 
on the fact that reserves were not being kept for replacement of 
furniture in certain of the accounts, but it was pointed out that 
the Amherst campus has a capital outlay request for extensive reno- 
vations of the state-owned residence halls. There was a sense of 
agreement between the Committee and the student representatives 
that a working arrangement could be set up so that both could be 
continually involved in a cooperative venture of setting up some 
alternative solutions to the current problems. 



39; 

Fin. Comm. 
4-19-72 



o 



UM/Amherst -- 
Proposed Increase 
in Residence Hall 
Rental Rates 
(Doc. T72-120) 



3916 

Finance Coram. 
4-19-72 

UM/ Amherst — 
Proposed Increase 
in Residence Hall 
Rental Rates 
(Doc. T72-120 ) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst -- 
Room Telephone 
Rate Change 
(Doc. T72-121) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Transportation/ 
Parking Proposal 
Stage One- 
Part III, 
(Doc. T72-129) 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees, that if 
adopted by the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority, the following charges, 
reflecting an annual $30 across-the-board 
increase, except in Project #12, for student 
accommodations in dormitories of the Authority 
be approved effective September 1, 1972: 



Project 


Annual 


Per Semester 


Dormitories 


Charge 


Charge 


First Project 


$580 


$290 


Twelfth Project 


$700 


$350 


All Other 






Projects 


$640 


$320 


It was also 




VOTED : To 


recommend 


to the Board 



Daily Charge for Periods 
Less than One Semester 



$2.70 
$3.25 

$2.95 



September 1, 1972, the following be and hereby is 
established as the schedule of charges for student 
accommodations in dormitories in the Residence Hall 
Trust Fund. Such charges reflect an annual $30 
across-the-board increase over previous rates. 



Condition 



Annual 
Charge 



Per Semester 
Charge 



Daily Charge for Periods 
Less than One Semester 



Unrenovated $580 $290 
Renovated $640 $320 



$2.70 
$2.95 



The Student Telephone Rate Change (Doc. T72-121 ) was then 
presented to the Committee. After a short discussion, it was 
moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees, effective 

September 1, 1972, that the following be and hereby 
is established as a per student fee to be charged 
for room telephone service in dormitories now 
serviced by the Amherst dormitory centrex telephone 
system: 

$19 per student per semester; or 

$1.30 per week for periods of less than one semester 

Next, the Committee considered the Transportation/Parking 
Proposal —first stage (Doc. T72-129 ) . Acting Vice Chancellor Gage, 
newly appointed coordinator of the Amherst campus parking proposals, 
made the presentation and pointed out that this was one part of a 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

three-part overall campus response to the parking and transportation 
problem. The three parts consist of: (1) a new system of traffic 
and parking signs for the entire campus, already approved by the 
Buildingsand Grounds Committee; (2) the revision of the parking 
regulations themselves, which will be ready for Committee approval 
next month; and (3) an overall transportation and parking proposal. 

The document given to the Committee is the first stage of 
that third part of the overall plan. Because the Committee felt 
that all the operational recommendations on page 3 of this document 
were applicable and all would be covered by the following two votes 
it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that effective 
September 1, 1972, there be established an annual 
fee of $5.00 per primary vehicle and a fee of $2.00 
for each replacement vehicle which any student, faculty 
or staff member registers for parking on campus. 

It was also moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

authorization be granted to install 250 parking meters 
on campus. Approximately 150 of the meters are to 
be installed in the Haigis Mall area and the 
remaining 100 in other inner parking areas. 

Next, the Committee mentioned the proposal being made by 
the Western Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group for a 
special fee. This special fee is generally supported by the 
students at UM/Amherst. Mrs. Rowland, Chairman of the Student 
Activities Committee, pointed out that her Committee had fully 
considered the proposal, had talked at length with the student 
groups involved in the planning of the program, and had felt that 
it would be a valuable educational program for the campus. She 
pointed out that the only remaining question concerned the legality 
of the fee collection system. She indicated that University Counsel 
was reviewing those legal problems at the moment. Chairman 
Pumphret suggested that the Student Activities Committee make a 
decision on the legality of the fee, and he assured Mrs. Rowland 
that his Committee would follow her subsequent recommendation. If 
possible, before the next Board of Trustees meeting, a legal opinior 
will be secured. Otherwise, an opinion will be secured so that it 
will be ready for consideration by the Student Activities Committee 
and the full Board in May. 

Next, the Committee considered the Student Health Fee 
(Doc. T72-128 ) . After a short presentation by Acting Vice 
Chancellor Gage, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
September 1,1972, there be established a student 
health fee of $38.50 per semester. 



391' 



Finance Comm. 
4-19-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Transportation/ 
Parking Proposal 
Stage One- 
Part III, 
(Doc. T72-129) 



UM/ Amherst- - 
Western Massachu- 
setts Public 
Interest Research 
Group 
(Doc. T72-116) 



UM/Amherst-- 

Student Health 

Fee Increase, 

1972 

(Doc. T72-128) 



3918 

Finance Comm. 
4-19-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T72-127) 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Bos ton- 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T72-127) 



UM/Worcester-- 
Fund Transfers 
(Doc. T72-127) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee next considered the Recommended Fund 
Transfers between Subsidiary Accounts (Doc. T72-127 ) . After a 
short discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the fund 
transfers between subsidiary accounts recommended 
in Document T72-127 as detailed below all be approved. 



r 



For UM/Amherst: 






From Account 01 




$119,150 


To Accounts : 


$33,450 




02 




03 


25,000 




05 


7,500 




11 


13,200 




14 


40,000 


$119,150 



For UM/Boston 



From Accounts : 



01 


$15,000 


08 


8,000 


13 


29,500 


15 


13,000 


16 


12,000 



To Accounts: 




03 


$30,000 


10 


5,000 


12 


7,500 


14 


35,000 



For UM/Worcester: 



$77,500 



f 



$77,500 



From Accounts : 






01 


$167,000 




11 


6,000 


$173,000 


To Accounts : 




03 


$56,000 




08 


25,000 




12 


23,000 




13 


34,000 




14 


5,000 




16 i 


30,000 


$173,000 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



l 



l 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:00 noon. 



<\j<Lf / 




Robert J./ McCartney 
Secretary^ Board of Trustees 



3919 



Finance Comm. 
4-19-72 



3920 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS, 

UM/ Amherst 
April 30, 1972; 1:30 p.m.; Chancellor's House, Amherst 

Present : Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Gordon, Trustees Abrams and Ladd; Secretary 
McCartney 

President's Office: Vice President Lashman 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Dean Bischoff ; Professor 
Richason, Chairman of the Athletic Council/ Assistant 
Director of Athletics O'Connell; Lee Sandwen, Consultant 

Invited Guests : Paul Marx, President, Associate Alumni 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Gordon at 1:30 p.m. 
Mr. Gordon noted that the charge to this Committee is narrow, deep 
and short. No assumptions can be made which are not rebuttable, 
and the Trustees have charged the Committee with reviewing 
intercollegiate athletic policy for UM/Amherst, within the frame- 
work of the following question: Should the University compete in 
intercollegiate athletics with the best in New England on an equal 
basis in those sports that we desire to compete in? Obviously, the 
principal focus will be on the major sports: football, basketball, 
hockey. Hopefully, by June, recommendations can be forwarded to 
the Board of Trustees so that a policy may be developed that 
everyone can live with. The discussion moved to a question period 
involving the University officials and other guests present. 
Dr. David Bischoff, Dean of the School of Physical Education, 
Acting Director of Athletics and Special Assistant to the Provost 
for Athletics Affairs, reported that the School of Physical 
Education is divided into five departments as follows: 

Physical Education for Men 
Physical Education for Women 
Recreation 
Exercise Science 
Athletics 

Programs run from the Ph.D. through the Master's Degree 
and down through majors in the various departments. For example, 
Sociology of Sports, History of Sports, Psychology of Sports. In 
Recreation there are many options including Hospital Recreation, 
Municipal Recreation, Commercial Recreation Development. The 
Department of Exercise Science is involved with respiratory 
physiologists, motor integration and bio-mechanics. 

School of Physical Education Statistics 

Undergraduate majors--700 

Graduate students--80 

Faculty--70 

Maintenance budget--salaries--$l. 2 million, of which 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

non-athletics equals $800,000 plus approximately $450,000 in 
athletics . 

Discussion followed on the question of the level on which inter- 
collegiate athletic competition should take place, with Trustee 
Ladd questioning why the University needed to compete with the best 
teams in New England on each equal terms in the sports in which we 
desire to so compete. The importance of competition to the individ- 
ual players; intercollegiate athletics as a logical extension of an 
excellent academic program; the importance to Alumni and the impact 
of winning teams on the General Court were all covered. 

Chairman Gordon produced figures (adjusted) which showed 
that the University was expending approximately $900,000 in the 
Athletic Department. Dean Bischoff questioned this asserting that 
approximately $800,000 was expended by the School of Physical 
Education on athletics only. 

Dean Bischoff and Assistant Athletic Director O'Connell 
reported that we are now engaged in 14 or 15 varsity sports; also, 
in ten junior varsity sports, and in two freshmen sports (basketball 
and football). All together, approximately 750 to 800 students 
are participating in intercollegiate athletics. 

Chairman Gordon queried how many varsity coaches have 
non-academic appointments, who they are and in what sports. Dean 
Bischoff responded as follows: 



NON -ACADEMIC APPOINTMENTS 



All football coaches 
Canniff and Kidd in hockey 
Assistant basketball coaches 
Mr. O'Brien in track 



11 



Chairman Gordon raised the question of whether the new 
Athletic Director should report to the Dean of Physical Education. 
Dean Bischoff responded, that in his opinion, the Athletic Director 
should report to him. He gave the following reasons: (1) because he 
believes the athletic program should exist as a logical extension 
of the academic program; (2) the Athletic Department, practically 
speaking, could not "make it on its own financially" without help 
from the School of Physical Education; (3) the Faculty Senate 
would raise serious questions about athletic positions funded on 
state funds in the guise of faculty positions. 

Chairman Gordon noted that the Commonwealth does have a 
state position listing called "Coach." 

Dean Bischoff noted further that the School of Physical 
Education faculty grants to the coaches the right to participate in 
various department decisions as members of the faculty; also, every 
coach teaches. However, they understand that, in certain sports, 
tenure will not be granted. 

Dean Bischoff added two other reasons why he felt the new 
Athletic Director should report to the Dean of the School of Physical 
Education: (1) the School of Physical Education and the Athletic 



3921 

Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
4-30-72 



3922 

Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
4-30-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Department use the same facilities; (2) Physical Education can use 
some state funds to assist the Department of Athletics. (Splitting 
the Department of Athletics off would increase costs 25 percent) . 

Chairman Gordon requested Messrs. Bischoff and O'Connell 
to supply the Committee with a report on the chain of command for 
athletic departments in Yankee Conference institutions as well as 
a representative group of East coast state universities including 
Rutgers, Delaware, etc. Professor Richason urged finding out not 
only how other schools are organized, but also why. He commented 
on the difficulties of those holding academic appointments who 
report to two individuals at approximately the same level. 

Trustee Gordon noted that there are some individuals who 
do not wish the position of Athletic Director if they report to a 
Dean of Physical Education. This, he said, is a problem that 
should be faced. Professor Richason noted that the Athletic Council 
had expressed some concern about the reporting line, adding that 
"an unsympathetic Dean could wreck the athletic program in two or 
three years." 

Chairman Gordon queried Assistant Director O'Connell on 
whether or not competing with the best New England universities 
on equal terms is an achievable possibility if the University 
remains within the Yankee Conference. Mr. O'Connell replied in the 
negative, with regard to football and basketball. 

Presently the limit in football and basketball is 80 
awards over a four-year period. However, in theory, you could now 
place all 80 awards in one sport. 

The Chairman noted that "to compete with the best in New 
England" must involve the Ivies and BC. This does not appear 
possible within present Yankee Conference regulations. For example, 
to maintain our present level in basketball and hockey, we "cannot 
make it" in football. 

Professor Richason noted that there is also a financial 
problem and that we cannot give 18 awards to football annually 
without putting basketball "out of the market." 

Mr. O'Connell asserted that—working on the 80 formula — 
Coach MacPherson would require 66 grants-in-aid to compete 
successfully with Harvard. (He has no more than 50 now). 

Discussion moved to the present Yankee Conference formula 
together with a summary of expenditures in various sports at UM/ 
Amherst. The statistics follow: 

The Statistical Picture 

The Yankee Conference formula is 80 persons times $2025 
for basketball and football, representing the present limitation on 
dollars to be spent by UM/Amherst. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The dollar formula at Rhode Island and Connecticut is 
approximately the same. 

By the same formula, Boston University's dollar factor 
equals $3800; Holy Cross equals $3500; the University of Vermont 
equals $2600. 

Thus, the present Yankee Conference dollar limitation for 
expenditures in basketball and football at UM/Amherst total $162,000 

Presently, UM/Amherst expends approximately $110,000 on 
football and $36,000 in basketball for a total of $146,000. 



The totals for other sports: 



Hockey 
Baseball 
Track 
Wrestling 



$29,000 

11,000 

5,000 

8,000 



The current debt service on athletic buildings is as 



follows 



Stadium 



$80,000 annually plus $20,000 
maintenance 



Currently, we are paying in rental and travel to other 
colleges approximately $10,000 annually to Amherst College for 
practice and games in hockey at Orr Rink.. 



Attendance Averages--1968-1972 

Football 

Basketball 

Hockey 



14,000 per game 

3,500 per game (ten-game season 

800 per game average) 



3923 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
4-30-72 



Chairman Gordon requested a check out of stadium attendanc 
figures in 1965-1966 to be correlated with the attendance in 1962- 
1964. 

Professor Richason observed that basketball and hockey 
attendance would be higher if facilities had more capacity. 

Chairman Gordon asked what new facilities are needed. 
Dean Bischoff responded as follows in order of priority; 

1. "Ice facility", possibly in combination with something 
else, capacity for 4000 to 6000 persons. 

2. Locker room complex 

3. Basketball arena; capacity: 12,000 



3924 

Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
4-30-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gordon suggested that, so as not to overbuild, a 
"several-roofed, convertible, auditorium- -type complex" might be 
constructed to cover several of these needs. It was decided that 
this is feasible. A preliminary study done on the ice facility- 
locker room complex is estimated to run $3.5 to $4 million dollars. 

Vice President Lashman inquired about the split between 
paid gate receipts and the student athletic fee. Mr. O'Connell 
responded that approximately 56 percent of the students exchanged 
coupons for tickets in 1969 (out of 15-16000 undergraduates that 
year) so that about 8,000 attended, and 5,000 non-students. The 
Vermont games draws only approximately 1,000 non-students. 

Chairman Gordon queried Professor Richason whether the 
Athletic Council agrees with the assumption "we should compete with 
the best in New England on equal terms, etc." Mr. Richason 
responded in the affirmative, adding that he personally did not 
feel that this could be achieved within the framework of the Yankee 
Conference. 

Discussion turned to scheduling difficulties in view of 
the fact that football games are generally scheduled as far ahead 
as ten years. It was agreed that, even if membership in the Yankee 
Conference were dropped, the University would perhaps continue to 
play Connecticut, Rhode Island, Holy Cross, BU, and New Hampshire. 
Possible replacements for Maine and Vermont could be found among 
Rutgers, Bucknell, Colgate, Delaware or Cornell. Mr. O'Connell 
observed that, presently, he has one open Saturday through 1979. 

Chairman Gordon said "you could get out of the Conference, 
pick up a couple of teams and survive." Mr. O'Connell said, "yes. 1 

Chancellor Bromery observed that we are "in a closed 
system." He speculated that the rest of the Yankee Conference 
would upgrade if we start to do so. Vice President Lashman 
disagreed. 

Chairman Gordon next queried the President of the 
Associate Alumni with regard to Alumni feeling in these matters. 
Mr. Marx responded that he could not fully express the sentiments 
of 40,000 minds, but he noted that the Alumni do wish to win a 
respectable number of games. He does not "detect sentiment to 
move into the big time." Obviously, he continued, the Alumni are 
not happy when we play a mismatch and get mangled three years in a 
row, etc. He added that many Alumni remember playing Yankee 
Conference opponents during their own college years and he agreed 
that there was a "small correlation" between winning games and the 
fluctuations in Alumni giving. He also reported an upsurge of 
interest in the Boston area in UMass hockey in the past few years. 

Chancellor Bromery stressed that he wished to understand 
his mandate from the Trustees "across the board," including 
intercollegiate athletics. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



3925 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dean Bischoff pleaded that the Committee understand that 
"we are in real financial difficulties." He urged attention to the 
grant-in-aid problem, noting that "we are going down $40-50,000 per 
year" and cannot go on more than one additional year without making 
cuts in the present level of support to intercollegiate athletic 
programs. He added that it has been a long-standing policy to fund 
athletics "across the board" including such sports as hockey and 
gymnastics which are non-Yankee Conference. 

Chairman Gordon observed that there is an enormous backlog 
of unmet needs in the academic scholarship area, so no funds are 
available from that source as long as 8-10,000 students are in need 
of financial assistance. He added that the Alumni revitalization 
program is now underway and one factor is a rejuvenated program in 
intercollegiate athletics. The General Court cannot supply the 
funds in these areas so whatever facilities might be contemplated 
will require a capital-gift campaign. He requested Mr. Marx to get 
a response on this issue from the Associate Alumni Board of Directors 
It is possible that part of the funds raised would go to facilities 
and part to non -athletic scholarships. 

Mr. Marx responded that we have some potentially large 
givers in the athletic area; however, the majority would give to 
scholarships and for general endowment purposes. He noted that the 
field of development (fund raising) is "an agonizing thing." 
There is no glamor route, he said, to get quickly to the level 
we would all like to be at. 

It was agreed that the next meeting of the Committee 
would take place in Boston or vicinity starting at 6:00 p.m. on 
May 8, with Chancellor Bromery, Mr. McGuirk, and Coach MacPherson 
invited along with Vice President Lashman and Secretary McCartney. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:10 p.m. 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
4-30-72 



1 







Robert J. M/Cartn^ 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



3926 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

UM/Amherst 
May 8, 1972; 6:00 p.m.; Holiday Inn, Newton, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Gordon, Trustee Abrams ; Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Office of the President : 
Vice President Lashman 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery,- Mr. Richard McPherson, 
Football Coach 

Invited Guest : 

Mr. Warren McGuirk, former Athletic Director, UM/Amherst 



Chairman Gordon convened the meeting at 7:15 p.m. and 
introduced to the Committee the invited guests, Mr. Richard McPherson 
Head Football Coach, and Mr. Warren McGuirk, former Athletic Director 
at the Amherst campus. The Chairman noted that this Committee was 
formed to develop a Trustee policy on intercollegiate athletics at 
the Amherst campus. It was with this in mind that the above-named 
consultants were invited to attend this meeting. 

The meeting was conducted as a question-and-answer period 
between the Committee members and the invited consultants. Following 
are highlights of the consultants' statements. 

COACH McPHERSON 

COMPETITION : 

1. When he came to the University, he was under the 
assumption (and desire) that the University (Amherst) 
should be able to compete with the best of New England. 

2. He believes that it is extremely important for our 
image and prestige that we compete on a good level. 
(A New England level.) 

3. He sees us narrowing the gap between the Ivy League 
and our League. There is a problem with the upper strata 
of the Ivy League which is very difficult to compete with 
(i.e., their image, alumni support, etc.). 

4. He feels that we need a little more assistance to 
compete at the best level. The problem, as he sees it, 
is a depth problem. He thinks that as long as we can 
get good people, we'll win--"if we put our goods with the 
right people." 

RECRUITMENT 

1. Other schools outschedule UMASS . 



392? 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. Boston College has a minimum of 100 scholarships 
every year on the playing field. 

3. We are restricted under Yankee Conference rules 
to a total of 80 scholarships between football and 
basketball. 

At this point, a brief discussion followed on recruitment 
and the CCEBS program. Chancellor Bromery informed the Committee 
that the CCEBS program is not directly related to athletics. Coach 
McPherson noted that there is a difficulty with NCAA that says we 
cannot recruit boys who do not predict a 1.6 average. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. In response to a question regarding an increase 

of scholarships, Coach McPherson felt that an increase 
would be helpful because of the need to have depth on 
the team. 

2. He expressed concern that the scholarships should 
be in monetary terms rather than numbers. 

It was observed that Coach McPherson has just finished one 
year of recruiting and, according to Mr. McGuirk, he has done a fine 
job--"the best in the last five years." 

Trustee Abrams noted that there are many more factors that 
have to be considered when discussing the improvement of any athletic 
team, and that these could not be put aside. 

WARREN McGUIRK 

Mr. McGuirk began his statements by focusing the Committee' 
attention on the Annual Report to the Faculty Senate this year which 
states that 1,280 athletes a year participate in intercollegiate 
athletics. He is very proud of these figures. This report also 
states that there are 17 formal programs at the Amherst campus. 

In presenting a brief history of the Athletic Department, 
Mr. McGuirk said that in the early 60' s the University was moving 
along quite well. Then the Yankee Conference formula became a 
reality. 

He feels that in order to compete against Boston College 
we have to go with depth and quality. He stated that an increase 
in scholarships would assist the football team. 

In response to a question regarding the Yankee Conference, 
Mr. McGuirk stated that he would consider increasing the membership 
of the Conference. He feels that we belong in the Conference and 
that we should encourage others to join. He said that we could still 
retain our Ivy date, since we would not have to play every team each 
year. 



Intercollegiate 
Athletic Comm. 
UM/ Amherst 
5-8-72 



3928 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
UM/Amherst 
5-8-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

PHYSICAL PLANT 

In response to questions regarding the athletic facilities 
on the Amherst campus, Mr. McGuirk remarked that we need some new 
facilities. His first priority would be for an ice rink that would 
be flexible enough to be used for many purposes. He suggests that 
the facility hold at least 4500 seats. 

Mr. McGuirk feels that our students' interests must be 
considered when discussing any increase in physical plant. 

Other needed facilities would be a basketball arena that 
would hold 10,000 persons as well as a locker room facility. 

In comparison, the new facility at the University of Notre 
Dame was noted. Their ice rink has a seating capacity of 4200 and th|e 
basketball facility seats 12,600 as well as other arrangements that 
can be accommodated by the Convocation Center. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The former Athletic Director reminded the Committee that 
the Athletic Department worked very hard at raising money for the 
last 15 years. He said there was no state or University money used 
for athletic scholarships. The Athletic Department raised $50,000, 
and former President Lederle earmarked this amount for the Athletic 
Department. 

Vice President Lashman voiced the concern expressed by 
other members of the Committee that were not in attendance at this 
meeting. This concern is that such a substantial amount of money 
should not be allocated into intercollegiate athletics — but rather 
to other programs. 

Mr. McGuirk stated that he did not agree. He feels strongly 
that there is nothing more important than a good intercollegiate 
athletic program. He also stated that we have scholarship commitment 
to our young men. This money, according to Mr. McGuirk, reflects the 
interest of the Board of Trustees and the Administration in inter- 
collegiate athletics. 

Mr. McGuirk feels that something should be done soon to 
keep our present quality in intercollegiate athletics. 

It was also pointed out to the Committee that not one penny 
of the student athletic fee goes to athletic scholarships. 

Chairman Gordon noted that the next meeting of the Committer 
would be scheduled upon Trustee Crowley's return. This meeting would 
consist of the Trustees and the Chancellor at Amherst for Committee 
deliberations. He thanked the consultants for their assistance. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was adjourned at 9:50 p.m. 





Robert J. MaCartney 
Secretary ,*- / Board of Trustees 




3929 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
UM/ Amherst 
5-8-72 



3930 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF SPECIAL TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS AT 

UM/AMHERST 

May 24, 1972; 6:00 p.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire St., Bostcjn 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Gordon, Trustees Crowley and Ladd; Ms. Pugh. 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President: Vice President Lashman 



Chairman Gordon convened the meeting at 6:30 p.m. Trustee 
Crowley, having just returned from abroad, made a few comments 
regarding intercollegiate athletics at UM/Amherst. He is interested 
in continuation of a quality program in athletics and feels that 
more member institutions should be added to the Yankee Conference. 

Trustee Crowley reminded the Committee that he was on the 
Search Committee for an Athletic Director which led to the appoint- 
ment of Warren McGuirk in 1949. He stated that Mr. McGuirk "did a 
great job in improving intercollegiate athletics at the Amherst 
campus ." 

The Committee reviewed the results of a survey made at 
Chairman Gordon's request by Assistant Athletic Director O'Connell 
regarding the line of reporting of athletic directors at other 
universities. 

The Chairman reminded the Committee of the time constraints 
surrounding the work of this Committee and the preparation of its 
report, namely: the Yankee Conference meeting, June 23, and the 
search for an athletic director at UM/Amherst. 

Vice President Lashman, reported that the President feels 
that--as long as he has the Committee's report and recommendations-- 
he will be prepared to go to the Yankee Conference meeting in June. 

The Committee then reviewed the figures established by the 
Yankee Conference on scholarships--80 scholarships for both football 
and basketball. Mr. Lashman presented the present figures computed 
on the average of tuition, all mandatory fees, and seven days room 
and board: 



UMASS 


$2035 (before tuitio 


Vermont 


2600 


Holy Cross 


3500 


Boston University 


3800 


Maine 




New Hampshire 




UCONN 


All $1900 - 2000 level 


Rhode Island 





1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

For the University of Massachusetts, 80 scholarships at 
the $2035 figure totaled would be a $162,800 maximum. The actual 
expenditure is $145,307. 

The Vice President then presented a breakdown of appro- 
priations for the individual sports at the Amherst campus: 



Football 

Basketball 

Baseball 

Gymnastics 

Hockey 

Lacrosse 

Soccer 

Track 

Wrestling 



$109,901 

35,406 

10,878 

10,336 

28,648 

2,000 

500 

5,000 

7,500 



Due to the recent tuition increase, money appropriated for 
football would have to be increased from the current level of 
$110,000 to $132,000 in order to maintain an equivalent level of 
support. 

Chairman Gordon then presented an outline of procedures 
he would like to follow in the next few weeks. First, the Committee 
at this meeting would draft the questions they are most concerned 
with. Then Trustee Gordon would draft a statement on these questions 
He would then send a copy to Chancellor Bromery for his input and 
suggestions. After the Chancellor's response, he will have this 
sent to the other members of the Committee for approval and recom- 
mendations . 

The questions the Committee decided on were as follows: 

1. The level of intercollegiate athletics in the sports 
we choose to compete in-- 

(a) reallocation of funds 

(b) the Yankee Conference 

(1) continued membership 

(2) request for added members 

(3) the formula and need questions 

(4) review by the Yankee Conference each 
3-5 years on all these questions 

2. The Athletic Director-- 

(a) the Search Committee composition 

(b) to whom the Athletic Director reports 



3931 



Intercollegiate 
Athletics Comm. 
UM/Amherst 
5-24-72 



3932 



Intercollegia te 
Athletics Comm. 
5-24-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

3. Further review by a subsequent Trustee Committee 
in three to five years 

4. Need for physical facilities 

The meeting was adjourned at 8:50 p.m. 





Robert J/ McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 




I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

May 26, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; Room 804, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret, Trustee 
Crowley; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. 
Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Ladd 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Phillips, 
Lashman, and Edelman 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn, Ms. Puj;h 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion, 
Acting Vice Chancellor Gage; Prof. Burke, representing 
Faculty Senate; Campus Center Manager Grinnan; Prof. 
Ludtke, Chairman of UM/Amherst Faculty Senate Budget Com- 
mittee; Messrs. Cohen and Richardson, representing Student 
Union Governing Board 

UM/ Boston: Chancellor Broderick 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. 

The Committee first considered the Rental Changes in 
Lincoln and University Apartments, UM/Amherst , to be effected July 1, 
1972 (Doc. T72-146 ) . The schedules resulted from negotiations 
carried on by the Housing Administration with the Married Student 
Housing Committee and student tenant groups. The increased rates, 
which were set according to a new formula based on square footage, 
are necessary to keep the apartments on a self- liquidating basis. 
It is expected that the $5.00 differential between the student and 
faculty-staff rates will be increased in the next schedule submitted 
to the Committee. Mr. Pumphret stated that this should be a per- 
centage rather than a dollar computation. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board; of Trustees that the 
following be established as the schedule of 
charges to be in effect July 1, 1972, for students 
who occupy nonBuilding Authority Married Student 
Apartments at the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, namely: 



University Apartments Old Rate 

Studio $ 72.00 

One-bedroom efficiency 90.00 



New Rate 7-1-72 

$ 80.00 
107.00 



3933 



UM/Amherst-- 
Rental Changes in 
Lincoln and Univer 
sity Apartments 
Doc. T72-146 



3934 



Finance Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Amherst- - 
Rental Changes in 
Lincoln and Univer 
sity Apartments 
Doc. T72-146 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Student Automatic 
Service Trust Fund 
Amendment 
Doc. T72-147 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

University Apartments 

One-bedroom 
Two-bedroom efficiency 
Two-bedroom 
Three-bedroom 

Lincoln Apartments 

Studio 

One-bedroom 

Two-bedroom 

The above charges include the cost of utilities (e.g., 
heat, electricity, water, and sewer taxes). 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

following be established as the schedule of charges 
to be in effect July 1, 1972, for faculty and staff 
who occupy non- Building Authority Married Student 
Apartments at the University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, namely: 



Old Rate 


New Rate 7-1-72 


$ 95.00 


$ 118.00 


100.00 


120.00 


105.00 


130.00 


120.00 


159.00 


Old Rate 


New Rate 7-1-72 


$ 72.00 


$ 99.00 


90.00 


108.00 


105.00 


113.00 



University Apartments 


Old Rate 


New Rate 7-1-72 


Studio 




$ 75.00 


$ 85.00 


One-bedroom effici 


ency 


93.75 


112.00 


One-bedroom 




100.00 


123.00 


Two-bedroom effici 


ency 


106.25 


125.00 


Two-bedroom 




112.50 


135.00 


Three-bedroom 




131.25 


164.00 


Lincoln Apartments 




Old Rate 


New Rate 7-1-72 


Studio 




75.00 


104.00 


One-bedroom 




93.75 


113.00 


Two-bedroom 




112.50 


118.00 



The above charges include the cost of utilities 
(e.g., heat, electricity, water, and sewer taxes). 

Turning to the Amendment to the Existing Vote on Student 
Automatic Service Trust Fund, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-147 ) , Chairman 
Pumphret noted that the changes bring the program up to date and in 
line with current policies. 



VOTED : 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Trustee vote of 10/16/65 (page 2766) on vending 
machine operation on the Amherst campus be 
amended to read as follows: 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

That all revenue derived from the operation of 
vending machines since July 1, 1965, be trans- 
ferred from the Athletic Trust Fund and Vending 
Machine Income account (Temporary Trust Fund) 
to the Student Automatic Service (Trust Fund) 
account; and that the Dean of Students be and 
he hereby is authorized to administer said 
funds; and that disbursements from the fund, 
in order of priority, shall provide for: 



I 



Expenses for administration of the program. 

Transfer annually to Lincoln, University 
and North Village Apartments (Building 
Authority Project 13) accounts of those 
revenues earned on vending operation in 
the Lincoln, University and North Village 
apartment complexes respectively. 

Transfer annually to the Athletic Trust 
Fund of an amount for scholarships to be 
granted to needy and worthy students as 
budgeted. 

Transfer of all remaining funds to the 
Residential Halls Cultural Enrichment 
Program. 



The Committee next considered the recommendation that the 
Stockbridge Student Fee, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-150 ) be increased 
$8.00 per year in the Stockbridge Activities Tax. This increase 
results from a budget developed by the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture Student Senate in conjunction with the University Under- 
graduate Student Senate and has the endorsement of the Director of 
the School, John W. Denison, and Acting Vice Chancellor Gage. 



393" 



Finance Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Amherst 
Student Automatic 
Service Trust 
Fund Amendment 
Doc. T72-147 



UM/Amherst- - 
Stockbridge 
Student Fee 
Doc. T72-150 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
following schedule of student activities taxes 
be established for students of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture for 1972-73. 

1st Semester 2nd Semester 
Class of 1973 



Class of 1974 

(2 full semesters) 

Class of 1974 

(placement students) 



$28.00 



28.00 



28.00 



$26.00 



25.00 



20.00 



3938 



Finance Comm. 
5-26-72 



UM/Amhers th- 
under graduate 
Student Activities 

TaX COMMITTEE 

Doc. T72-151 



UM/ Amherst — 
Campus Center Fee 
Doc. T72-152 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In presenting the proposed Undergraduate Student Activities 



Tax, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-151 ) , Trustee Pumphret commended the 
Student Senate for the small (1.2%) increase in their Student Activ- 
ities Tax Fund Budget for Fiscal 1972-73. While providing funds for 
more than 40 activities, it reduces the fee by $2.00. Trustee Ladd 
commented on the time and effort devoted to the budget by all groups 
involved and especially by the Budget Committee. In addition, 
Acting Vice Chancellor Gage noted the well-considered addition of 
certain student services with the concomitant removal of others. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Student Senate recommendation that 
the Student Activities Tax for the 1972-73 
academic year be $33.50, plus a DVP (Distinguished 
Visitors Program) tax of $1.50, making a total 
of $35.00. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the UM/Amherst Student Senate recommendation 
that the Senior Tax (Class of 1973) for 1972-73 
be established at $3.00 

The development of the Proposed Campus Center Fee, UM/Amher s 
(Doc. T72-152 ) , was detailed by Mr. Barry Cohen, Student Union 
Governing Board Chairman, and by Vice Chancellor Campion. The 
Governing Board has disbanded for the summer, leaving a proposed 
budget requiring a funding fee of $65.25 but requesting $60.00, 
while the Amherst Administration is recommending a $62.50 fee and 
removal of a $55,000 item. The students, Mr. Cohen said, feel they 
should not be required to subsidize the Campus Center without 
assuming some administrative authority. Chancellor Bromery had 
attempted to negotiate for a balanced budget, but now has no choice 
except to suspend the Governing Board's Constitution temporarily to 
permit the Trustees to set the recommended fee. 

Mr. Richardson, Chairman of the SUG Board's Finance Commit- 
tee, expressed his opposition to this action, stating that he would 
prefer to have the proposed $60.00 fee approved, although that would 
require a $100,000 reduction in the budget. Mr. Campion reiterated 
his support of the Chancellor's action and recommendation to the 
Committee. Trustee Crowley proposed the formation of a special com- 
mittee of Trustees, administration, and students to review the Campus 
Center funding structure at UM/Amherst, with special attention to 
inequities as related to student contributions. 



After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



and 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve a student fee of $62.50 for the Campus 
Center-Student Union Complex for FY 1973, thus 
making possible a balanced Student Union Govern- 
ing Board budget with the removal of an item 
of $55,000 for increasing student hourly wages; 
also, that they authorize the Finance Committee 
to proceed with the appointment of a special, 
joint Trustee-administration-student subcommittee 
to study the funding structure of the Campus 
Center, UM/Amherst. 

Chairman Pumphret requested Vice Chancellor Campion to 
assist in formulating the membership of the proposed committee. 

Turning to the Proposed Loan to the Boarding Hall Trust 
Fund, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-148 ) , Chairman Pumphret proposed that, 
since the income and expenditure figures indicated a 387o deficit as 
of June 30, 1972, the Committee recommend the transfer of such funds 
as may be needed, pending receipt of student fees for the academic 
year 1972-73. This being agreeable to Treasurer Johnson and Vice 
Chancellor Campion, on motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize the loan of sufficient funds to the 
Boarding Hall Trust Fund from the Student Housing 
Deposit Account (#06-038630) at 4.5% interest, 
compounded monthly, to liquidate accounts payable 
as of June 30, 1972, subject to repayment on or 
before October 1, 1972. 

Chairman Pumphret noted that the Board must act for the 
professional employees of the University on the 4.37» cost-of-living 
wage increase recently enacted by the state Legislature. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in 
accordance with the provisions of Section 14 of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended, and the 
provisions of Chapter 300 of the Acts of 1972 and 
the authority contained therein and all other 
acts applicable thereto, each officer and member 
of the professional staff of the University of 
Massachusetts employed in a position paid in 
whole or in part from state funds under subsidiary 
accounts designated 01 and 02 shall for the 
period beginning December 26, 1971, have the rate 
of his regular compensation otherwise paid or 
payable on December 25, 1971, increased by an 
amount of four and three- tenths percent but such 
increase shall not be applied to any salary rate 
previously fixed by vote of the Trustees or to 
any salary rate previously fixed under authority 
delegated by the Trustees for any such new 



393? 



Finance Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Amherst- - 
Campus Center Fee 
Doc. T72-152 



UM/Amherst-- 
Proposed Loan to 
the Boarding Hall 
Trust Fund 
Doc. T72-148 



State Employees 

Cost-of-Living 

Increase 



3938 



Finance Comm. 

5-26-72 

State 

Employees 

Cost-of-Living 

Increase 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst- - 

Request for Loan 

for Campus Center 

Garage 

Doc. T72-149 



UM/Amherst- 
WMPIRG Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

professional employee entering the service of the 
University of Massachusetts on or after December 26, 
1971, and that the President of the University is 
hereby authorized to take all actions necessary or 
desirable to implement this Act and to also apply an 
increase not to exceed four and three-tenths percent 
to the regular compensation in the same manner to all 
members of the professional staff and classified 
employees normally paid from other than state funds 
who in his judgment are in categories of employment 
equivalent to the intent and scope of said Chapter 
300, provided, however, that in the case of those 
paid from institute, grant or contract funds the 
recommendation and certification of the availability 
of funds by the cognizant principal investigator 
or director shall be a prerequisite to the payment 
of any such increase. 

Following a brief dialogue between Mr. Pumphret and Vice 
Chancellor Campion regarding the Request for a Loan for the Campus 
Center Garage, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-149 ) , the Committee agreed that 
its recommendation would be to authorize temporary loans, as neces- 
sary, subject to consideration and approval by the President and the 
administration, UM/Amherst. 

It was therefore, moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

take note of the fact that there is a possibility 
of a temporary deficit for the current year's 
operation of the parking garage /Amherst and 
authorize the President with the Amherst Campus 
Administration to utilize available funds or 
make other arrangments to temporarily cover any 
deficits during the period of temporary financing. 

Chancellor Bromery, UM/Amherst, then requested Finance 
Committee approval of the $2.00 voluntary, nonrefundable fee 
included in the proposal to establish the Western Massachusetts 
Public Interest Research Group (WMPIRG) being considered by the 
Trustee Committee on Student Activities. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, sub- 
ject to concurrent action today by the Trustee 
Committee on Student Activities they approve the 
$2.00 voluntary, nonrefundable fee to be charged 
participants in the Western Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group (WMPIRG) at UM/Amherst 
per semester. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The meeting was adjourned at 11:05 a.m. 




Robert EJ McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



3939 



Finance Comm. 
5-26-72 



3940 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst- - 
Traffic Rules and 
Regulations 
Doc. T72-153 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 26, 1972; 10:45 a.m.; Room 804, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Haigis, Trustees 
Chandler, Crowley, Howes, Maginnis, and Pumphret; Treasurer 
Johnson; Secretary McCartney, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the Pres/ident : Vice Presidents Phillips and 
Lashman 

Office of the Secretary : Ms. Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Campion, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Gage 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick; Planning Officer O'Brien 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Haigis convened the meeting at 11:05 a.m. He 
requested Acting Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Gage of the 
UM/Amherst campus to present the first item, Traffic Rules and 
Regulations, UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-153 ) . 



Dr. Gage explained that there wer e no substantive changes 
in the document being presented to the Committee, except for some 
reworking of language and the addition of an appeals procedure 
specifically restricted to offenses related to defacement of traffic 
signs, parking in certain restricted areas, abandoning vehicles in 
parking lots, registration of vehicles, and certain other offenses 
including falsification of registration information, altering decals 
or permits, loaning of a motor vehicle to an individual not eligible 
to operate it, or operation of a vehicle by an ineligible person. 

The document has been approved by the Security Department 
and by the Transportation and Parking Council. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that the rules and regulations would 
only be as good as the enforcement applied to them. Dr. Gage assured 
the Trustees that the recent addition of police officers and the 
approval of the Trustees of campus traffic signs would now clear up 
the enforcement problem. 

After brief, further discussion it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the rules and regulations pertaining to 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the use of motor vehicles on the UM/Amherst campus 
and other lands of the University associated with 
the Amherst campus as detailed in Document T72-153 . 

Chairman Haigis next turned to the item on Conveyance of 
Land and Easements to the Metropolitan District Commission for the 
Morrissey Boulevard Interchange, UM/Boston (Doc. T72-154 ) . 



Chancellor Broderick introduced Planning Officer O'Brien 
who presented the outline of this proposal. Mr. O'Brien reminded 
the Committee that the conveyance had been provided for in the 
enabling legislation for the Columbia Point campus which included 
a provision fo r the future transfer of land to the Metropolitan 
District Commission. Complete working drawings and specifications 
are expected to be completed by MDC in June. In order to proceed 
with construction, the Trustees must now convey the land to them. 

Treasurer Johnson, noting that the plans call for a side- 
walk on the south side of the interchange, queried whether this coulc. 
not be matched by a sidewalk on the north side, so as to minimize 
pedestrian crossings against the vehicular traffic flow. Assurance 
was given that, if such a facility is to be provided, it could be 
constructed by the University. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Inter-agency Agreement between the 
Trustees of the University and the Metropolitan 
District Commission relating to an interchange 
connecting the Columbia Point campus to William 
T. Morrissey Boulevard, as authorized by Chapter 
898 of the Acts and Resolves of 1969, and as detailed 
in Document T72-154. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that William 
R. Hamilton, Jr. , Vice Chancellor of the University 
of Massachusetts, Boston, be, and hereby is, 
authorized to sign, seal with the corporate seal, 
acknowledge and deliver all, on behalf of the Board 
of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, any 
deeds, grants of easements, or other instruments 
that may be necessary or desirable in connection 
with the performance of the Inter-agency Agreement 
entered into between the Trustees of the University 
and the Metropolitan District Commission, relating 
to the Interchange connecting the Columbia Point 
campus to William T. Morrissey Boulevard, which was 
authorized by Chapter 898 of the Acts and Resolves 
of 1969; the signature of said Vice Chancellor shall 
be deemed sufficient compliance with the requirements 
and sufficient evidence of his authority hereunder. 



3941 



B & G Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Traffic Rules and 
Regulations 
Doc. T72-153 

UM/Boston-- 
Conveyance of 
Land and Easements 
to Metropolitan 
District Commis- 
sion for 
Morrissey 
Boulevard Inter- 
change 
Doc. T72-154 



3942 



B & G Comm. 
5-26-72 



UM/Worcester-- 
Renewal of 

. n . COMMITTEE 

Application 

to HEW, Hospital 

Construction Funds 



UM/Worcester — 
Power Plant 
Availability; 
Funds for 
Operation and 
Maintenance 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Haigis next introduced several items under Other 



Business. 



Dean Soutter of the Medical School reported that the act 
under which the University applied for federal funds for the Hospital 
has expired. He has been invited to make a new application. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the filing of a new application with the 
U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare 
for a grant of funds to limit permitted by federal 
law for construction of the University hospital 
at the Medical School, UM/Worcester ; also, that 
Dr. Lamar Soutter, Dean of the University of 
Massachusetts Medical School be, and he hereby is, 
authorized to sign on behalf of the Board of 
Trustees the application to HEW for said funds. 

Dean Soutter reported further that the Medical School power 
plant was to be ready this fall (three or four months early) and that 
funds had been placed in the budget for the purchase of oil and to 
provide for employees needed to run the plant. 

Since that time, the Department of Public Safety has in- 
spected the building and informed the Dean that five rather than 
three men will be required to operate the plant on each shift. An 
increased number of positions must now be requested, together with 
funds to support them. 

Presently, it appears that the Power Plant will be avail- 
able in September, 1972. Alternate courses of action were discussed 
which would keep the plant in a state of readiness, pending its use 
on a full-time basis next year after completion of the Medical 
Science Building. The cost of operating the plant on a regular 
basis is $50,000 a month. One alternative would be to seal off the 
plant until next April at a cost of approximately $100,000 to $150, 00p, 
so that it can run with a minimum of heat. Funds for this purpose 
can be requested in any of several ways: 

a. By filing a supplementary budget request with the 
Governor 

b. By requesting the Bureau of Building Construction, 
through Mr. Poitrast, to release residual funds 
from the construction appropriation 

c. Request the contractor to seal it off 

Treasurer Johnson emphasized that the power plant should be 
put into operation on a pilot basis for several months in advance of 
its final, full-time operation so that the staff could become famil- 



l> 



U 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

iar with it, thus insuring its readiness when the Medical Science 
Building comes on line next year. It was agreed that the problems 
related to this matter would be reported to the Board of Trustees 
at today's meeting. 



Chairman Haigis reported 
with Town Manager Torrey and Selec 
UM/Amherst Director of Planning Li 
will replace North Pleasant Street 
have the Department of Public Work 
this is not possible, by agreement 
sity, the section which falls into 
University, whereas the sections o 
would be taken over by the Town of 



tha he had had lunch yesterday 
tman Nancy Eddy, together with 
ttlefield to discuss the road whict 

The plan, if possible, is to 
s take over the whole route. If 

between the Town and the Univer- 

Hadley would be taken over by the 
f the route lying within Amherst 

Amhe rs t . 



Vice President Phillips reported on some of the reactions 
reaching the President's Office with regard to the current capital 
outlay request. Of the $95.5 million request, $81,000,000 is 
requested for UM/Boston. The Board of Higher Education has taken 
our priority requests and interfiled them prior to moving their 
recommendation on to the Secretary of Education. 

Secretary Cronin's recommendation of $89.8 million for 
the University included all of the Boston items, all Worcester items 
except land acquisition and $8.3 million for UM/Amherst (including 
the renovation of Goodell Library, etc.). Recommendations on the 
rest of the list altered priorities considerably and it is intended 
to raise questions concerning the propriety of Secretary Cronin's 
office superimposing their own judgment over the University's in the 
matter of setting our priorities. 

Mr. Phillips reported some rumors indicating that the 
capital outlay appropriation this year will be extremely meager. 

Finally, Mr. Phillips reported that the President had 
asked Harold Ross, an architect-planner to make an overall review 
of the plans at Columbia Point. This is already underway, and a 
preliminary report may be ready for the meeting in June. 

It was reported that Phase I construction at Deerfield is 
underway, but that the Phase II request in the 1973 budget for the 
College of Agriculture facilities there had been eliminated at the 
state level. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 




Secreta 




cCartney 

Board of Trustee's 



3943 



B & G Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Worcester-- 
Power Plant 
Availability; 
Funds for 
Operation and 
Maintenance 

UM/Amherst- - 
Progress Report- 
North Pleasant 
Street Bypass 



President' s 
Office-- 
Progress Report- 
Capital Outlay 
Request 197 3 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Review of 
Construction 
Plans, Columbia 
Point 



394 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst-- 
Western Massa- 
chusetts Public 
Interest Research 
Group 
Doc. T72-116 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

May 26, 1972; 10:45 a.m.; Room 801, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Trustee Snowden, Abrams, 

Shaler, Ladd, Greenblatt, Troy; President Wood? Assistant 
Secretary Rawn, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman; 
Mr. Searson, Counsel to the University 

Office of the Secretary : Miss Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice Chancellor 
Gage; Messrs. Voci and Apostola, representing WMPIRG; 
Student Counsel Howland; Professor Burke, Faculty Senate 
Representative 



Trustee Snowden, acting Chairman in the absence of Chairman 
Rowland, called the meeting to order at 10:50 a.m. 

The first order of business was the Western Massachusetts 
Public Interest Research Group project proposal (Doc. T72-116 ) , 



involving a revision made necessary by certain recommendations of 
legal counsel. Vice Chancellor Gage made the presentation pointing 
out that, at the present time, it is necessary to make the program 
somewhat more voluntary than conceived under the original proposal. 
Therefore, the Amherst campus recommends and the WMPIRG students 
support the proposal that the WMPIRG fee be placed on the term bill 
in such a way that students be given the option at the time of pay- 
ment of the term bill whether or not to pay the fee. It would be 
treated on the term bill in the same fashion as the optional health 
insurance. 

Chancellor Bromery pointed out that the Finance Committee 
had earlier in the morning reaffirmed its position of April 19, 1972, 
that it would ratify any proposal on the WMPIRG fee made by the 
Student Activities Committee. In line with this Committee's earlier 
approval of the WMPIRG program on April 15, 1972, it was therefore 
moved, seconded, and 

VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 

of the Western Massachusetts Public Interest Research 
Group (WMPIRG) at UM/Amherst and levying of a 
WMPIRG student fee of $2.00 per semester on each 
student's term bill, payment of which may be made 
on a voluntary, but nonrefundable, basis. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next order of business concerned the Picketing Code , 
UM/Amherst (Doc. T72-109 ) , an issue that had been discussed at 
length at the April meeting of this Committee. President Wood 
relayed a message from Chairman Rowland in which she asked that it 
be pointed out that the Committee in April had felt very strongly 
that it did not want to be in the position of being forced to choose 
between two contradictory codes submitted by campus groups. There- 
fore, to clarify the Committee's recommendation from that meeting, 
the campus groups involved are requested to get together and make a 
coordinated recommendation. The Committee's comments in April 
seeming to favor the Student Senate version of the Code should not 
be interpreted as a strong opinion in favor of that version. 

Trustee Shaler reiterated Mrs. Rowland's point stating 
emphatically that the Committee should not be asked to decide between 
the Faculty and Student versions of the Code. 

Dr. Gage and Chancellor Bromery explained the continuing 
differences of opinion. Then, because it was an item which must 
be resolved, they recommended adoption of the Faculty Senate version 
That version included the phrase "other than classroom corridors and 
faculty office corridors" in Section Al (a) of Document T72-109 . 

Trustee Ladd and Professor Burke discussed their inter- 
pretations of the Code. 

Trustee Abrams raised the issue of police being called to 
the campus. He expressed the opinion that they should not have guns 
on campus. However, after further discussion and comments from 
Trustee Ladd, Chancellor Bromery and University Counsel Searson, he 
agreed that such a prohibition would not be necessary. Thereupon, 
it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 
of the policy statement on the Picketing Code at 
UM/Amherst as outlined in Document T72-109 , and 
including the phrase "other than classroom 
corridors and faculty office corridors " Section 
A 1 (a) in conformance with the recommendation 
of the Faculty Senate and the Chancellor, UM/Amherst. 

Trustee Abrams next raised the issue of the admission of 
minority students to the Medical School. He said that he continues 
to feel that not enough minority recruitment is being done at the 
Medical School in order to be sure that qualified blacks and other 
minority students apply. Chancellor Bromery discussed two possible 
approaches to the problem: 

1. On a long-term basis, devote energy to focusing 
minority interest on attending medical school; 

2. On a short-term basis , change the residency 
requirements so that out-of-state students can 
be admitted to the Medical School. 



3945 



Student Activities 
5-26-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
Picketing Code 
Doc. T72-109 



Other Business- 
Admission of 
Minority Students 
to Medical School 



3946 



Student Activities 
5-26-72 

Other Business- 
Admission of 
Minority Students 
to Medical School 

COMMITTEE 



Massachusetts 
Commission Against 
Discrimination 
Day-long Session 
June 2, 1972 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Snowden objected to anything which can be con- 
strued as saying the University should delay action on this problem 
Vice President Edelman stated that, with some hard work, qualified 
black students could be found in Massachusetts for the Medical School 

All agreed that perhaps a committee with an oversight 
function should be formed to concentrate on the issue of the admissio|n 
of black students at the Medical School. Trustee Abrams asked that 
this issue be given very high priority on the agenda of the Student 
Activities Committee at its future meetings. 

Trustee Snowden also announced that Massachusetts Commis- 
sion Against Discrimination is having an all-day session on minority 
student counseling and advising problems on June 2, and she suggested 
that the University would be interested in such a conference. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:25 a.m. 




lobert J 
Secretar 




cCartney 

Board of Trusts 



% 



t 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

May 26, 1972; 11:15 a.m.; Room 801, Campus Center, Amherst, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy; President Wood; Trustees Abrams , Croce, 
Greenblatt, Ladd, Maginnis , Shaler; Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Phillips, Edelman, 
and Lashman; Mr. Searson, Legal Counsel 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gluckstert;; 
Prof. Burke, representing the Faculty Senate; Dean Picha, 
Associate Provost Hoopes; Mr. Apostola, representing the 
Student Senate Academic Affairs Committee 

UM/Boston : Chancellor Broderick, Dean Marshall 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



394? 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 11:30 a.m. The 
first item on the agenda was the proposed Trustee Statement on 
Affirmative Action (Doc . T72-155) . 



1 



Vice President Edelman reported to the Committee that 
this statement supports prompt and full initiative in Affirmative 
Action by the Trustees. The Chairman noted that, by June 30, a 
full and comprehensive report would be forthcoming from each of 
the campuses on this matter. 

The President added that the general statement in Document 
T72-155 would make it official that the Board of Trustees affirms 



the law and principle of affirmative action. 

It was then moved and seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the 
adoption of the proposed Trustee Statement 
on Affirmative Action as set forth in 
Document T72-155 : 

Under applicable federal and state laws and 
regulations, the Trustees have an obligation 
to see that the University's employment and 
other personnel policies and practices adhere 
fully to equal opportunity requirements. 
The Trustees recognize that this obligation 
is one not merely of law, but also of principle. 



Affirmative 
Action- 
Proposed Trustee 
Statement 
Doc. T72-155 



3948 



Coram, on F. 
5-26-72 



& EP 



Affirmative Action 
Proposed Trustee 
Statement 
Doc. T72-155 

COMMITTEE 



Tenure 

Recommendations , 

1972— 

All Campuses 

T72-160 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The obligation extends to all employment with the 
University, from entry- level employment through 
the highest echelons, and includes all faculty and 
staff positions. It requires efforts in good 
faith by the University to comply, and looks toward 
the achievement of results which are the concrete 
proof of those efforts. 

A full plan of affirmative action in hiring will 
include careful identification of areas where 
blacks, other minorities and women are under- 
utilized or underrepresented at the University, 
special activities to recruit qualified personnel 
to remedy such conditions, assurance of equal pay 
for equal work, and promotion and training policies 
which actively encourage upward mobility for under- 
utilized and underrepresented groups. The Univer- 
sity also has a related obligation to take comparable 
action that will ensure full access for students 
to the institution. 

The Trustees intend that this statement be read in 
conjunction with Document T72-126 , their statement 
adopted May 10, 1972, regarding counseling, advis- 
ing and support services. That statement emphasized 
that affirmative action in hiring and admissions are, 
along with counseling and advising, financial aid, 
and educational reform, key elements in creating a 
responsive institution. 

The Trustees further intend that the University be 
fully and promptly in compliance with all applicable 
federal and state laws and regulations relating to 
equal employment opportunity and affirmative action. 
Therefore, the Trustees ask the President to direct 
that the Chancellors and Dean of the Medical School 
submit affirmative action plans to him by June 30, 1972. 

The Committee then considered the next item on the agenda: 
Tenure Recommendations for all three campuses. President Wood made 
the following statement to the Committee: 

"You are being asked today to act on tenure appointments 
for 75 faculty members; 54 at Amherst, 20 at Boston, and one in 
Worcester. These appointments represent a very substantial commit- 
ment and investment for the University. Despite the very late 
arrival of recommendations from the Chancellors — due, no doubt, in 
part to events of the late spring— I have reviewed them as carefully 
as possible with Trustee Troy and Professor Patterson. In the pro- 
cess of this review, we have postponed cases for which this is not 
the decision year (all on the Boston campus) and we have singled out 
two cases which present special problems. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

"The men and women recommended for tenure offer considerab 
individual distinction. You will note in the summary material that 
many of them offer particular strength in teaching. I believe that 
as a group they will contribute to our continued growth in quality. 
I recommend their appointment. 

"So far as the impact of tenure decisions on the overall 
structure and quality of the campuses is concerned, last fall, both 
Chancellor Broderick and Provost Gluckstern alerted their department 
heads to the possibility of a limit on tenured positions. This 
concern was triggered on the Amherst campus by the realization of 
the effect of slowing growth as the campus reaches the 25,000 limit. 
On the Boston campus, due to the college organization, Colleges I 
and II are in a similar situation of "topping off" although the 
campus as a whole will grow substantially. 

"As the per cent of tenured faculty grows — particularly 
in this time of generally reduced faculty mobility--the number of 
new appointments diminishes and the possibility of major program 
shifts and new developments is sharply reduced. 

"The University Senate in Boston appointed an ad hoc com- 
mittee on tenure and their report is just recently in. I intend 
to have before you at the June meeting, recommendations regarding 
general tenure policy that will help make future considerations 
regarding appointment more carefully related to the institutional 
planning process. 

"These recommendations will deal with two issues within 
the context of the general justification for continuation of tenure: 

(1) Procedures and criteria. 

(2) The implications of tenure in academic planning. 

"In general, I would say that the present situation cannot 
adequately reflect University-wide planning, or future campus direc- 
tions. There is a tendency to regard tenure existentially--as an 
isolated judgment on individual merit, divorced from considerations 
of departmental balance and long-range university directions. There 
is a further tendency to regard the assumptions of an era of growth 
as controlling commitments — even as these shape the University for 
several decades under quite different assumptions. 

"To return to this year's recommendations from the campuses 
I note that Amherst turned down 11 candidates and Boston one. None 
of these negative actions, however, at least at the Provost's level 
was related to planning considerations. Provost Gluckstern has done 
some excellent work, however, in developing projections of the 
implications of differing tenure and hiring policies and in encour- 
aging very serious departmental planning. Nonetheless, the tenure 
percentage at Amherst is going up at 2-37o per year for the next few 
years. In Boston, as the summary notes, there are already departments 



F & EP Comm. 
5-26-72 

!.eTenure Statement 
by President Wood 



3949 



3950 

F & EP Comm. 
5-26-72 

Tenure Statement 
by President Wood 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

with 507o and more tenured faculty. 

"The two cases I mentioned to you are both from the Boston 
campus. In the case of Professor Laufer, the tenured members of 
the Chemistry Department voted 2-1 against tenure, but this was 
revised by Dean Marshall and voted positively by the Chancellor's 
committee and the Chancellor. After considerable discussion and 
reflection, and in conformity with accepted practice so far as AAUP 
notification and procedural standards are concerned, I am holding 
this recommendation until next month. 

"The second case involves denial of tenure to Professor 
Eric Robinson of the History Department at Boston. Prof. Robinson 
is one of the most distinguished faculty members from the point of 
view of scholarship on the Boston campus. The department personnel 
committee voted against tenure, largely, as I understand it, on the 
grounds of collegial incompatibility. I am aware of the importance 
of human interaction among peers, but I remain disturbed by the 
potential loss to the campus, so I am therefore holding his case over 
as well. 

"I am informed that there is a possibility of another recom- 
mendation or so from Amherst for June action which will represent a 
final round-up for tenure. I hope it can be done in the context of 
a general policy discussion for which we are now preparing." 

Dean Soutter informed the Committee that he had only one 
recommendation for tenure at this time and he added that there is 
some concern at the Medical School over the issue of tenure for part- 
time faculty at the Worcester campus. The President suggested that 
this subject be an item for discussion at the June meeting of the 
Committee. President Wood noted that the Medical School should, in 
general, be conforming with medical school practices elsewhere. 

Chairman Troy noted that he has been disturbed by the late- 
ness of the tenure recommendations. He suggested that, at the June 
meeting, the Committee should set a date for Trustee receipt of 
tenure recommendations next year. Mr. Troy felt that he and the 
President should meet to discuss critical cases, though he respects 
the President's decision to stay out of specific cases as much as 
possible. 

Trustee Greenblatt inquired about the Chancellor's state- 
ment in the tenure recommendations from the Boston campus (Doc. T72- 
144), regarding the quality of the tenure recommendations. Chan- 



cellor Broderick pointed out that this year he cannot claim that the 
group as a whole is as outstanding as usual. The Chancellor reminded 
the Committee that this was the seventh year of operation for the 
Boston campus. There was a start-up time of 5 or 6 months in which 
Dean Gagnon had to recruit a faculty of about 50 or 60 for which 
this is the tenure year. He added that there are some distinguished 
and outstanding faculty in the recommendations. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood noted that 92 percent of the Chancellor's 
recommendations are positive. He also stated that the Chancellor 
is holding as many as possible over to the next year. The President 
noted that the Committee will have to focus on "how far we go and 
what the standards will be." 

Trustee Greenblatt stated that he appreciated the candor 
of the Chancellor's statement and noted that he had further concern 
in the tenure matter with what proportion of faculty lies in the 
class "forced by history." He said that he wanted us to be more 
careful in the future. 

Chairman Troy stated that this whole issue of tenure 
would be a matter of continuing concern for the University. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 
of tenure recommendations for the Amherst, Boston 
and Worcester campuses as set forth in Document 
T72-160 . 

Chancellor Bromery next presented to the Committee the 
Graduation Lists for the Amherst campus which had previously been 
distributed to the Trustees. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval of 
Undergraduate Degrees — UM/Amherst awarded as of 
May 27, 1972, subject to each person meeting the 
academic and other requirements as may be appro- 
priate, and subject to certification at the 
earliest possible date by the Office of the 
Registrar. (Doc. T72-138 ) 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 

of the Graduate Degrees --UM/Amherst as certified 
by the Graduate School Office. (Doc. T72-141 ) 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval 
of the Graduation List for the Division of 
Continuing Education (Doc. T72-145 ) , UM/Amherst. 

Chancellor Broderick informed the Committee that the date 
for final examinations for the Boston campus and the deadline for 
final grades prevented him from having a complete list of graduates 
for the Boston campus. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 
of the awarding of diplomas to those UM/Boston 
students who will have satisfied, by June 8, 1972, 



3951 



F & EP Comm. 
5-26-72 

Tenure 
Recommendations 



UM/Amherst-- 

UM/Boston-- 

Graduation Lists-- 

1972 

Docs. T72-138 , 

T72-141 , T72-145 , 

and T72-163 



3952 



F & EP Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Amherst-- 
UM/Boston-- 
Graduation Lists- 
1972 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Amherst-- 
Additional M. ' s 
Degree Title in 
Environmental 
Engineering 
Doc. T72-156 



UM/Worces ter — 
Title of Research 
Professor 



UM/Worces ter — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Pappas, 
Professor and 
Chairman of Dept. 
of Orthopedic 
Surgery, Part 
time with Tenure 
at Medical School 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the requirements for the degree and who will 
have been so certified by the Registrar. (Doc. 



T72-163) 



The next item on the agenda was the discussion of the pro- 
posal from the School of Engineering regarding a request for an 

additional Mast er' s Degree Title in Environmental Engineering. Doc 
T72-156 . ' 

Chairman Troy informed the Committee that the School of 
Engineering accepts people without undergraduate engineering degrees 
into the Environmental Engineering Program. Therefore, it is recom- 
mended that two Master's degrees in Environmental Engineering be 
awarded, one for those students who have received an accredited 
undergraduate engineering degree—Master of Science in Environmental 
Engineering; all others, who fulfill the entry requirements of the 
Environmental Engineering Program- -Mas ter of Environmental Engineer- 
ing. Chancellor Bromery informed the Committee that this proposal 
conforms with the Future University Committee Report and will solve 
the problem that is present at this time. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 
of an additional M.'s degree title in Environmental 
Engineering as outlined in Document T72-156 . 

Dean Soutter then asked for the Committee's concurrence 
on a proposal to create the title of Research Professor at the 
Worcester campus. There has been some mention of this title in 
the past, but no formal action has been taken by the Board of 
Trustees. 

Vice President Edelman pointed out that Director of Personnel 
DeNyse has no objection to the use of this title. 

In response to a question from Trustee Greenblatt regarding 
imitation of research only to persons holding this title, Dean 
Soutter said that this was not a restriction. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize the use of the title Research Professor 
at the Medical School, UM/Worcester . 

Dean Soutter then recommended to the Committee the appoint- 
nent of Dr. Arthur M. Pappas as Professor and Chairman of the 
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, part time, with tenure at the Medi- 
cal School. The Dean informed the Committee of some of the outstand- 
.ng achievements of Dr. Pappas in the field of Orthopedics and with 
crippled children. He is also the surgeon of the Bruins and the 
Celtics. President Wood commended the service aspect of Dr. Pappas' 
career. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Greenblatt informed the Committee that Dr. Pappas 
las accepted an appointment at the Department of Mental Health with 
10 charge for services. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
appoint (part time) Dr. Arthur M. Pappas as 
Professor of Orthopedic Surgery and Chairman of 
the Department with tenure at the Medical 
School, UM/Worcester . 

Chairman Troy informed the Committee of the latest situa- 
tion in the Professor Trowill case. He said that the University 
^egal Counsel has drafted a letter to Professor Trowill reaffirming 
the present Trustee policy on sabbatical leave. Professor Trowill 
lad violated that policy by not returning to the University after 
lis sabbatical leave, or, in lieu of that, returning his sabbatical 
Leave salary. 

The Committee next considered the appointment of Professor 
\rnold Levison at UM/Boston. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the appoint- 
ment of Arnold Levison, Professor, University of 
Massachusetts with tenure and Chairman of Depart- 
ment of Philosophy, UM/Boston. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



J 




AaJUj. 

toDert J. /facC'artne^ 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



1953 



F & EP Comm. 
5-26-72 

UM/Worcester — 
Appointment of 
Dr. Pappas, 
Professor and 
Chairman of Dept. 
of Orthopedic 
Surgery, Part 
time with Tenure 
at Medical School 



UM/ Amherst — 
Case of Professor 
Trowill 



UM/Boston — 
Appointment of 
Arnold Levison, 
Professor of 
Philosophy with 
Tenure and 
Chairman of 
Department 



3954 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

June 27, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

'RESENT: Trustee and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustee Ladd, Secretary 
McCartney, Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Kelly 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Prof. 
Patterson 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Associate Provost Woodbury, 
Associate Provost Hoopes, Prof. Ernest Buck, Agriculture, 
Prof. Dale Sheckels, Engineering, Prof. Terence Burke, 
representing Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Dean Marshall, Prof. James Broderick for Prof. 
Weaver, representing the University Senate 

UM/Worcester: Dean Soutter 



l 



UM/Amherst — 
Three-year 
Mandate of Opera- 
tion — University Associate Provost Woodbury. 
Without Walls 
Doc. T72-165 



Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m. The first 
tern on the agenda, A Proposal for a Three-year Mandate of Operation 
or University Without Walls (Doc. T72-165 ) , was presented by 



The University Without Walls Program began a year ago on 
.in experimental basis assisted by HEW, the Ford Foundation, and the 
National Organization of University Without Walls. Dr. Woodbury 
explained that it is a program that allows for nontraditional, 
:ion-four-year resident students to have an opportunity to receive a 
University education at UM/Amherst. Most of the students in the 
urogram are older, have full-time jobs, and work under several fac- 
llty members in planning their academic work. It is a small program 
[50 students now - 30 additional in September) . Enrollment is not 
expected to become much larger, according to Dr. Woodbury. , The pro- 
posal for a three-year mandate of operation was approved by the 
acuity Senate in May without dissent. 

General discussion followed. Chairman Troy queried how 
experience is converted into academic credit; also, whether the facul 
:y has real confidence in the program. Dr. Woodbury explained that 
:his is a difficult concern, one which is constantly being evaluated. 

Chancellor Bromery explained that the reason for proposing 
i three-year mandate was to insure time for an adequate evaluative 



i 



p 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



process. President Wood added that he has a real concern on this 
point. There is a need, he said, to develop evidence regarding 
traditional teaching versus alternative methods. 

Dr. Woodbury replied that the University has a responsibili 
to build the capacity for evaluative research. In this case, there 
are 25 other institutions involved with a University Without Walls 
program. Their experience will help in evaluation of the Amherst 
program. 

A question was raised regarding the cost factor in 
relation to time spent by faculty members on the program. Dr. Wood- 
bury explained that one argument for University Without Walls is 
that no capital outlay problem is involved. In terms of the small 
unit at the Amherst campus, individual faculty members simply take 
part of their time working, advising, and counseling the students. 
It is a bit of a strain, but the faculty involved are interested and 
want to take part in the program. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve a pilot program three-year mandate of 
operation for University Without Walls at the 
Amherst campus according to the guidelines set 
forth in Part II of Document T72-165 . 

The Chairman then called on Prof. Dale Sheckels to present 
the next item, Name Change: Department of Electrical Engineering 
to the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (Doc. 



T72-166) 



Prof. Sheckels gave a brief outline of the history surround-- 
ing this proposal. Four years ago, three additional faculty were 
lired in the area of computer engineering to set up a computer system!! 
engineering proposal. At that time, the faculty considered request- 
ing a name change but decided to postpone it. This past spring, the 
faculty voted unanimously to change the name of the department. 

Prof. Sheckels explained that Electrical Engineering and 
Computer Systems Engineering is concerned with the "hardware." 
Computer Science on the other hand is concerned with application or 
problem solving "software." He reported that the two faculties work 
Ln cooperation with regard to teaching and physical facilities. The 
lame change, according to Prof. Sheckels, merely acknowledges this 
cooperation and will not represent any additional cost to the 
Jniversity. 

Chancellor Bromery reported that the proposed name change 
las been approved by the Department, the Academic Matters Committee, 
the Faculty Senate, and by the Chancellor. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 



3955 



F & EP Comm. 
6-27-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Three-year 
Mandate of 
Operation — 
y University 
Without Walls 
Doc. T72-165 



UM/Amherst — 
Name Change: 
Department of 
Electrical 
Engineering to 
Department of 
Electrical and 
Computer Engineer- 
ing 
Doc. T72-166 



3956 



F & EP Comm. 
6-27-72 



COMMITTEE 

UM/ Amherst — 
Name Change: 
College of 
Agriculture to 
College of Food 
and Natural 
Resources 
Doc. T72-168 



UM/ Amherst — 
Faculty Senate 
Constitutional 
Amendment on 
Membership 
(Doc. T72-170) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve a name change for the Department of 
Electrical Engineering to the Department of 
Electrical and Computer Engineering, UM/Amherst. 

The next item, Name Change: College of Agriculture to 
College of Food and Natural Resources (Doc. T72-168 ) , was presented 



ry Prof. Ernest Buck. He reported that the College of Agriculture 
Ls the oldest college at the University; also, that the present 
lame does not adequately or appropriately define or describe what is 
going on in the College. The College is divided almost equally 
jetween those interested in natural resources and those concerned 
tfith food resources. According to Prof. Buck, the College is so 
diverse that the question of a change in name has been a controversia 
Ltem for the past two years. 

Chancellor Bromery explained that the committee established 
to determine the new name included persons outside the College. This 
committee was also charged with an ongoing study of reorganization 
and evaluation of the College. Dr. Bromery said that the Faculty 
Senate has approved the change in name as recommended. He also 
recommends it. 

Chairman Troy pointed out that the proposed change has 
also been endorsed by the Farm Bureau Federation. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the name change for the College of 
Agriculture to the College of Food and Natural 
Resources, UM/Amherst. 

Chancellor Bromery then presented the item, Faculty Senate , 
Constitutional Amendment Regarding Membership (Doc. T72-170 ) . He 



» 



t 



informed the Committee that this change allows the President of the 
University to be an ex officio member of the Senate with the power 
to vote. Apparently, in the revision of the Faculty Senate Constitu- 
tion, the title of President was inadvertently omitted when the 
title Chancellor was added. 

President Wood stated that he was pleased to support this 
amendment and appreciated the opportunity to join the Faculty Senate 
as a voting member. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the amendment of the Faculty Senate Con- 
stitution, UM/Amherst, Article 4, Section (a) 
to read as follows: 

4. (a) The following officials of the University 
shall be ex officio members of the Senate with 
power to vote: President, Chancellor 



|i 



1 



Athletic Council (Doc. T72-171 ) . He also noted that the appointment 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



The Chancellor then informed the Committee of another Con- 
stitutional Amendment of the Faculty Senate, UM/Amherst Regarding the 



395? 



of a minimum of three alumni from the professional staff does not 
preclude the possibility that an even greater number of alumni may 
fill the professional staff positions in the Council. 

The proposed change in the Council's composition was 
initiated as a result of student concern regarding adequate repre- 
sentation of students on the Council as it has been structured up 
to this time. 

Chairman Troy inquired how the students were to be 
selected to serve on the Council. Trustee Ladd stated that the 
Student Senate was the legitimate governance mechanism on the campus 
for determining student membership on committees. He also stated 
that the student appointments would broadly represent the student 
population. 

Trustee Ladd reported that credit for final approval of 
this change should be given to Chancellor Bromery for resolving 
differences between the Faculty and Student Senates. He stated that 
the campus was greatly appreciative. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve an amendment to the Faculty Senate Con- 
stitution, UM/Amherst, as follows: 

There shall be an Athletic Council charged with 
implementing the "Statement on Athletic Policy 
of the University of Massachusetts" adopted by 
the Board of Trustees on February 14, 1957, and any 
such resolution of the Board of Trustees which 
may be adopted hereafter. All athletic accounts 
shall be open to review by the President of the 
Undergraduate Student Senate or his authorized 
delegate. Meetings of the Council shall be open 
to the campus community, except in extraordinary 
circumstances. The Council shall submit an 
annual report to the Faculty Senate and the Under- 
graduate Student Senate. The report shall include 
a detailed breakdown of all athletic program 
budgets. Its members shall be: 

1. Eight members of the professional staff, at 
least three of whom shall be alumni. Of the 
above, three alumni shall be selected by the 
Associate Alumni for three-year terms. Five 
other professional staff shall be appointed 
in the manner specified in paragraph (h) 
above, one each year for a five-year term; 



F & E Comm. 
6-27-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Faculty Senate 
Constituitonal 
Amendment re 
Athletic Council 
Doc. T72-171 



3958 



F & EP Comm. 
6-27-72 

UM/ Amherst — 
Faculty Senate 
Constitutional 
Amendment re 

COMMITTEE 

Athletic Council 
Doc. T72-171 



UM/Bos ton- 
University 
Sponsorship of 
Publication of 
Works of Miguel 
Angel Asturias 
Doc. T72-172 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at least four shall be from the faculty and one 
from the administration. 

2. The President of the Undergraduate Student Senate 
or his representative. 

3. Six undergraduate students to be chosen for two- 
year terms in a manner determined by the Under- 
graduate Student Senate. 

4. The Director of Athletics, without vote. 

5. The outgoing chairman, if his chairmanship and 
term of Council membership expire simultaneously, 
shall serve ex officio on the Council and its 
Executive Committee for the year following such 
expiration. 

There shall be an Alumni Committee to recommend and 
promote ways of obtaining greater alumni support for 
the University's athletic interests. It shall be 
composed of five members of the Alumni Association 
chosen by the Association in accordance with its 
usual procedures . 

Chairman Troy then called on Dean Marshall to introduce the 
next item, Sponsorship of the Publication of the Works of Miguel 
Angel Asturias , (Doc. T72-172 ) . She informed the Committee that 



UNESCO and the University of Paris are publishing twelve volumes of 
the works of Asturias. Professor Ricardo Nava-Ruiz, Chairman of the 
College I Spanish Department, will edit one of the volumes. The 
University of Massachusetts has been invited to join in sponsoring 
the series. 

Dr. Marshall reported that Asturias was awarded the Nobel 
Prize for literature in 1967 and that he is an impressive national 
literary figure. Although he is a poet and essayist, he is partic- 
ularly well known for his novel. Since 1966 Mr. Asturias has been 
the Guatemalan Ambassador to Paris. Dean Marshall said that this 
was a great honor for the University and requested that the Trustees 
approve University sponsorship. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve University sponsorship of the publication 
of the works of Miguel Angel Asturias. 

Before moving to the next item, tenure recommendations, 
Chairman Troy called on the President to make a few general comments 
on tenure. 



' 



' 



I! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The President reminded the Committee that he had deferred 
action on certain tenure recommendations at the last meeting. Since 
that time, he has discussed at length with various persons the 
particular cases involved. He is now delivering a memorandum to the 
Boston campus relating to the administrative side of these cases. 

Dr. Wood stated that the process of how the President's 
Office should be involved in tenure decisions is a complex one 
requiring extensive study and review. He said that his office has 
done some research into how other presidential offices are involved. 
His own preference is to give heavy weight to departmental recom- 
mendations. The University is now so large that the President feels 
it is impossible for his office to exercise the appropriate expertise 
in particular case decisions. 

The President also stated that he would shortly issue to 
the Trustees a paper on the general subject of tenure. This will 
cover how case recommendations for tenure can be reconciled with 
informing the Trustees of the consequences in terms of program develop- 
ment, resource investment, and manpower flexibility. He hopes that 
his office can work fruitfully with the campuses on these issues. 



In the cases of four UM/Boston faculty members who have 
come up for tenure earlier than their tenure decision year, the 
President has asked Dean Marshall to hold them without prejudice unti 
such time as a general policy statement is agreed upon. 

In the case of Prof. Daniel Laufer, Chemistry, the depart- 
ment vote was split and he was not recommended for tenure. The Dean, 
Provost and Chancellor reversed that decision and recommended that 
tenure be granted. President Wood stated that he is affirming the 
Administration's decision and requesting tenure for Prof. Laufer. 

In the case of Prof. Warren Cherniak, English, there had 
been a clerical error in the early spring. Prof. Cherniak' s name 
was inadvertently omitted from the list of tenure recommendations. 
The President stated that he is also requesting tenure for Prof. 
Cherniak. 

Dean Marshall explained briefly the history of the Laufer 
case. She said that in all the qualifications for tenure, he stands 
very well. She also has done quite a bit of work in researching this 
case and feels strongly that tenure should be granted. 

Chairman Troy stated that his Committee has had quite a few 
cases referred to it regarding negative tenure decisions. These have 
disturbed him. He feels that they should be handled at the depart- 
mental level. The Chairman also expressed concern that something 
should be put in writing to let faculty know where they stand well in 
advance of their tenure-decision year. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

grant tenure to Prof. Warren J. Cherniak, English, 



UM/Boston — 
Tenure 
L Recommendations 



3959 



F & EP Comm. 
6-27-72 

Tenure Policy — 
Comment by 
President Wood 



3960 

F & EP Comm. 
6-27-72 



UM/Worces ter — 
Tenure 

COMMITTEE 

Recommendation — 
Dr. Donald Tipper 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and Prof. Daniel Laufer, Chemistry, both of 
UM/Boston. 

Dean Soutter then presented a Request for Tenure for Dr. 
Donald Tipper, Professor and Chairman of Microbiology , Medical School 



UM/Amherst — 
Six-week Short 
Course for 
Campus Police 
Officers 

UM/Boston — 
Curriculum 
Proposals — 
College of 
Public and 
Community Service 

UM/Worces ter — 
Title for 
Voluntary 
Faculty 



UM/Worces ter. He reported that when the original appointment of 
Dr. Tipper was approved, it had gone through without tenure. The 
Dean stated that all of his faculty chairmen are appointed with 
tenure and that, therefore, Dr. Tipper's appointment should be 
corrected. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve a change in the appointment of Dr. Donald 
R. Tipper, Professor and Chairman - Microbiology, 
Medical School, UM/Worces ter, to grant him tenure 
retroactive to July 1, 1971. 

Chancellor Bromery announced to the Committee that Mr. David 
Johnston, Director of Security at the Amherst campus* and Mr. Alan 
Lawson, Associate Director in Charge of Training and Planning, have 
opened a six-week course for campus police officers from colleges and 
diversities throughout Massachusetts. 

Chairman Troy expressed concern that the Committee should 
receive a report from Dean Strange of the College of Public and Com- 
nunity Service, UM/Boston, regarding his curriculum proposals for the 
ollege. Dean Marshall said that the Committee could expect a pre- 
liminary report at the August meeting. She reminded the Trustees, 
lowever, that next year was the planning year for that College. 

Dean Soutter informed the Committee that the Medical 
School has been having difficulty with its voluntary faculty regard- 
ing use of the word "clinical" in their title. He said that other 
nedical schools state only the name and location of the person in their 
title, e.g. Assistant Professor at (such and such) hospital. Hence- 
forth, the Dean stated, the Medical School will conform to this pro- 
edure. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:15 a.m. 




jert J. 
Secretary 



Cartney 
f the Board ot 




Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



396 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

June 27, 1972; 2:00 p.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire St., Bostcn 

PRESENT: Trustee and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Haigis , President Wood; Trustees Crowley, Knowles , 
and Pumphret; Secretary McCartney, Assistant Secretary Rawn 

Visiting Trustees : Kelly, Ladd 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Phillips, Lashman, 
and Edelman; Mrs. Robinson 

Office of the Secretary : Mr. Voci 

UM/Boston : Vice Chancellor Hamilton, Planning Officer 
O'Brien, Mr. Richard Freeland; Prof. James Broderick for 
Nevin Weaver, University Senate Representative 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Consultants : Harold Roth, William Moore; George Notter and 
James Alexander of Anderson and Notter 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Haigis at 2:05 p.m. 
the first item was a report from Dean Soutter on progress at the 
Medical School. 

Dr. Soutter reported that the Bureau of Building Constructio 
lad advised against seeking extra positions for the UM/Worcester Power 
Plant by direct appeal at this time to the Governor. This approach 
had been discussed by the Trustees at the last full board meeting. In 
£.ny event, it would not be possible to hire such personnel prior to 
Qctober 1. 

The BBC can hold off turning over the Power Plant until 
February, 1973. This will give approximately two months to get the 

acility ready for operation. Dean Soutter plans to go to the Legis- 
lature in January for funds to run the plant; it is also possible to 
ire personnel on -02 funds. The Dean reported that the Medical 
cience Building will come on line in April of 1973. In fact, both 
tjhe Science Building and the Power Plant are well ahead of schedule, 
lootings are already in for the Hospital. Work is not quite completed 
en the Shaw Building. 

The Dean continued that some faculty are moving into the 
Nurse's Home next to the State Hospital. 

With regard to ultimate use of the Shaw Building, the Depart 
njent of Public Safety has indicated that it is not interested; however 
the Public Health Department may move in with a clinic, offices and 



UM/Wor ces ter — 
Progress Report 



3962 

B & G Coram. 
6-27-72 



UM/Wor ces ter — 
Progress Report 



COMMITTEE 

UM/ Amherst — 
Nantucket 
Property Ease- 
ment to the 
Nantucket Gas 
and Electric 
Company 
Doc. T72-174 



Trustee Kelly 
Introduced 

President's 

Comments 

FY 1973 Budget 



H 



A^kt^a^cL- 



UM/Boston — 
Review of 
Schematic Draw- 
ings Phase II 
(a) at Columbia 
Point 
Doc. T72-180 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

nursing services together with the regional blood bank. In this 
event they would pay for the cost of operating the building and the 
money would revert to the Commonwealth. 

Chairman Haigis introduced the first agenda item, 
Nantucket Property — Easement to the Nantucket Gas and Electric 



Company (Doc. T72-174 ) . Mr. Haigis reported that the University at 
Amherst is installing a new underground electric service to the Nan- 
tucket buildings. This will be done under contract. The Nantucket 
Gas and Electric Company is- furnishing and installing the transformer 
An easement will be required for the purpose of entering and cross- 
ing University property for the installation and servicing of this 
transformer and for access to a utility pole from which the service 
will enter University property. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Treasurer* Kenneth W. Johnson, be authorized to 
execute an easement, in a form presented to the 
meeting, from the Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts to the Nantucket Gas and Electric 
Company to install and maintain an electric power 
transformer on University property with right of 
access thereto including access to a utility pole 
serving said transformer. 

President Wood then introduced the new student Trustee 
from UM/Boston, Ellen Kelly. 

The President continued with a brief report. He noted 
with satisfaction that the House had passed the budget, concurring 
with earlier Senate action and maintaining the number of positions 
which the University had requested. The Governor is prepared to sign 
the bill. In general, the budget situation is now much better than 
it had looked in January. It does maintain our student-faculty 
ratio; and it also maintains our essential patterns of growth. The 
impact of the so-called Sawyer^Amendment will be discussed by Vice 
President Phillips at the Executive Committee meeting on June 28. 



Discussion next turned to the second agenda item, Review of 
Schematic Drawings-Phase II (a) at Columbia Point (Doc. T72-180 ) . 



The President recalled that, last December, he had dis- 
cussed with the Buildings and Grounds Committee where we were at 
that time with the construction schedule and capital outlay budget 
request for $81,000,000 for UM/Boston. At that time he expressed the 
desirability of reassuring ourselves of the coincidence of the 
academic planning with the construction schedule. 

When the original Columbia Point Master Plan came into 
existence, the idea of the six colleges and the campus enrollment 
projection were isolated concepts. In the intervening years, howevei 
an entire new series of programmatic concepts has developed and gotten 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

underway. At its retreat at Hyannis in 1970, the Board of Trustees 
set a 25,000 student enrollment ceiling at UM/ Amherst where graduate 
education, incidentally, had risen from 14 to 49 programs. The 
President noted that the entire mix of science and liberal arts 
nationwide has undergone rapid change in the past two or three years. 

Following the review process set in motion last December, 
the President had reported in April that Harold Roth of New Haven 
had agreed to become a consultant and bring a fresh, new look to plai- 
ning at Columbia Point with special regard to the coincidence of 
physical development with academic planning. Mr. Roth is present 
today. The objective of the review aims at making certain that 
design and construction plans fit the projected size of the campus 
at Columbia Point; also, to conduct the review in such a way that the 
momentum of development is maintained along with safeguarding our 
ability to meet the quantitative needs imposed by accepting our burdejn 
of the Commonwealth's higher education load in the years ahead. The 
President's Office continues to face this dilemma along with the 
UM/Boston campus and various other participants. It is the under- 
standing now that the Governor will not present a Capital Outlay 
Program until early next year, except for limited emergency items. 
Even then, it will be presented in relation to a general reform of 
the tax structure. Thus, the University has a few months of time 
in which to evaluate its present course and determine whether any 
alternatives are pertinent or necessary. 

Dr. Wood emphasized that members of the President's Office 
staff conducting a review of the Columbia Point campus during the pasjt 
few weeks have worked closely with members of the Campus Development 
Committee and the Senate Executive Committee at UM/Boston to develop 
a set of new estimates, alternatives and options. Mr. Richard 
Freeland has played a key role in this matter. 

The memo now before this Committee calls for the following 

(a) Approval of the schematic drawings for the 
gymnasium (Building 120). 

(b) Postponement for a month of presentation of 
schematics for Building 030 (College Building) 

(c) Intensive study this summer of Building 080/2 

(second part of the Science Building) . 

Trustee Pumphret suggested that Mr. Troy's Committee on 
Faculty and Educational Policy should be involved in the plans for 
Building 080/2. President Wood agreed. 

General discussion followed on Building 120, the Gymnasium 
It was noted that the position of the Gymnasium faces (at the north- 
west corner) a ramp leading to the Columbia Point Housing development 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton commented that the Gymnasium is 
intended to provide facilities for competitive sports and "passive 
sports", mainly at the intramural level. Thus, no heavy emphasis is 
placed on spectator seats. The building is also intended to provide 



39615 

B & G Comm. 
6-27-72 

UM/Boston — 

Review of 

Schematic 

Drawings Phase II 

(a) at Columbia 

Point 

Doc. T72-180 



UM/Boston — 
Columbia Point 
Building 120— 
Gymnas ium 



3964 

B & G Comm. 
6-27-72 



UM/ Bos ton — 
Columbia Point 
Building 120— 
Gymnas ium 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a large space for convocations, commencement, etc. Finally, the 
building is "a key element between the University and the community. 
In general, Dr. Hamilton said, the Dorchester community is very 
excited about having a hockey rink available for use by "little 
leagues" from time to time. 

Trustee Pumphret, in a series of comments, noted that — 
with a 15,000 student enrollment at Columbia Point and the mandate to 
serve all of eastern Massachusetts — the University will not have much 
scheduling time available for community purposes. Dr. Hamilton 
responded that the intention is to schedule regularly the ice rink 
and the large swimming pool in the gymnasium, but not to share the 
smaller pools in the Colleges. The Community has been asked to 
organize its demands for use. 

Planning Officer O'Brien pointed out that the Gymnasium is 
close to its original budget estimates and is roughly on schedule 
including the presentation today of schematic drawings. There is 
every hope that the building can be put out for contract next spring 
Mr. George Notter of Anderson and Notter was introduced to present 
details of the schematic drawings. 

Mr. Notter stressed that the building consists basically of 
a gymnasium, a skating rink and a swimming pool all on one level. 
This has led to the development of a "central spine concept." 
Internal circulation is minimized; parking space is below the buildinlg 
and entrances to the structure are located on both the community side 
and the campus (interior) side. There is also a "bridge level" 
which could be used seven out of ten days, which level will also 
serve for ingress and egress of spectators. 

Trustee Pumphret raised further questions concerning access 
to the Gymnasium by Savin Hill residents without disturbing the 
Columbia Point community. He stressed his feeling that the plan "is 
headed for trouble" if the northwest entrance calls for ingress 
solely through the Columbia Point residential area. 

Extended discussion followed on the extent of involvement 
which the University at Boston should have with the Columbia Point 
community. President Wood said he did not discount the seriousness 
of anything which Trustee Pumphret had identified, adding that dif- 
ficulties would center principally on the scheduling problem. He 
added, however, that the Gymnasium should be built. Relationships 
with the communities at Fields Corner, Savin Hill, Dorchester, and 
North Dorchester were elaborated upon. The President stressed that 
the Gymnasium must have more than simply an entrance way from the 
center of the campus . 

Vice President Lashman added that Trustee Pumphret' s points 
concerned him deeply. He noted, however, that real progress has been 
made by Vice Chancellor Hamilton's staff in relating to the North 
Dorchester community; also, that the Columbia Point community appears 
to be fragmented today, much as it was when he arrived two years ago. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Edelman stressed that there are, indeed, two 
iccesses to the Gymnasium, both presumably available for the general 
ublic; the interior campus entrance, together with the northwest 
entrance. Finally, it was agreed that further study should be given 
:o the plans for Building 120. Following this, President Wood moved, 
Lt was seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the schematic drawings for Building 120 
(Gymnasium) for UM/Boston at Columbia Point 
within the context of discussion at this meeting, 
and to proceed with working drawings for said 
building. 

The President next reminded the Committee that his memo- 
randum called for Building 030 to be postponed one month to give 
icademic planners an opportunity to examine office-classroom and open 
space. This had been discussed this morning with Chairman Troy of 
:he Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy. Further, the 
JM/Boston recommendation on Building 080/2 is that design be sus- 
pended until an academic program is developed with a target date of 
: larch 1973. 

The President, while acknowledging that the original BHE 
mrollment projections for the University may be too high and that 
reductions in those enrollment projections may be more realistic, 
igreed with the campus recommendation that some review of the plans 
or Building 080/2 is in order. However, because of its importance 
Ln the overall planning for the campus, such review of Building 080/2 
should be done intensively during the next two months with further 
report and recommendations being given to the Board of Trustees in 
September. 

Professor Broderick, representing the UM/Boston University 
Senate, emphasized that Building 080/2 is the keystone of the Univer- 
sity. He agreed with Trustee Pumphret that Chairman Troy's Committee 
should be involved. Further, he thinks that the September timetable 
Ls too brief a period for the involvement of full campus participatioi. 
Ln this major decision. 

Vice Chancellor Hamilton clarified the schedule as follows : 

That a set of options on 080/2 should be brought to 
the faculty in September and also to the Buildings 
and Grounds Committee and to the full Board of Trustees 
in that month. 

'Chis would call for action in October rather than September. The 
'resident was not certain that this was a realistic timetable. He 
issured Professor Broderick, however, that academic involvement in 
he decision would not be excluded. 



On other matters, Chairman Haigis reported briefly as 



ollows : 



3965 

B & G Comm. 
6-27-72 

UM/Boston at 
Columbia Point 
Building 120 
Gymnas ium 



UM/Boston at 
Columbia Point 
Building 080/2 
Science Building 
Section Two 



3966 

B & G Comm. 
6-27-72 

UM/ Amherst — 
Progress Report 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next section of the Graduate Research Center at 
UM/ Amherst came in at $1.9 million below estimates; also the farm 
buildings at Deerfield came in close enough to estimates so that 
ground can be broken at any time. 

The Chairman also reported that a number of buildings on 
the Amherst campus require formal acceptance by the Trustees. The 
Secretary was requested to identify these buildings and provide a 
list to the President's Office and the Chairman of the Committee so 
that action may be taken in the near future. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 



n 




Robert J. 
Secretary 




rCartney 

3oard of Trusted 



I 



396: 



~7 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
August 16, 1972; 1:00 p.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire St., 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Pumphret, President Wood; Trustee Crowley, 
Secretary McCartney; Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, 
Treasurer Johnson 

UM/Boston : Budget Officer Thomas Baxter 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Saunders 

Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. : Mr. John Wood 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 1:00 p.m. He 
requested Mr. John Wood, from Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., to 
comment on the Investment Counsel report, Document T73-002A , which 
was mailed previously to the Committee. 

Mr. Wood explained that one result of mailing reports aheac 
of time is that important price changes may occur due to market 
fluctuations in the interim. Therefore, he recommended a change in 
the proposed Newmont Mining Corporation investment: from 400 shares 
of convertible preferred to an equivalent amount of Newmont Mining 
common stock. (1400 shares for the same amount.) 

A brief explanation followed by Mr. Wood on the reasons 
for the recommendations to sell shares of Addressograph, First 
National City, and Kimberly Clark. 

General discussion followed on the purchase side of the 
report. Mr. Wood stated that the additions to six present holdings 
were quite conventional. He also noted that information describing 
the proposed new investments had been mailed to the Committee. He 
briefly outlined the recommendations calling for new investments in 
Holiday Inns, Newmont Mining, and RCA Corporation. 

In addition to this stock program (involving an additional 
investment of $81,576) the investment counsel is proposing a modest 
bond switch to eliminate a small holding of Aa-rated Public Service 
Electric and Gas bonds and reinvest in a $25,000 lot of a higher 
grade Aa electric utility of roughly the same coupon and maturity. 
This program would involve a net new investment of $92,676 and a net 
addition to income of $4,388. 

After further discussion on these recommendations, it 
was moved, seconded, and 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 

Doc. T73-002A 



3968 

Finance Comm. 
8-16-72 

Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 

Doc. T73-002A 



COMMITTEE 



Bartlett Tree 
Company Stock 
Offer; 

Bartlett Realty 
Company , Incor- 
porated Stock 
Offer 

Docs. T73-002B 
and T73-002C 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute changes in the 
University's investment portfolio as recommended 
by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., as follows: 

Sell : 700 Shares, Addressograph 

600 Shares, First Nat'l City 
1,200 Shares, Kimberly Clark 



Buy : 500 Shares, 

400 Shares, 

200 Shares, 

700 Shares, 

228 Shares, 

300 Shares, 

1,000 Shares, 

1,400 Shares, 

1,100 Shares, 



American Cyanamid 

American Metal Climax 

Bankers Trust 

Champion Int'l $1.20 cv pfd. 

General Electric 

Goodyear Tire 

Holiday Inns 

Newmont Mining 

RCA Corp. 



Sell : 10M Public Service Electric & Gas 4 5/8 8/1/88 

Buy : 25M Better Grade Aa Utility 4 5/8 1988 

The Chairman then called on Treasurer Johnson to present 
the next item, Bartlett Tree Company Stock Offer (Doc. T73-002B ) , 
and the Bartlett Realty Company, Incorporated Stock Offer (Doc. T73- 
002C) . The Treasurer explained that these two items should be 



viewed as a total package. He recommended that the University accept 
the proposed offers as outlined in Documents T73-002B and T73-002C . 
These stocks came as a bequest many years ago. They are not of a 
quality for the University portfolio but have been held because unti] 
now there has been no market for them. According to Mr. Johnson, the 
University has not been receiving dividends on the common stock. Mr. 
Wood, speaking for the Investment Counsel, agreed with Mr. Johnson's 
recommendations . 

Chairman Pumphret stated that he was pleased with the 
recommendation as this problem has been in question for a long time. 

Following discussion, it was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to accept the offer of 
June 14, 1972, made on behalf of Mr. Robert 
Bartlett and to sell six shares of The Bartlett 
Realty Company, Incorporated for $1,000.00 per 
share and to accept the offer of July 5, 1972, 
made on behalf of the Board of Directors of The 
F.A. Bartlett Tree Expert Company and to sell 
288 shares of preferred stock of The F.A. 
Bartlett Tree Expert Company at a price of 
$20.00 per share and 1,000 shares of common 
stock at a price of $110.00 per share, payment 
for the common to be over a five-year period 



B 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at 5% interest as contained in the offer, all as 
recommended by Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc. 

Treasurer Johnson introduced the next item on the agenda, 
Investment Policy for Operating Fund (Doc . T73-003 ) . He reminded 



the Committee that in April, it was voted that the University would 
consider putting more of its surplus money in the operating fund 
into savings banks. After discussion with Investment Counsel in 
view of changing interest rates and at the request of Chairman 
Healey, the Treasurer recommended rescinding this vote, no funds 
having been invested thereunder. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To rescind the vote approved at the April 19, 
1972, meeting of the Finance Committee: 
"To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
they authorize the placement of surplus Univer- 
sity operating funds in savings accounts to be 
selected by the Treasurer of the University 
with the approval of the Chairman of the Board." 

The Treasurer then continued his explanation of the invest- 
ment policy. He informed the Committee that the situation is 
changing in the short-term money. At the -present time the daily 
interest account in the First National Bank of Boston is obtaining 
close to 5% interest, as a result of the process used in compounding 
interest. He recommended that the Committee hold off other operating 
fund investments for another month. There was general consensus 
among the Committee members to delay action. 

Brief discussion followed on the general posture for the 
University in the area of investment. Treasurer Johnson explained 
that after discussions with Investment Counsel, he had done a draft 
of some guidelines for investment of the endowment fund that are 
not yet ready for discussion. 

The Committee then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
the Establishment of a Richard Foley Scholarship Fund (Doc. T73-004 ) 
Treasurer Johnson explained that Richard Foley left in his will 
$5,000 to establish a scholarship fund. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

establish an Endowment Fund/Amherst in accordance 
with the bequest of $5,000 from Professor Richard 
C. Foley to be known as the R.C. Foley Scholarship 
Fund, the income therefrom to be awarded by the 
Scholarship Committee of the College of Agriculture 
to the senior majoring in Veterinary and Animal 
Sciences who ranks academically in the top 20 
percent of departmental seniors on the basis of 



3969 



Finance Comm. 
8-16-72 



Investment Policy 

for Operating 

Fund 

Doc. T73-003 



UM/Amherst — 
Richard C. Foley 
Scholarship Fund 
Doc. T73-004 



3970 

Finance Comm. 
8-16-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Richard C. Foley 
Scholarship Fund 
Doc. T73-004 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Worcester — 
Robert Wood 
Johnson Trust 
Fund 



UM/Amherst — 
Murray D. and 
Anne H. Lincoln 
Endowment Fund 
Doc. T73-019 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

three years work all taken at the University in 
Amherst and who has shown exceptional qualities 
of leadership and high character; this award is 
to be made without regard to the financial need 
of the individual. 

Dean Saunders reported to the Committee that the late Mr. 
Robert Wood Johnson, of the firm of Johnson and Johnson, left a 
substantial amount of money in a foundation which is donating a 
large proportion to the field of health science education. This 
year they will be allocating 10 million dollars ($5 million of which 
will be divided between every four-year medical school in the country) 
The other $5 million will be divided according to a formula established 
by the Foundation; the number of women students, number of minority 
students and the number of students from rural areas, (defined as 
less than 50,000). Around September 1, according to Dean Saunders, 
the University will be receiving approximately $26,000 which must be 
used according to the terms briefly outlined above i He informed the 
Committee that this gift will help the Medical School in their Affirn- 
ative Action Program. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
a trust fund be established on the books of 
the University to be known as the Robert Wood 
Johnson Foundation Trust Fund/Medical School 
for the purpose of receiving and administering 
any gifts to the Medical School by the Robert 
Wood Johnson Foundation. 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the Committee that he would 
ecommend the transferring of all proceeds from the sale of the 

Murray D. Lincoln land given during Mr. Lincoln's lifetime directly 
nto the Murray D. and Anne H. Lincoln Endowment Fund account 

established by the Lincoln Trust (Doc. T73-019 ). 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary 




Cartney 
Board of Trusteed 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
August 22, 1972; 3:00 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Ladd 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg 

UM/Amherst : < Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Glucksterr. 
Director of Personnel DeNyse, Budget Director Gulko 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall 

UM/Worcester : Associate Deans Saunders and Stockwell, 
Controller Cathey 



Chairman Healey called the meeting to order at 3:15 p.m. 

President Wood outlined the general approach to bringing 
the FY 1974 Maintenance Budget Request (Doc. T 7 3- 012) from the three 
campuses and the central office to the Trustees with improved method: 
of setting priorities than was possible before. He stressed that th« 
recommendations on priorities and possible reductions in the budget 
as presented this year do not reflect the need for additional justi- 
fication from the campuses as may have been the case in the past, 
but rather, they simply reflect the strategic position in which the 
University finds itself. 

The President reported that Governor Sargent intends to be 
present at the informal session of the Board on August 29 with 
Secretary Cronin, who will later be reviewing the budget along with 
the Board of Higher Education and the Department of Administration 
and Finance. Dr. Wood noted that the present serious condition of 
state finances with an overall deficit of up to 400 million dollars 
without new taxes has necessitated cuts in campus requests, which 
requests this year represented an increase of approximately 24 
million dollars over present levels. In an effort to preserve 
priority items, the major reductions are proposed in the following 
areas : use of reduced averages in faculty salaries , deferment in 
recruiting schedules and interplay between the capital outlay and 
the maintenance budget. In general, reductions have been made in 
maintenance and equipment at UM/Amherst, contingency funds at 
UM/Boston, and physical plant at UM/Worcester. 



3971 



FY 1974 
Maintenance 
Budget Request 
Doc. T73-012 



3972 

8-22-72 
Exec. Comm. 

FY 1974 
Maintenance 
Budget Request 
Doc. T73-012 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Phillips then summarized the general 
request reduction profile as follows: 



UM/Amherst 

UM/Boston 

UM/Worcester 

Central 
Administration 

Special Approp. 



Requested 
$67,599,342 

19,904,857 

6,215,522 

2,070,122 

$95,789,843 

$ 8,853,443 



Recommended 
$65,451,342 

16,938,357 

5,021,522 

1,623,590 



Reduction 

$2,148,000 (3.2%) 

2,966,500 (14.9%) 

1,194,000 (19.2%) 

446,532 (21.6%) 



$89,034,811 $6,755,032 (7.1%) 

$ 8,222,000 
$97,256,811 



Mr. Phillips verified for Trustee Pumphret that, although 
Document T73-012 will be available for review, the budget and detailed 
supporting material submitted to the Legislature will be that 
approved by the Board of Trustees on August 29. Mr. Pumphret 
stressed that the request must be presented as a firm statement of 
need. 

Continuing his presentation, Vice President Phillips pointed 
out that salaries for new faculty members have been figured at the 
assistant professor rather than at the associate and full professor 
level. However, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern added, it is customary 
to offer at least an assistant professorship to anyone with a 
doctorate. 

Another economy has been effected by deferring the effecti\ 
dates of hiring new appointments several months into the fiscal year, 
especially at UM/Boston and UM/Worcester. It was noted that $1.2 
million in the UM/Amherst operating budget should actually be con- 
sidered as capital outlay since it represents high-priority items 
such as rehabilitating older buildings. This formed a large part of 
the reduction in the UM/Amherst base request. 

Vice President Phillips itemized various areas of reductior 
for UM/Boston, noting that, despite the cuts, the size of the library 
staff was doubled. Trustee Gordon expressed concern that the Columb: 
Point library program be given high priority as this represents "the 
heart of the University." He questioned listing the library requests 
as under special appropriations. 

Reductions at UM/Worcester were effected by deferring posi- 
tions for three months at a $437,000 reduction; also, the 03 account 
request over and above this year's level was eliminated. Some 
support costs were also eliminated for the basic clinical sciences 
building. 

Regarding UM/Worcester, the acceptance of buildings under 
construction will have various effects on the budget. It was noted 
that the overall reduction of seven percent is about double that of 



t 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

last year at this stage in the budget. 

President Wood reiterated his statement on page U-2 of the 
Maintenance Budget Request document: "It is essential that the 
Executive and Legislative branches recognize that an internal review 
process has taken place, and that the requests they receive are in 
fact the minimal levels necessary to carry out the mission of the 
University." 

With reference to financial aid at UM/Boston and particularly 
at the Columbia Point campus, Chairman Healey urged particular atten 
tion to awarding scholarships to applicants from needy families as 
opposed to those who apply because they wish to be independent of 
family ties. It was agreed that a policy should be developed to 
guide the UM/Boston financial aid officer in the area of aid to 
students . 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton was requested to prepare a sur- 
vey report for consideration by the Trustees together with recom- 
mendations for a proposed policy on scholarships and financial aid al: 
UM/Boston. Trustee Gordon cautioned that legal counsel should advise: 
on statements of residency intent indicating what degree of intent 
can be obtained. 

Dr. Hamilton noted that the opening of the Columbia Point 
campus will necessitate that science labs at the present UM/Boston 
space at 100 Arlington Street be converted back to classrooms and 
offices to be used as a "staging area" for conversion. Chairman 
Healey urged attention to an immediate and long-range plan to main- 
tain the downtown facility which might include acquisition of addi- 
tional space. He indicated that this would be consistent with our 
commitment to the City of Boston. 

Trustee Gordon queried whether the Executive Committee 
should go on record that the Board is concerned about a policy for 
aid to disadvantaged students. Dr. Wood suggested that the Committee 
should affirm the budget pending the development of a scholarship 
policy, with particular reference to the Boston campus and its 
emerging plans for physical development and modifications. Vice 
President Phillips observed that there is a distinct difference 
between financial aid to culturally disadvantaged students and 
scholarships to needy students. 

Chairman Healey then turned to Chancellor Bromery, UM/ 
Amherst, who introduced Dr. Warren Gulko, the recently appointed 
Budget Director for that campus. Dr. Bromery stated that his Budget 
Office has submitted an "honest, hard budget." He said that he is ir 
agreement with the reduction of $2,148,000 for the Amherst campus. 
He expressed "slight variation" in where the reductions should be 
made. He then identified four areas of reduction which the campus 
prefers to make: (1) the number of classified and professional 
positions, (2) by making late appointments, (3) the recruitment level), 
and (4) the amount of restoration requested as compensation for the 
Shepard Amendment. President Wood stressed that the campus is free 



3973 

Exec. Comm. 
8-22-72 

FY 1974 
Maintenance 
Budget Request 
Doc. T73-012 



3974 

8-22-72 
Exec. Comm. 

FY 1974 
Maintenance 
Budget Request 
Doc. T73-012 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to set its own priorities on the reductions. Dr. Bromery also urged 
that any policy on financial aid be structured so as not to penalize 
the 98% of students who are honestly qualified. 

Turning to UM/Boston, Acting Chancellor Hamilton stated 
that the issue is not the amount of reduction of his request budget, 
but rather that UM/Boston had experienced reductions from the Gover- 
nor's office and the Legislature in the past, they are now also 
required to accept the President's Office reductions as well. The 
central issue, he said, is how does the Boston campus get an increase 
of six million dollars essential to the opening and running of the 
Columbia Point campus. 

Trustee Pumphret suggested that UM/Boston items represent- 
ing a one-time expenditure (packing, moving, etc.) be identified 
separately to avoid inflating those related to the normal growth of 
the University at Boston. 

Responding to Acting Chancellor Hamilton's concern for the 
future of Columbia Point, Trustee Gordon proposed a strong public 
relations program to convince the Legislature and the public of the 
positive need for expanding UM/Boston. Mr. Pumphret urged placing 
emphasis on the $9 million financial aid program as an investment in 
the future of the Commonwealth. 

Turning to the Medical School, UM/Worcester, President Wood 
referred to the five-year plan recently prepared by Dean Soutter. 
Associate Dean Saunders pointed out the concurrent growth in related 
areas (faculty, staff, etc.) required to reach the goal of 100 
enrollments in the fall of 1975. He stressed the importance of funds 
for the following purposes: (1) to maintain 03 positions in the 
clinical areas, (2) to effectuate the occupancy of new buildings 
becoming available, and (3) to open the hospital. Mr. Stockwell 
noted that, while the present reduction in their request does delay 
some new programs (ile. , audiovisual, etc.), the Medical School bud- 
get will be workable if no further cuts are made by the Governor or 
the Legislature. Dean Soutter will comment personally to the full 
Board on August 29. 

Replying to Trustee Troy, Dr. Saunders stated that the 
Medical School anticipates continued use of 03 funds for faculty posi 
tions filled by doctors affiliated with hospitals in the Worcester 
area. He noted that an accreditation committee report soon to be 
distributed to the Board will include the comment that recruitment 
of clinical faculty is lagging. 

Discussion then returned to the serious effect of budget 
cuts on the opening of the Columbia Point campus. Treasurer Johnson 
suggested that an outside opinion on staffing might be helpful as 
justification. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, anc 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To accept the recommendations of President Wood on 
the University's Fiscal Year 1974 Maintenance Bud- 
get Request and to approve as a ceiling figure the 
amount of $97,256,811 which will continue to be 
subject to refinement and reduction by the Presi- 
dent in consultation with the Chancellor, Acting 
Chancellor, and Dean of the Medical School, and 
subject to the comment of the Dean of the Medical 
School to adjustments made subsequent to his 
review. 

President Wood then presented for consideration a request 
for FY 1973 funds available for critical needs pursuant to the 
Shepard Amendments as submitted by the campuses and in the Special 
Account. Vice President Phillips reviewed the material given to 
the Committee (Doc. T73-014 ) and requested authority to proceed. 
It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize submission of a request to the Secretary 
for Educational Affairs for $698,077 from the 
reserve fund established under sections 2B and 2C 
of the FY 1973 Appropriation Act. These funds are 
required for the operation of the University of 
Massachusetts for FY 1973 and are to be incorpor- 
ated into the University's Operating Budget. 

Dr. Wood commented on the events leading to a request for 
an opinion by the Attorney General regarding lease of new office 
space for the President and his staff. This has now been received 
and gives the University wideranging authority in the conduct of its 
business (Doc. T73-015 ) . The space to be leased is located at One 
Washington Mall, Boston, and will relieve the present cramped condi- 
tion in the facilities presently occupied at 85 Devonshire Street. 



After brief, further discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Vice 
President Franklyn W. Phillips be and he hereby 
is authorized on behalf of the Board of Trustees 
to enter into a lease for the Office of the Presi- 
dent to be located at One Washington Mall, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Dr. Wood mentioned several issues raised by Trustee Troy 
regarding the vote taken by the Board on June 28 granting Chancellor 
Bromery authority to waive tuition for up to 400 undergraduate 
residence hall counselors or their equivalent. An opinion has been 
requested from University Counsel Searson as this, in effect, creates 
400 scholarships. Chancellor Bromery indicated that the bills may 
already have been mailed allowing this credit. A further report 
will be made to the Trustees next week. 



3975 

Exec. Comm. 
8-22-72 

FY 1974 
Maintenance 
Budget Request 
Doc. T73-012 



FY 1973 Budget 
Reserve Fund 
Request 
Doc. T73-014 



Relocation of 
Office of 
President 
Doc. T73-015 



UM/ Amherst — 
Tuition Waiver 
for Residence 
Hall Counselors 



3976 

Exec. Comm. 
8-22-72 

UM/Boston — 
Contract with 
Department of 
Mental Health 
Doc. T73-016 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Finally, the President requested consideration of a proposejd 
contract with the Department of Mental Health (Doc. T73-016 ) . Acting 
Chancellor Hamilton stated that this provides financial support for a 
program already in operation at the Student Problem Center, UM/Boston 
On motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize Acting Chancellor Hamiltion to enter 
into an agreement as outlined in Doc. T73-016 
between the University of Massachusetts, UM/Boston, 
for and in behalf of the Division of Health Services, 
Student Problem Center, and the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, Department of Mental Health, for 
and in behalf of the Division of Drug Rehabilitation. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:10 p.m. 



r. 





Robert J. /McCartney 
SecretaryL/Board of Trusl 




L 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
August 29, 1972; 11:00 a.m.; Parlor D. Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Abrams, Ladd, 
Shaler; Secretary McCartney, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs Gluckstern; Dean Edds; Budget Director 
Gulko; Prof. Burke, representing Faculty Senate; Mr. 
O'Donoghue and Ms. Barden, representing Student Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall; Prof. Weaver, representing University 
Senate 

UM/Worcester: Dean Soutter 



The meeting was convened at 11:05 a.m. by Chairman Troy. 

The Chairman invited Provost Gluckstern to present the 
first agenda item, Tenure Recommendation — Sidney B. Simon (Doc. T73 - 

008). ' ' ~ " " ' ' " ~~ 



Dr. Gluckstern reported that the Simon tenure case had beeh 
deferred from action last spring due to involvement of the School of 
Education with certain problems related to governance procedures. 
The appointment has the endorsement of the Personnel Committee of th 
School of Education and the Dean. 

Dr. Simon is nationally known for his work in value clari- 
fication; he also has certain outside commitments beyond the Univer- 
sity. However, Dr. Gluckstern certifies that he carries a full 
teaching load and spends as much time as other faculty members do 
on the campus, within the framework which permits up to one full 
day per week for outside consulting service. 



After brief, further discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
grant tenure to Professor Sidney B. Simon of the 
School of Education. 

The Chairman next called upon Dr. M. V. Edds, Jr., Dean of 
the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, UM/Amherst, to pre- 
sent the second agenda item, Offer to Victor Klee for Appointment as 
Head of the Mathematics Department (Doc. T73-009 ) . 

Dean Edds said that the 75-member Department of Mathematic 
had needed for some time to have outstanding leadership. A committed 
under the chairmanship of Marshall Stone has been seeking such a 



397? 



UM/Amherst — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendation — Sidney 
B. Simon 
Doc. T73-008 



UM/Amherst — 
Offer of Appoint- 
ment to Victor 
Klee as Head of 
Mathematics 
Department 
Doc. T73-009 



3978 

F & EP Comm. 
8-29-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Offer of Appoint 
ment to Victor 
Klee as Head of 
Mathematics 
Department 

COMMITTEE 

Doc. T73-009 



UM/Boston — 
Appointment, 
Bernard M. 
Kramer , 
Professor of 
Psychology with 
Tenure and Head 
of Department 
Doc. T73-011 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

person, and now brings forward the name of Victor Klee. 

Dean Edds terms Klee an outstanding candidate who has gained 
strong external endorsement. He is President of the Mathematical 
Association of America, and has been approached by several univer- 
sities for the chairmanship of the mathematics department and has 
turned them down. 

In response to query from Trustee Shaler, Dean Edds con- 
ceded that he was not certain that Dr. Klee would accept the Univer- 
sity's offer, but added that Marshall Stone now feels that Dr. Klee 
is at a point where he will accept a chairmanship. Provost Gluck- 
stern noted that the item is being brought to the Trustees because 
it represents an overscale appointment. Chancellor Bromery endorsed 
the choice. President Wood indicated that the file on Dr. Klee was 
one of complete distinction. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve an offer to Professor Victor Klee to 
become Birkhoff Professor of Mathematics with 
tenure, and Head of the Department of Mathematics, 
both effective September 1, 1973, at a salary 
of $35,000 for the academic year. 

Chairman Troy next turned to consideration of three 
appointments with tenure at UM/Boston. 

The first recommendation considered was that of Bernard M. 
Kramer of Tufts University Medical School to be appointed as full 
professor with tenure and Chairman of the Department of Psychology, 
College II (Doc. T73-011 ) . 

Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall reported that Dr. Kramer 
had been found after an extremely careful search. He holds the Ph.D 
degree from Harvard, and has been Associate Professor of Preventive 
Medicine at Tufts University. He is a social psychologist, has been 
a consultant and is recommended by extraordinarily distinguished 
persons. Dr. Marshall indicated that Dr. Kramer is innovative, a 
successful teacher, and is interested in the psychology of education 
as well as a variety of interdisciplinary fields. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Dr. 
Bernard M. Kramer be appointed at UM/Boston as 
full professor with tenure and Chairman of the 
Department of Psychology, College II, effective 
September 1, 1972. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall next presented a recom- 
mendation that Professor Robert Kastenbaum be appointed as full 
professor with tenure and Chairman of the Department of Psychology, 
College I (Doc. T73-018 ) . 

Dr. Kastenbaum has been highly recommended. He is the 
product of California who received his Ph.D. from the University of 
South California in 1954. Most recently, he has been a full pro- 
fessor at Wayne State University. He is "a strong developer of 
departments," widely known, and strongly endorsed by members of the 
department in College I at UM/Boston. Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
mentioned that Dr. Kastenbaum would bring with him a Journal which 
is budgeted. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
appoint Professor Robert Kastenbaum as full pro- 
fessor with tenure and Chairman of the Depart- 
ment of Psychology, College I, effective September 1, 
1972. 

Discussion turned next to the third UM/Boston case, 
Appointment with Tenure as Full Professor of Philosophy and Chairman 



of the Department, of Robert Swartz (Doc. T73-010 ). 

Dr. Marshall indicated that Professor Swartz is now at 
Brown University where he is Associate Professor. Last year he was a 
visiting professor at UM/Boston and performed in a very innovative 
way. He had his degree training at Harvard University, has taught at: 
Illinois before going to Brown and focuses his main interests in the 
Theory of Knowledge, Perception, and Philosophy of Mind. He is a 
good scholar with strong publications. Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
emphasized his concern that the Department of Philosophy continue to 
show balance between technical philosophers and the historical ap- 
proach to philosophy. He is now satisfied that it does. In response 
to query from the Chairman, however, he did concede that — at the 
moment — the Department does not contain a classical philosopher. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Teas tees that 

they approve the appointment of Robert Swartz 
as full professor with tenure and Chairman, 
Department of Philosophy, College I, effective 
January 25, 1973. 

Trustee Abrams remarked that a report was requested at a 
recent meeting of this Committee updating progress on recruitment of 
black students at the Medical School. Noting that a program is bein£ 
organized with CCEBS, he wonders whether that has been implemented. 
Trustee Troy requested Secretary McCartney to include this item on 
the next agenda for the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy 
He speculated on ,how this topic might be approached. 



3979 



F & EP Comm. 
8-29-72 

UM/Boston — 
Appointment, 
Robert Kasten- 
baum, Full 
Professor with 
Tenure , Chairman 
of Psychology 
Department, 
College I 
Doc. T73-018 



UM/Boston — 
Appointment, 
Dr. Robert 
Swartz, Full 
Professor with 
Tenure, Chairman 
Department of 
Philosophy 
Doc. T73-010 



3980 

F & EP Comm. 
8-29-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood suggested two approaches: (1) we have Affir 
mative Action sponsors on the three campuses; (2) the Committee might 
review their progress. Also, the Johnson Foundation has made grants 
to medical schools throughout the United States including our own 
specifically to provide fellowships and special funding to facilitate 
the admission of minority students. The first grant has already been 
made to the UM/Medical School. 

Chairman Troy reminded the Committee that a question was 
raised by someone at the May meeting about bringing in minority stu- 
dents from out of state. He expressed concern that this procedure 
might raise serious questions in a beginning medical school that is 
so expensive and where the general sentiment in the state would call 
for accepting first those students who qualify from within the Common- 
wealth. In exploring the problem of minority student admission at 
the Medical School, Mr. Troy hoped that this matter would be taken 
very seriously. 

Trustee Abrams added that the Study Group should think abou|t 
what is happening to freshmen and not simply recommend the admission 
of seniors. He called for minority student involvement in the full 
range of the University program — an approach which, to date, has been 
successful at the undergraduate level. 

Chairman Troy queried how the Affirmative Action programs 
on each of the campuses and in the President's Office were funded. 
Dr. Wood responded that the item is included in our budget, and is 
being presented in our new budget today. 

For UM/Boston, Acting Chancellor Hamilton reported that an 
Affirmative Action program will be presented to the University Assem- 
bly at the earliest possible date. So far, the Plan has not been 
reviewed at UM/Boston by any governance body. 

On another topic, Chairman Troy observed that when the bud- 
gets are presented, he would appreciate having those items dealing 
with new programs highlighted on the first page. The President pointed 
out that highlights are contained in the summary statements by the 
Chancellors and the Dean of the Medical School, along with his summary 
comments . 

Chancellor Bromery observed, with regard to the Affirmative 
Action program that its intent and spirit can be accomplished by the 
hiring of replacements for vacant positions, as well as by new hiring 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:35 a.m. 




UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

August 29, 1972; 11:30 a.m.; Parlor D, Statler Hilton Hotel, Boston 



PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland, President Wood; Trustees Abrams, Croce, 
Ladd, Shaler, Troy; Secretary McCartney, Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Kelly 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn, Ms. 
Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Acting Vice Chancellor 
Gage; Mr. Burke, representing Faculty Senate; Budget 
Director Gulko; Mr. O'Donoghue and Ms. Barden, representing 
Student Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall, Acting Assistant Provost McDonald; Mr. 
Weaver, representing University Senate 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Rowland at 11:40 a.m. 
President Wood reviewed briefly the items to be considered by the 
Committee. 

Chancellor Bromery, UM/Amherst, presented the item, Minor 
Change in Trustee Policy Regarding Expenditure of Student Activities 



Funds on Off-campus Activities (Doc. T73-007 ) . This comes as the 
recommendation of a Summer, 1971 Study Group which felt the August 10 
1970, vote was "internally inconsistent." Dr. Bromery, while indi- 
cating some ambivalence about the words "purposes of the University,' 
stated that the proposed policy gives the President's Office and the 
campus administration more flexibility. President Wood noted that 
the 1970 vote banned financial support for all off-campus activities, 
although it was directed primarily toward political, as opposed to 
educational, activities. In the meantime, a number of off -campus 
programs have evolved (UWW, student field trips, etc.), which could 
legitimately be supported. Rather than request a completely open 
policy, on Treasurer Johnson's advice, the words "purposes of the 
University" were included to avoid too wide an interpretation. 
Specific decisions will be made by the Chancellors or Dean of the 
Medical School, with ambiguous cases being referred to the President 
Trustee Ladd remarked that there have been opposing interpretations 
of the 1970 vote and added that the Student Senate's decisions on 
specific off-campus financial support may well be more restrictive 
than the policy being proposed today. Acting Chancellor Hamilton, 
UM/Boston, indicated his support. 



398 



UM/Amherst — 
Off- campus Use 
Student Activi 
, Funds 
Doc. T73-007 



of 
ties 



8-29-72 



398' 



> 



UM/ Amherst — 

Off-campus Use of 

Student Activities 

Funds 

Doc. T73-007 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
UM/Boston — 
Code of Student 
Conduct 
Docs. T73-005 
amd T7 3-006 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
rescind the vote of August 10, 1970 (Board of 
Trustees, permanent Record Book, page 3399), 
which reads as follows : 

"That it is hereby declared to be the policy 
of the Board of Trustees that funds for stu- 
dent activities collected by charges authorized 
by the Board of Trustees be expended for the 
support of activities on or closely related 
to the campus for which the charge is made 
and that no such funds (a) be applied to 
donations of any kind to individuals , groups , 
or organizations for activities off such 
campus, or for the support of programs con- 
ducted off such campus or (b) be applied to 
support the candidacy of individuals seeking 
public office." 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
adopt the policy that funds for student activ- 
ities collected by charges authorized by the 
Board of Trustees be expended for the support 
of on-campus or off-campus activities, which 
are related to the purposes of the University 
and the campus for which the charge is made. 
No such funds can be applied to support the 
candidacy of individuals seeking public office. 



The Committee then turned to the agenda items concerning 
Approval of Codes of Student Conduct, UM/ Amherst (Doc. T73-005 ) and 



UM/Boston (Doc. T73-006 ). In retrospect, Dr. Wood stated that Summer 



r 



Study Groups in 1971 had reviewed a number of emerging issues, among 
which were tenure and Codes of Student Conduct, and had recommended 
that the Board approve the Codes annually. Henceforth, this will be 
an annual agenda item in April, however, interim approval of the pre- 
sent 1972-73 Codes is necessary. 

Assistant Secretary Rawn observed that the Codes are similar 
for the two campuses, but the UM/ Amherst one reflects more extensive 
experience with problem areas. Acting Chancellor Hamilton reported 
that the UM/Boston Code remains the same as for the past two years 
and was approved by all governance bodies on that campus. President 
Wood stated that he does not expect the Codes to be uniform for each 
campus . 

Trustee Ladd informed the Committee that the student govern 
ment at UM/Amherst expects to submit a totally revised Code in the 
Spring of 1973. He added that, although the Board has the responsi- 
bility for procedural guarantees via a University-wide Bill of Rights 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he feels that the handling of specific offenses should remain the 
responsibility of each individual campus. Chairman Rowland stressed 
that approval of the present Codes is strictly an interim measure 
pending reports to the Committee from the campuses early in 1973. 



On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Code of Student Conduct, UM/ Amherst, 
as set forth in Doc. T73-005 , and the Code of 
Student Conduct, UM/Boston, as set forth in 
Doc. T73-006 , for the academic year 1972-73 only. 

Replying to a question about the summer study groups from 
Trustee Abrams, Dr. Wood explained that he had appointed these groups 
on the Amherst and Boston campuses in 1970 to review areas in the 
"twilight zone of the University structure" and to recommend policies 
to the President and the Trustees within the constraints of governancs 
and other requirements. Membership included faculty, students, and a 
legal counsel. Reports have been reviewed by the individual campus's 
governing bodies. Dr. Wood may adopt a recent suggestion that nomi- 
nations for membership on the study groups be sought from the gover- 
nance bodies on each campus. He also mentioned the Committee on 
Governance originally proposed by the Faculty Senate, UM/ Amherst, 
which will be bringing a report to the Board this fall. 

Trustee Abrams requested Secretary McCartney to distribute 
to the Trustees reprints of the June 1971 Carnegie Commission report 
of a study of governing boards of multicampus universities as being 
very pertinent to the present problems faced by the Board. 

Chairman Rowland reviewed some of the suggestions already 
returned to Secretary McCartney from several Trustees proposing sub- 
jects needing study on any or all campuses by the Committee. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton reported that a reorganization 
of the UM/Boston student activities area will soon be under study 
there. Mrs. Rowland proposed this subject for an October meeting and 
instructed the Secretary to provide the Committee in advance with 
pertinent information. Dr. Hamilton then introduced Walter McDonald, 
soon to be named Acting Assistant Provost for Student Affairs, in 
charge of financial aid, admissions, special admissions, and two- 
college programs under the interim reassignments pending the 
reorganization . 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 




lobert 
Secreta 




cCartney /7 
Board of Trustees 



o— {.y— 1 1. 



3983 



UM/Amherst — 
UM/Boston — 
Code of Student 
Conduct 
Docs. T73-005 
and T73-006 



Summer Study 
Groups 



Carnegie 

Commission Report 
1971 



3984 

9-22-72 



COMMITTEE 



Tenure Policy 
Doc. T73-028 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
September 22, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; Office of the President, Boston, Mass 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Troy, President Wood; Trustees Boyden, Kelly, Ladd 
Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Ms. 
Robinson 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn, Ms. Pug'i 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, Associate Provost 
Bischoff; Prof. Allen, Dean, Humanities and Fine Arts, 
College of Arts and Sciences; Prof. Randall, Head, Recre- 
ation; Prof. Thelwell, Head, Afro-American Studies; Prof. 
Lawall, Classics; Profs. Wellman and Burroughs, representing 
Faculty Senate; Prof. Short, former Chairman, Academic 
Matters Committee, Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall; Prof. Lyons, representing University Senat^ 

The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 10:00 a.m. 

The Chairman introduced the agenda item Tenure Policy , 
referring to the need for careful review and redefinition by the Com- 
mittee. After further consideration by the campuses, a policy state- 
ment will be presented to the full Board by the Committee and the 
President. 

President Wood reviewed the history of campus and adminis- 
trative concern with the tenure policy issue over the past year which 
included comments and statements from the Amherst and Boston campuses 
and his office prior to the development of the most recent position 
papers on tenure. He stressed that this subject directly affects 
faculty recruitment and morale and the future development of the 
University. 

The President said that he had requested Ms. Robinson to 
analyze the tenure options and alternatives and prepare the memoran- 
dum and background material which was mailed to the Committee for 
review (Doc. T73-028 ) . A draft statement was also distributed today 
which is not inconsistent with the 1964 statement, but which is more 
appropriate to the situation in 1972 (Doc. T73-038 ) . Dr. Wood pro- 
posed discussion of the policy at the next Board meeting in conjunc- 
tion with the report of this meeting; but suggested deferment of a 
vote to permit full consideration before final action. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Ms. Robinson reviewed the draft statement, noting the 
relationship of the several parts to the recommendations in the back- 
ground memorandum. The introduction indicates the Trustees' concern 
about the proportion of tenured and senior faculty and expresses 
general support for the system of academic tenure. She noted that 
the statement does make provision for individual units of the Univer- 
sity — for example, College III, UM/Boston, and the School of Educatiofi 
UM/Amherst — to propose alternatives to tenure. Reviewing the enu- 
merated points in the statement, she said that (1) emphasizes the 
need for increasing selectivity and care in making tenure appointment 

(2) tips the scale on criteria somewhat in the direction of distinc- 
tion in teaching and service to the University and the Commonwealth, 

(3) and (4) place the Board's review of tenure recommendations in the 
context of long-range planning by department, school, and campus, (5) 
acknowledges the need for clear appeal procedures, and (6) initiates 
an effort to define the role of the Board in the tenure review pro- 
cess. Under the final section on directions from the Board to the 
Administration, item (3) originated with recommendation both from the 
Deans and in the report of the UM/Boston ad hoc committee on tenure 
policy (the Katz Report). 

Replying to a question from Trustee Boyden, Chairman Troy 
stressed the importance of a tenure policy which protects the secu- 
rity of the faculty as well as the academic standing of the students. 
President Wood added that, in dealing with tenure cases, the Trustees 
should not be placed in the position of making academic judgments or 
of making tenure decisions without a clear sense of their cumulative 
effect on the University's program. The proposed policy would place 
responsibility for individual decisions more clearly at the campus 
level while providing a planning framework which the Board could 
review and effect. 

Trustee Ladd declared that students have a "high stake" in 
any tenure policy as related to the quality of the faculty. He was 
assured by Chairman Troy and President Wood that the student body at 
both UM/Amherst and UM/Boston, through Vice Chancellor Gluckstern and 
Acting Chancellor Hamilton, would have an opportunity to review and 
comment on the proposed policy before final action by the Board. Mr. 
Ladd urged the Trustees to guarantee a student voice in the adminis- 
tration of the personnel policies at the campus level. Vice Chan- 
cellor Gluckstern noted that some departments at UM/Amherst already 
have students on their Personnel Committees. 

Professor Wellman stated that the Faculty Senate, UM/Amherst 
is asking each department for its policy on student participation in 
personnel reviews and will have a report in a few weeks. Trustee 
Ladd emphasized that the "statistics will be very revealing" and 
again urged provision in the policy for student participation. Chair 
man Troy commented that the Trustees would have to be convinced that 
this is advisable. Professor Burroughs assured Mr. Ladd that, in his 
experience, the Personnel Committees are very sensitive to student 
opinion and that the students on the Amherst campus have been instru- 
mental in areas of teacher evaluation. President Wood commented that 



3985 



9-22-72 

Comm. on F & EP 

Tenure Policy 
Doc. T73-028 



3986 



F & EP Comm. 
9-22-72 

Tenure Policy 
Doc. T72-028 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

there is some question as to whether the evaluation of present or 
past students should be solicited. Studies have shown statistically 
reliable differences in results from evaluations by University se- 
niors and again three years later as alumni. He asked Trustee Ladd 
to submit a formal proposition himself or from the Student Senate. 
Dr. Wood also referred to item (2) of the direction section of the 
draft statement regarding teaching evaluation which "should be 
addressed to the role of the student." Mr. Ladd cited a paper adoptejd 
by the Student Senate in June 1972 (previously mailed to the Board) 
relating to student participation in academic policy questions. 



Trustee Kelly stated that the Katz Report on a tenure 
policy has been widely discussed in the University Senate at UM/ 
Boston and that students there participate in tenure decisions. She 
did not feel that students should serve on Tenure and Grievance Com- 
mittees. All departments, however, will eventually have Student 
Advisory Committees. Mr. Troy commented that the unified Senate 
arrangement keeps faculty and students simultaneously informed. Act- 
ing Chancellor Hamilton said that the Katz Report represents a major 
tenure plan. 

Dr. Hamilton then introduced Professor Richard Lyons, the 
newly elected faculty representative of the University Senate. 

Trustee Ladd questioned how criteria for evaluating tenure 
will be developed. Dr. Wood replied that these will be forthcoming 
as specifics develop from the campuses following agreement on the 
policy statement. The President expressed concern regarding (1) the 
adequacy of established criteria for scholarship, especially since 
the innovation of copiers which simplify multiple distribution of 
articles before publication; (2) details of teaching evaluation; and 
(3) definitions of "service." He feels that the best judgments can 
be made at the department level but that explicit guidelines should 
be provided. Chairman Troy urged sharp faculty scrutiny of areas 
classified as "service" as opposed to those related to teaching and 
scholarship. President Wood said that a statement at the recent 
Deans' retreat by Dr. Tagliacozzo, College I, UM/Boston, very 
effectively defined this area. Dr. Gluckstern agreed that service 
does not equate with teaching but noted that service outside the 
campus, sometimes referred to as outreach, can be an equally valuable 
form of scholarly activity. Discussions are underway at UM/Amherst 
regarding what forms of service or outreach should be encouraged, and 
how these services should be evaluated. 

Trustee Ladd then questioned whether there had been any 
study of the effect of tenure on affirmative action. Ms. Robinson 
referred to a study paper prepared by Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
which projected the number of faculty to be recruited each year 
according to alternative policies on tenure and promotion. These 
projections show traumatic changes according to the assumptions on 
policy and this clearly affects the number of openings which would 
be available to women and minority-race applicants. She will pro- 
vide Mr. Ladd with a copy of this report. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I! 



asis 
is 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Continuing, Trustee Ladd asked what alternatives to tenure 
lad been considered; e.g., seven-year reappointment, etc. President 
/tfood replied that 19 alternatives have been presented by Dean Strange 
College III, UM/Boston. These will be explored; however, none can be 
universally applied. He noted that the early retirement option is of 
particular concern to the Deans . 

Professor Lyons pointed out that, if the policy statement 
neans increasing selectivity in tenure awards, this should be made 
clear. President Wood stated that, although the Board and the central 
administration are not mandating a tenure quota system, the change 
from expansion to nonexpansion of campuses will automatically bring 
increasing pressure restricting award of tenure. 

Dr. Lyons stressed the very real problems in morale gener- 
ated when nontenured faculty members compare their records with those 
sf previously tenured faculty. The situation becomes further com- 
plicated when it is necessary to hire new faculty who know they will 
not be able to get tenure. Such faculty may well have a different 
attitude toward teaching performance and University service. Dr. 
31uckstern pointed out that this situation can also stimulate perfor- 
nance aimed at establishing a record for future professional activity 
Chairman Troy added that some institutions operate with a continuous 
three-year turnover. Referring to the faculty member's current emph 
on research and publication to establish national credibility with hi 
peers, President Wood stressed that the faculty must be made aware 
that the criteria employed in tenure review will increasingly emphasi 
teaching and service within the University. 

Professor Wellman, UM/Amherst, comparing a preliminary 
report from a Faculty Senate Personnel Policies Committee subcommittee 
studying tenure, reported overall general agreement with the policy 
paper prepared for the Trustees, with the Senate version possibly 
jeing more stringent. 

Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall, UM/Boston, reported that the 
Personnel Committees of Colleges I and II have discussed the proposed 
policy in relationship to the Katz Report which, she noted, was drawn 
jp in anticipation of a quota system. She has assured the faculty 
that items (3) and (4) do not mean extensive curriculum planning. In 
expressing concurrence with item (2) , giving weight to teaching and 
service, she praised the response of the UM/Boston faculty in devisin;; 
lew systems and serving on innumerable committees and task forces. 
She listed the following concerns: (1) the option of not counting 
/ears of instructorship toward the seven-year pretenure period (delayed 
tenure evaluation if not counted), (2) early retirement, (3) the 
question of uniformity within and between campuses, (4) specific alte^- 
latives to tenure and (5) a tenure option for part-time faculty, 
Especially women. Dr. Wood noted that the last item is also impor- 
tant for the Medical School. Dr. Marshall concurred with Ms. Robinson 
that the campus should develop the specific alternatives; however, 
she felt the remaining concerns needed Board consideration. There 
«ras consensus that the draft statement should receive careful scrutiny 



398? 

F & EP Comm. 
9-22-72 

Tenure Policy 
Doc. T73-028 



3988 



F & EP Comm. 
9-22-72 

Tenure Policy 
T73-028 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Name Change: 
Department of 
Recreation to 
Department of 
Leisure 
Studies and 
Services 
Doc. T73-024 



UM/ Amherst — 
Proposal for 
Ma j or in 
Afro- American 
Studies 
Doc. T73-022 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

at the campus level from which source questions and suggestions are 
expected. As Chairman Troy explained, the Trustees will eventually 
establish broad guidelines for tenure, within which the individual 
campuses can work out their own specific requirements. 

Professor Short pointed out that untenured faculty may 
concentrate on establishing national recognition rather than within 
the University to enhance their personal reputation. Although this 
is a possibility, Chairman Troy said that most professors also want 
to make a good record on their own campus and are dedicated to 
their teaching. 

Replying to a question from Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, 
President Wood said that the Donahue Committee will be submitting a 
report on retirement and fringe benefits soon. 

Professor Lyons, UM/Boston, urged the Trustees to consider 
in the tenure picture those persons who have achieved outstanding 
records scholastically, but might be forced to withdraw from employ- 
ment consideration at the University because its tenure policies 
negate their opportunities. They might even leave the profession 
entirely. This can be detrimental to the University as well as to 
higher education generally. 

In closing the discussion on this item, Chairman Troy notec 
the sensitivity of the subject of tenure. He mentioned the possibility 
of more appointments at the Instructor and Assistant Professor levels 
and proposed this for discussion at the next meeting of the Committee 

The Committee then considered the Name Change: Department 



of Recreation to Department of Leisure Studies and Services, UM/ 



Amherst (Doc. T73-024 ) . Professor William E. Randall, Head of the 
Department, reviewed the evolution of the recreation courses at the 
University from 1937 to the present time. Concentration is now on 
the preparation of specialists for supervisory or executive responsi- 
bilities under the broader connotation of leisure studies. Mr. Ran- 
dall cited other universities, courses, and publications using this 
term of reference. President Wood requested that publicity on the 
change be restricted to academic circles. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

name of the Department of Recreation, UM/Amherst, 
be changed to the Department of Leisure Studies 
and Services . 

Dr. Michael Thelwell, Head of the Department, presented the 
Proposal for a Major in Afro-American Studies, UM/Amherst (Doc. T73- 



022 ) . Since its creation early in 1970, the Department has steadily 



expanded and is now ready to offer a major under the humanities, 
social sciences, and history in the Department of Humanities and Fine 
Arts. Interest is expected both at the University itself and through 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

the Five-College Program. This specialized study started in the 
sophomore year will be highly advantageous upon graduation. Pre- 
sent enrollment is approximately 25 of the 800 black students on the 
Amherst campus. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve a major in Afro-American Studies in the 
W.E.B. DuBois Department of Afro-American Studies, 
UM/ Amherst, School of Humanities and Fine Arts. 

Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall noted that the newly appoint 
Director of Afro-American Studies, UM/Boston, Douglas Davison, has 
started developing a program in cooperation with other institutions 
in the metropolitan area. 

Chairman Troy then turned to the Tenure Appointment for 
Ruth Mirolli, UM/Boston (Doc. T73-027 ). Acting Vice Chancellor 
Marshall reviewed Dr. Mirolli' s outstanding qualifications and 
referred to a previous understanding with Dr. Lowry, Head of the Art 
Department, that such an appointment would be forthcoming. Ms. 
Mirolli is an internationally recognized scholar in 19th-century art 
history with many years of teaching experience and with an impressive 
list of publications. Replying to Trustee Ladd, Dr. Marshall said 
that all candidates for positions are investigated by consulting with 
contemporaries with-whom they have previously been associated, and 
by rigorous testing of individual philosophies and performance — all 
prior to recommendation for appointment. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Dr. 
Ruth Mirolli be appointed as an Associate Pro- 
fessor with Tenure in the Art Department at UM/ 
Boston effective January 25, 1973. 

Professor Gilbert Lawall, Head, Department of Classics, 
presented the Proposals for Majors in Judaic Studies and Near Eastern 



ed 



Studies (Doc. T73-021 ) , UM/ Amherst. Both would be interdisciplinary 
and interdepartmental within the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
Five-College Program would be involved. Flexibility of courses has 
been maintained to permit coordination with personal interests and 
career plans of the students. 

Dr. Lawall noted that a five-college seminar this fall of 
the faculties in Judaic and Near Eastern Studies will promote inter- 
action in these areas. President Wood and Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
also reported interest at each respective five-college level (Presi- 
dents and Deputies) in augmenting collaboration; however, the size of 
the University implies that it will make a heavier contribution. 
Dean Allen commented that the individual faculty members must be the 
source of cooperation. 



3989 



F & EP Comm. 
9-22-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Proposal for 
Major in Afro- 
American Studies 
Doc. T73-022 



UM/Boston — 
Tenure Appointment 
Ruth Mirolli 
Doc. T73-027 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposals for 
Majors in Judaic 
Studies and Near 
Eastern Studies 
Doc. T73-021 



3990 

F & EP Comm. 
9-22-72 



COMMITTEE 

UM/AMherst — 
Award of Tenure, 
Dr. Donald R. 
Progulske 
Doc. T73-026 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve Majors in Judaic Studies and Near Eastern 
Studies in the School of Humanities and Fine 
Arts, UM/Amherst. 

The Committee then considered the Award of Tenure to Dr , 
Donald R. Progulske, UM/Amherst (Doc. T73-026 ) . Vice Chancellor 



Gluckstern reviewed the events leading to Dr. Progulske' s appointment 
without tenure as Head of the Department of Forestry and Wildlife 
Management effective August 6, 1972. He has a commendable record of 
experience and publication in the area of environmental concerns and 
will be working closely with other units on the Amherst campus in 
developing natural resources and exploiting potentials for develop- 
ing environmental quality. A very adequate review of Dr. Progulske V 
credentials was made before the appointment was recommended. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the award of tenure to Dr. Donald R. 
Progulske, Head, Department of Forestry and Wild- 
life Management, UM/Amherst, effective October 4, 
1972. 

Chairman Troy referred to the continued interest expressed 
by Trustee Abrams (Student Activities Committee discussion, May 26, 
1972; Full Board vote, June 28, 1972; and Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee discussion, August 29, 1972) concerning encouragement 
of minority-race students in undergraduate preparation for entrance 
into the Medical School. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern will prepare 
information for discussion at the next meeting of the Committee. 



The meeting was adjourned at 12 noon. 



I 




Secretary X Board of Trustee* 



] 



COMMITTEE 



II 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
September 26, 1972; 12:00 noon; Office of the President, Boston, Mass 



RESENT: 



Trustees and Trustee Staff: 



Chairman Healey, President Wood; Trustees Pumphret, Troy; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Kelly, Ladd 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Mr. 
Gartenberg, Mr. Searson 

Office of the Secretary : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
Budget Director Gulko 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Assistant Provost 
Babcock; Professor Lyons, representing University Senate 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Saunders 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Healey at 12:00 noon. 

At President Wood's request and on motion made and seconded 
Lt was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
considering further the 1974 FY Budget Request. 



After extended discussion, and on motion made and seconded, 



Lt was 

VOTED : 



To come out of executive session for the purpose of 
considering additional agenda items. 



Acting Chancellor Hamilton, UM/Boston, stated that the 
Jniversity Assembly Constitution (Doc. T73-030 ) is the result of a 



pear of study and discussion. It was approved by the faculty and 
students this past spring. After approval of this Constitution, the 
University Assembly will replace the University Senate at UM/Boston. 
Delegates to the Assembly are being elected in anticipation of 
ultimate approval by the Trustees. 

Dr. Wood, noting the lengthy and careful consideration which 
las been given to the document, assured the Committee that the 
authority of the Board is absolutely protected, particularly in 
Section I, paragraph 6. He had hoped to bring the Constitutions for 
Colleges I and II to the Committee simultaneously with this one; 



3991 



UM/Boston — 
Governance : 
University 
Assembly 
Constitution 
(Doc. T73-030) 



3992 

Exec. Comm. 
9-26-72 

UM/Boston — 
Governance: 
University 
Assembly Con- 
stitution 
Doc. T73-030 

LUMMITT EE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Honorary 
Degree 
Nominees 
Doc. T73-029 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

lowever, Acting Chancellor Hamilton has agreed that, if all three are 
lot ready for the October 4 meeting of the Board, the College docu- 
nents will be deferred. During that time, the overall governing 
locument at UM/Boston will be the Constitution of the University 
Assembly. 

Dr. Hamilton introduced Assistant Provost Donald Babcock 
and Dr. Richard Lyons, the newly elected faculty representative of 
the University Senate. 

Trustee Pumphret objected to Section IV, paragraph 14, 
which requires a committee of the Assembly every five years to review 
and "make recommendations on the reappointment of all personnel hold- 
ing major administrative positions. . .not subject to regular review... 
to:. Babcock explained that this was taken from the existing Consti- 
tution and was intended to provide for regular reviews of adminis- 
trative personnel. Several Trustees questioned whether it was appro- 
priate for the tenured faculty to assume such powers over non-tenured 
administrative personnel. Mr. Pumphret stated his intention to vote 
against this provision. Chairman Healey noted other questions about 
the document and declared that time limitations would not permit a 
Eull discussion of the Constitution at this meeting. The matter was 
deferred . 

Dr. Hamilton assured the Chairman that it is implicit in 
this Constitution that the Chancellor retains primary responsibility 
Eor all policies that govern the operation of the Boston campus. He 
nay (1) introduce proposed policies for consideration by the Assembly 
and (2) veto the Assembly's action and request reconsideration. 
Foreseeing conflicts in interpretation of responsibility for policy ii(i 
some sections of the Constitution, Chairman Healey and Trustee Troy 
indicated their need for more time to study the document. The Chair- 
nan suggested consideration by the Committee before the October 4 
Board meeting. President Wood and Acting Chancellor Hamilton will 
prepare an explanatory transmittal. 

Speaking generally of the Honorary Degree Nominees (Doc. 
r_73-029 ) , Mr. Healey requested the Honorary Degree Advisory Committee 



JM/Amherst, to submit from the aggregate of names nominated, eight or 
ten priority choices to the Executive Committee. He mentioned the 
traditional confidentiality requested of all Trustees in the selectio^i 
process until a formal press release is made at an appropriate time 
next spring. 

President Wood and Chancellor Bromery will provide Secretar 
McCartney with the new, priority list of nominees for distribution to 
the Trustees. 

Having been assured of her eligibility as a Trustee to make 
nominations, Ms. Kelly said that she will submit names to the Secre- 
tary for consideration along with background information. President 
Wood conveyed Trustee Rowland's conviction that Commencement should 
involve the entire University community and not merely the graduating 
Seniors. Chairman Healey proposed a special session to consider hon- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

orary degree recipients at the time of the Trustee retreat in October 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton, UM/Boston, presented an emer- 
gency request for six tuition scholarships for foreign students. 
Vice President Phillips referred to the May 31, 1968, vote of the 
Board allowing 20 such scholarships, which have traditionally gone to 
UM/Amherst recipients. Dr. Hamilton stated that there are over 100 
foreign students on the Boston campus, none being eligible for state 
or other financial aid. Mr. Babcock added that their visas do not 
permit taking time off to work. Questions were raised as to how many 
eventually become citizens, the possibility of reciprocal agreements 
number of students sponsored by their own government, etc. President 
Wood suggested provision for those in immediate need followed by a 
careful study of intentions and enrollment of foreign students at 
UM/Boston. Chairman Healey noted that enrollments of foreign stu- 
dents will increase at both UM/Amherst and UM/Boston and the Board 
should not approve a policy which can be used simply to keep people 
in this country. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve six tuition scholarships for foreign stu- 
dents at UM/Boston. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton requested that Chairman Healey 
appoint one or two Trustees to work with President Wood on Naming the 
Colleges at UM/Boston . Mr. Healey said that this is more appropriate 



ly a duty of the Committee on Buildings and Grounds , 
will be referred to that group. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:20 p.m. 



The request 




Secretary 



3993 



~> 



Exec. Comm. 
9-26-72 



UM/Amherst — 
Honorary Degree 
Nominees 
Doc. T73-029 

UM/Boston — 
Tuition 

Scholarships for 
Foreign Students 



UM/Bos ton- 
Naming of 
- Colleges 



3994 



COMMITTEE 



Fund Transfer for 
Disadvantaged 
Students Program 
Doc. T73-034 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
September 26, 1972; 2:30 p.m.; President's Office, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret, President 
Wood; Trustees Crowley, Knowles , Ladd, Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney; Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion, 
Budget Director Gulko 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Mr. Baxter 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Saunders 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 2:35 p.m. He 
called on Vice President Phillips to present the first item on the 
agenda, Fund Transfer for Disadvantaged Students Program (Doc. T73- 
034). 



Mr. Phillips reported to the Committee that the funds for 
this program were again as in past years, appropriated in the wrong 
subsidiary accounts, in spite of the fact that the appropriations 
request identified the correct accounts. The Committee is requested 
to merely move the $126,250 from the 03 account to the 13 account 
where in fact it is required. 

In response to a question by Trustee Crowley, Mr. Phillips 
explained that the Trustees have full authority to make these sub- 
sidiary transfers and that they are reported to the Comptroller's 
office immediately for their records. Chairman Pumphret said he 
understands that all of these transfers were reported. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the following transfer between subsidiary 
accounts as detailed in Document T73-034: 



ACCOUNT 
03 
13 



FROM 



$126,250 



TO 



$126,250 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee next considered the Request for Rate Change 
Approval - Campus Center Accommodation Services (Doc. T73-032 ) 



Vice Chancellor Campion reported that this item had been discussed 
with the SUG Board on some latitude to the management of the Campus 
Center Hotel facility. For example, in times of the year when low 
occupancy is predictable, the manager would have the latitude to 
offer lower rates. 

Chairman Pumphret expressed concern that the proposed vote 
did not allow enough flexibility for the Campus Center management. 
He urged that the vote be couched in more general terms without 
detailing a specific range of rates, but establishing minimums. 

Vice Chancellor Campion explained that when this matter 
was originally proposed, the Trustees requested the campus to come 
back with a more specific policy statement. 

Chairman Pumphret suggested that the wording be slightly 
altered to include the word "minimum" thus allowing more flexibility 
He felt that the Trustees should give the management the right to 
negotiate with groups during off-season periods. 

In response to a question, Chairman Pumphret explained thai: 
the Chancellor has the ultimate responsibility. It was suggested 
that the vote include the phrase "subject to the approval of the 
Chancellor." 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 
authority to deviate from existing rates 
established for the Campus Center Accommodation 
Services, Amherst Campus, be granted to the 
Chancellor for groups of 10 or more persons 
and according to the following schedule: 

a. Minimum rates of $12 for double occupancy 
may be offered during periods of the year 
when low occupancy is expected. 

b. Minimum rates for single occupancy of $10 
per room may be offered under the same 
circumstances . 

Deviation from established rates will, in each 
case, be subject to approval by the Chancellor. 

The Committee then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Top of the Campus Membership Fee (Doc. T73-033 ) . Vice Chancellor 
Campion explained that the proposed vote was contingent upon approva 
by the Top of the Campus annual membership meeting. He reported 
that the approval was given at the meeting on Sunday evening, 
September 24, 1972. 



Finance Comm. 
9-26-72 

UM/ Amherst — 
Request for Rate 
Change Approval 
Campus Center 
Accommodation 
Services 
Doc. T73-032 



UM/ Amherst — 
Top of Campus 
Membership Fee 
Doc. T73-033 



3996 

Finance Comm. 
9-26-72 



UM/ Amherst — 
Top of Campus 
Membership Fee 
Doc. T73-033 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Fund Transfer 
Doc. T73-035 



UM/ Amherst — 
Opposition to 
Parking Fee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Pumphret explained that the differential in price 
for membership was to distinguish between those students who paid the 
Campus Center fee and those people who did not. He said the students 
already carry a heavy burden and that this membership fee differential 
was appropriate. 

Regarding student opinion on the matter, Mr. Campion 
explained that it was the Student Union Campus Center Governing Boarc 
that had originally proposed the vote. 

Chancellor Bromery reported to the Committee that he sup- 
ported this proposed vote on membership fee. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
vote approval that the Top of the Campus, Inc. 
membership fee for the 1972-73 academic year be 
one dollar ($1.00) for all students otherwise 
eligible for membership who have paid a regular 
Campus Center Fee, and five dollars ($5.00) for 
all other persons eligible for membership; and 
further, that the Board of Directors of Top of 
the Campus, Inc. be charged to review and eval- 
uate the consequences of such a membership fee 
schedule, and report its findings to the Member- 
ship not later than the 1973 annual meeting of 
Top of the Campus, Inc., such report to include 
a recommendation for membership fees to be charged 
for the 1973-74 academic year. 

The final item on the agenda was a Report of a Fund Trans- 
fer on the Boston Campus (Doc. T73-035 ) . Mr. Baxter, the Budget 
Officer of the campus, reported to the Committee that the following 
fund transfer is consistent with the expenditure plan approved by 
the Board of Trustees: 



I 



P 



ACCOUNT 


FROM 


TO 


02 




$40,000 


12 




10,000 


15 


$50,000 
$50,000 




TOTAL 


$50,000 



President Wood then asked Vice Chancellor Campion to reporl: 
on the status of a petition received by the Trustees opposing the 
parking fee at the Amherst campus. 

Mr. Campion explained that there were approximately 850 
signatures on this petition from faculty and staff. He explained 
that the parking fee registration was recommended by the Parking 
Council, which is made up of representatives of all persons using 
the facilities. The money collected covers only the cost of operat- 



P 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It does not cover repairs, lighting, 



1 



I 



ing the registration system 
and other maintenance items 



President Wood said he did not feel that the Trustees 
should bear the burden. He recommended that Chancellor Bromery 
write a letter to the petitioners explaining the situation. The 
Chancellor agreed and said that he would take appropriate action. 

In response to a question regarding the Campus Center 
Parking Garage, Mr. Campion reported that it is doing better and 
sustaining its share of the debt service. 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:55 p.m. 




cCartney 

Board of Trusti 




3991 



y 



Finance Comm. 
9-26-72 

UM/ Amherst — 
Opposition to 
Parking Fee 



3998 



COMMITTEE 



Introductory 
Remarks 



UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Schematic 
Drawings for 
Building 030 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

September 28, 1972; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office, 85 Devonshire St. 

Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

President Wood, Trustees Chandler, Crowley, Knowles, Pumphr^t, 
Assistant Secretary Rawn, Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Troy 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

President's Office : Vice President Lashman, Treasurer 
Johnson, Mr. Searson 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Prof. Robbins, 
representing the faculty, Mr. Prince, of the Planning 
Office, Mr. Getson, Mr. Finnegan, Dean Strange (CPCS), Dr. 
Hogarty (CPCS), Dr. Bennett (CPCS) 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Architects : Barry Coletti and staff; George Notter and 
James Alexander; Mr. Roth, architectural consultant 

Bureau of Building Construction (BBC) : Mr. Cusack 



President Wood convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. in the 
absence of the Chairman, Trustee Haigis. He reported that during the 
summer there has been a continuing review of the original plans for 
Buildings 030 (College of Public and Community Service), and 120 
(Physical Education) at the Columbia Point campus. The President 
reviewed the planning developments at the Columbia Point campus begin 
ning with the Committee's discussion in December questioning whether 
the plans devised in the 1960 's were still applicable to educational 
changes in the 1970's. The campus began a series of intensive plan- 
ning reviews in early June resulting in some useful revisions in 
building programs and leading to further discussions on campus plan- 
ning generally. 

The President turned to the first item on the agenda, 
Approval of Schematic Drawings for Building 030 . He reported that in 



June with the assistance of Harold Roth, John Strange, Dean of CPCS, 
and his committee had begun a review of the plans for Building 030. 
Dr. Strange had held a series of meetings during the summer with 
Barry Coletti, the architect, regarding the design of the building. 
President Wood then called upon Dean Strange to discuss the plans for 
Building 030. 

Dean Strange informed the Committee that he and faculty 
members, Richard Hogarty and Ruth Bennett, had reviewed the plans of 



P 



P 



P 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Building 030 with the Planning Office. He mentioned that he and his 
planning committee had directed the architect's specific attention to 
the following items: (1) that the office and classroom space be com- 
bined in the same general areas, (2) that more attention be paid to 
lecture hall space, (3) that specific plans for science space be 
delayed pending further science planning, (4) that the concept of 
student areas and study space be given greater attention, (5) that 
flexibility be emphasized, (6) that the dining areas be designed to 
better be incorporated with the learning experience, (7) that outside 
terrace space be more closely tied to other functions, (8) that they 
attempt to discourage use of the parking facilities (and cars) for 
study between classes, and (10) that the classroom space be flexible 
enough for any changes in programs twenty or thirty years from now. 

Mr. Coletti, architect for the building, then reported to 
the Committee with the aid of diagrams and models how these academic 
plans were incorporated into the design. He began his presentation 
by explaining the concept of an open "street" down the center of the 
building with the building being divided into two primary functions: 
(1) the smaller-sized classroom and faculty office space, and (2) the 
larger-sized study areas, lecture halls, and dining and recreational 
spaces. 

General discussion followed. Trustee Troy inquired if the 
whole college could meet in any single space. Dean Strange reported 
that the largest facility in the Building would be the gymnasium which 
would hold approximately 500 people. The largest lecture hall could 
hold 250 people; the basketball court in the large physical education 
building could hold 3000 if necessary. 

In response to a question regarding recreation areas, 
Acting Chancellor Hamilton reminded the Committee that each college 
was designed to provide a sense of community which included both 
academic and nonacademic space. 

Trustee Pumphret asked about the comparison of academic 
space to recreational space. He expressed concern that the Trustees 
were responsible to the public in authorizing the plans for these 
buildings and they should be satisified that the allocations of spac£ 
are reasonable. President Wood said that the net effect of Dean 
Strange 's review has been to re-emphasize the importance of study 
space. The President added that this was designed as a commuter cam 
pus and certain functions that might normally be part of a dormitory 
complex at a traditional university must be integrated with academic 
units at Columbia Point. 

Acting ChancellorHamilton informed the Committee that a 
comparative breakdown of use of space would be available to the 
Trustees at the full Board meeting on October 4. Trustee Pumphret 
stated that he wants to look at such a comparative analysis before th£ 
final vote at that meeting. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 



3999 

B & G Comm. 
9-28-72 

UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Schematic 
Drawings for 
Building 030 



4000 

B & G Comm. 
9-28-72 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Preliminary 
Drawings for 
Building 120 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 
of the schematic drawings for Building 030. 

The Committee then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Approval of Preliminary Drawings for Building 120 (Physical Education) 



The President asked Mr. Notter to present the drawings. He explained 
that the Board had approved the schematic drawings for the building 
in July. His presentation, based on diagrams and models, included 
reference to such aspects of the building as the internal circulation 
patterns, the nature of the participant and spectator levels, the 
redesigned north entrance, the landscaping and creation of athletic 
(facilities, and general design characteristics. He reported that the 
preliminary drawings show a refinement of space, from 175,000 GSF to 
167,000 GSF. The design is within the allocated budget. 

General discussion followed on a variety of topics. Trusted 
Knowles asked about the problems of control of the internal ramp (in 
terms of the open center portion of the ramp) and whether the glass 
an the west wall would have any adverse effect on heat control. 
However, she indicated she thought the general design was impressive 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton informed the Committee that the 
architects have tried to address themselves to some of the concerns 
that Trustee Pumphret expressed at the earlier presentation. He 
discussed the nature of the use of the Physical Education Building by 
the surrounding communities. As part of the procedure of improved 
control, the Acting Chancellor pointed to the revised circulation 
patterns and the smaller number of permanent gallery seats with the 
increased emphasis on folding bleachers. 



Treasurer Johnson expressed aesthetic 
about the use of a ramp facility as opposed to s 
architects explained that the advantages of the 
in capacity at heavily used times, cost, safety, 
tages over other vertical people-moving systems 
and elevators (there will be one elevator for th 
first aid purposes). The President informed the 
would have an analysis of the ramp costs before 
ing. He reported that the full Board would be g 
at the meeting next week. 



and cost concerns 

tairwells . The 

ramp included increas 

and relative advan- 
such as escalators 
e handicapped and for 

Committee that they 
the full Board meet- 
iven this presentation 



It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the approval 
of the preliminary drawings of Building 120 with 
the reservation that further information on the 
ramp system would be provided before the final vote. 

President Wood pointed out that work has been underway to 
evaluate the effects that possible changes of enrollment might have 
on the future planning of the Columbia Point campus. A committee at 
UM/Boston has been studying these questions as they relate to the 
program and plans for Building 080/2. That committee will submit an 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

interim report to Acting Chancellor Hamilton and the President 
shortly. President Wood said that it is essential to provide flexi- 
bility in design to meet enrollment and academic changes at Columbia 
Point. Acting Chancellor Hamilton agreed that this analysis is 
essential, however difficult such a review might be for the campus. 

President Wood also pointed to the importance of joining thje 
design personnel with the academic program personnel in the planning 
process. The plans for Building 030 justified this joining of 
forces in the planning process. He felt that the revised plans sub- 
mitted in this review were in no way designed to degrade the origi- 
nal plans for the campus but were only designed to reflect the 
changes necessitated in the 1970 's. 

Dean Soutter reported the latest developments regarding the 
gift of 100 cubic yards of loam (worth approximately $750) to the 
Worcester Little League. The Board approved the gift in a spirit of 
good will in December, 1971. It now appears that the field needs at 
least 1000 cubic yards of loam (worth considerably more). 

General discussion followed on the problems surrounding 
this issue of loam. The University's Legal Counsel, Mr. Searson, 
raised some legal questions concerning the gift. There was a general 
consensus among the Committee members that they should not increase 
the size of the gift since it is not clear that there is enough loam 
left over for the Medical School property. Also, there might be a 
need for loam at the Boston campus in the near future. 

The Committee agreed that they had originally intended the 
gift of loam as an expression of good will by the University and that 
the vote they took last year would remain in effect. The request for 
an increase in the gift of loam would remain in abeyance. 

The Committee then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Progress Report: Power Plant and Medical Science Buildings (UM/ 



Worcester) . Dean Soutter explained he is facing problems regarding 
the construction of and occupancy of these two buildings. On 
December 15th, the Power Plant Building will be ready for partial 
occupancy and the campus must supply heat and a work force of 18 men 
to maintain the buildings. The Medical Science Building will be 
completed in the fall of 1973 with partial occupancy scheduled for 
February 1973. The Dean informed the Committee that the three pro- 
blems regarding these partial occupancies were money, manpower 
(positions), and time. 

General discussion followed. The Dean of the Medical 
School reported that he and Vice President Phillips have looked over 
many alternatives but that the basic problem remains lack of money. 
He informed the Committee that he would do his best to spend as 
wisely as possible in the next few months but that they might need to 
turn to a state contingency fund if they run out of funds as would 
most likely happen because of this situation. The Committee agreed 
with this course of action. 



400 



9-28-72 

B & G Comm. 

UM/Boston — 
Comments on 
Building 080/2 



UM/Worcester- 
Gift of Loam 



UM/Worcester — 
Progress Report on 
Power Pland and 
Medical Science 



f > 



B&G Comm. 
9-28-72 

UM/Worcester — 
Discussion of 
Future Use of 
Shaw Building 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The final item on the agenda, Preliminary Discussion of 
the Future Use of the Shaw Building , was presented by Dean Soutter. 
He reported to the Committee that preliminary discussion has been 
underway for some time. The tentative plan is for the Worcester 
Department of Public Health to use 60% of the building. They have 
a staff of approximately 119 and would need the lab facilities. The 
other 40% of the Building would be utilized by the Red Cross Blood 
Bank Program. The Dean informed the Committee that this program has 
a real problem in terms of space. At the present time they must 
send blood out of town to be reprocessed, but if they are in the 
Shaw Building, they can do the blood processing there. The Dean alsb 
said that the City of Worcester feels that this is a reasonable use 
of the building, especially with the teaching hospital located 
nearby . 

Discussion followed on some of the complications of rent- 
ing the building. The Dean said that he would like to have the 
University continue operating the building (utilities, repairs, etc.|) 
and have these two organizations pay a rental fee; however, the 
rent receipts would most likely go into general state treasury. The 
problems relating to rentals based on amortization costs would make 
it difficult for the prospective tenants to use the building. 

It was the general consensus of the Committee that the 
concept of such a use of the Shaw Building is beneficial, but that 
they would need to have legal opinion on the matter as well as fur- 
ther information from the Treasurer on alternative financial arrangej- 
ments possible in this situation. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:00 p.m. 




UJ> 




Robert J./ McCartney 
Secretaryy Board of Trus 




f 



I 



t 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
October 23, 1972; 3:00 p.m.; Crown Room, Sheraton Regal Inn, Hyannis 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 
Wood; Trustees Boyden, Chandler, Kelly, Ladd, Shaler, 
Snowden, Troy; Secretary McCartney, Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 3:10 p.m. and 
loted that the only agenda item for the meeting was a discussion of 
the definition of the role of the Student Activities Committee, How- 
ever , she expressed concern that the President's Working Group on 
Counseling, Advising, and Support Services should present a progress 
report to the Committee in the near future. President Wood stated 
that he felt that this would be very appropriate. He called upon 
the Chancellor to comment. 

Chancellor Bromery reported that Vice Chancellor Gage had 
listributed an excellent paper to the student affairs staff at 
Amherst regarding the directions of student affairs. Mrs. Rowland 
asked that it be sent to the members of this Committee. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton reported informally on the 
reorganization of the student affairs area at the Boston campus. He 
said that the campus is taking into consideration and attempting to 
Lmplement the recommendations of the Gage Committee on Counseling, 
Advising, and Support Services. He added that the Offices of Fin- 
ancial Aid, Admissions, Special Admissions, Outreach, Recruitment, 
md Advising have been placed under the supervision of one person in 
the Provost's Office. Health Services, Athletics, Vocation Guidance 
and Placement, and RSO report directly to the Chancellor's Office, 
sending formal reorganization. 

Dr. Hamilton expressed concern about the future delivery of 
these services on the campus for a number of reasons. One is the 
luestion of obtaining new positions to be funded in FY 1974. There 
Ls much to be done and a limited staff to complete it. A suggestion 
las been made to call in consultants to advise the campus adminis- 
tration. 



4003 



Student Act. 
10-23-72 

4 004 



Conn a 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery suggested that the Boston campus share 
:he experience that the Amherst campus has had in the area of unpaid 
:utorial and outreach programs. Faculty working for the CCEBS pro- 
gram at UM/Amherst have never been paid. Dr. Bromery noted that 
CEBS could have sent students to the Boston campus if there had been 
zooperative effort in the past. They are still interested in future 
exchanges. He also mentioned that they had found their students were 
:he best recruiters for the program. 

Dr. Hamilton informed the Committee that the UM/Boston 
admissions policy would have a major impact on the housing issue in 
Dorchester. He reported that there were 8,000 graduates of Boston 
ligh schools a year, with less than 600 minority students in a college 
zourse. Thus, he feels it necessary to get into the high schools to 
3egin to recruit. Dean Marshall noted that the College Preparatory 
rogram has been bringing high school students onto the campus. 

Dr. Hamilton added that offerings on the Boston campus are 
Limited to a liberal arts program. He said that perhaps the campus 
should look at the possibility of broadening the range of attraction 
to recruit more minority students. 

General discussion followed on the role of the Student 
Activities Committee. Trustee Shaler said that he saw last year as 
theoretical. This year, he said, should be an action-oriented year 
for the Committee. He views the role of the Committee as that of a 
facilitator: helping the campuses to implement policies enacted by 
the Trustees. Mr. Shaler also suggested that this Committee's 
neetings be held as "hearings," similar to SWAP conferences. 

Chairman Rowland raised several questions for the Committee 
to consider: Should the Committee concern itself with admissions 
policy? Do the students see this Committee as an avenue for them to 
nake requests and get changes? How can the Committee be responsive 
to questions raised by Dr. Hamilton? 

She commented that the Bylaws are out-of-date and pointed 
Dut that in the description of duties for the Student Activities Com- 
nittee in the present Trustee Bylaws, section (a) had generally been 
ielegated to the Chancellors and section (b) should be more central 
to the Committee's role. 

Mr. Ladd feels that the Trustees would be helpful if they 
apply pressure to the campus administrators to make changes. He also 
relieves student activities are a function of educational policy. 

Trustee Snowden reminded the Committee that the whole thrusl: 
af the Gage Committee came as an outgrowth of UM/Boston black student 

demands . 

Chancellor Bromery commented that he felt that there should 
oe a Student Activities Committee as well as the Faculty and Educa- 
tional Policy Committee, each dealing in concerns of the respective 
constituents. He stated that the Trustees should support the adminis-- 
trators after decisions have been made. 



4005 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood summed up the discussions stating that there 
was a feeling of general consensus that the role of the Committee 
should be redefined. He felt that the Committee had been very active 
and helpful last year for the students on all campuses. The Presi- 
dent also informed the Committee that the Wellman working group on 
University governance had not completed its work, and that hopefully 
the revised Trustee Bylaws would be completed in November. 

Dean Marshall expressed concern that a major emphasis of 
student affairs at the Boston campus will be directed toward com- 
nunity relations at Columbia Point. She said that the new area of 
relations between students and the community will be difficult to 
2ope with without substantial assistance in resources. 

Trustee Chandler raised a question regarding the routing 
for Trustee discussion of the items raised by the Carnegie Commission 
report. Dr. Wood responded that some items may be discussed in the 
Faculty and Educational Policy Committee; others in the Student 
Activities Committee; or — in some instances — in both Committee 
neetings. 

Chairman Rowland reminded the Committee that its function 
Ls to recommend policy to the Board of Trustees. Once policy is set 
ay the Board, the administration has the responsibility to make sure 
Lt is carried out. It is also the function of the administration to 
report back to the Committee on the progress of the campuses. 

The President noted that the general item of housing con- 
cerns all three campuses. Initially, this should be discussed by 
the Student Activities Committee. 

Trustee Shaler suggested that the Committee hold informal 
neetings on the separate campuses to hear from faculty, students, and 
administrators in order to find out how this Committee could best 
serve their needs . 

Chairman Rowland questioned whether the Committee should 
consider the subject of admissions policy. President Wood stated 
that he felt it was within the province of the Committee, but that it 
depended on the interest of the members. Trustee Shaler observed 
that this topic had been discussed at the time the report of the Gage 
Committee was being considered and that it would be appropriate to 
follow through. The President urged the Committee to broaden its 
range. 

Trustee Snowden reminded the Trustees that the Committee 
had worked long and hard on a policy statement on counseling, advis- 
ing and support services . She felt that this matter should remain on 
the agenda, adding that the Committee needs to know how this policy ik 
being implemented, on the campuses. Mrs. Snowden would like to broadeji 
the Committee's agenda but not at the cost of leaving this area of 
concern unfinished . 



Student Act. Comm. 
10-23-72 



4006 



Student Act. Comm 
10-23-72 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood suggested that Trustee Snowden's concerns 
should be stipulated in rephrasing the role of the Committee. He will. 
ilso circulate two or three other items related to the Committee's 
ole. 

Chairman Rowland queried how the living /learning centers 
were doing. The Committee had approved these centers months ago. 
Chancellor Bromery replied that the centers are doing well. He will 
forward status reports in the near future. He added that it would be 
ixciting for the Committee to hear what the dynamics of implementing 
some of the policies have been. 

Trustee Shaler and Mrs. Rowland suggested that the Committee, 
neet on the Boston campus with students there and devote the entire 
meeting to concerns from that campus. Dean Marshall reported that the 
Jniversity Assembly is in the process of selecting its committees and 
/hen they finish, meeting arrangements will be finalized. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton added that there were several 
/ays to acquire an understanding of the Boston campus. He reminded 
:he Trustees that they are welcome to attend any meeting of the Univei 
sity Assembly, made up of 60% faculty and 40% students. The meetings 
ire held every two weeks. Dr. Hamilton could also set up a general 
session for the Trustees on the campus and have anyone they want 
:here to supply them with information. 

Chairman Rowland said that Dr . Hamilton and Dean Marshall 
should let the President know when the most convenient time for a 
neeting on the campus would be and the President would circulate a 
iroposed agenda. 

Mrs. Rowland thanked the Committee and reminded them that 
:here would be a meeting at the SWAP conference on November 18, 1972, 
(Saturday afternoon) as has been the custom in the past. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:50 p.m. 




tobert J 
Secretar 



r 



! 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
October 24, 1972; 2:30 p.m. Sheraton-Regal Inn, Hyannis, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : President Wood; Trustees 
Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Secretary McCartney 

Visiting Trustees : Boyden, Chandler, Crowley, Kelly, Ladd, 
Shaler 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 



In the absence of Chairman Healey, President Wood convened 
the meeting at 2:30 p.m. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose 

of considering nominations for honorary degrees 
at UM/ Amherst. 

It was later moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose of 
taking action on the nominees for honorary degrees 
at UM/Amherst. 

It was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board 6f Trustees that they 
approve the list of nominees and alternates for 
honorary degrees at the UM/Amherst Commencement 
on May 26, 1973, as detailed in a confidential' 
memorandum on file in the Office of the Secretary 
and to instruct the Chancellor, UM/Amherst to 
proceed immediately with the invitations . 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:30 p.m. 





1M/ 
Robert J. /Mc/Cartney 

Secretary ,^Board of Trus 




400? 



UM/Amherst — 
Honorary Degrees 
Commencement 1973 



4008 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Fire Station 
Site 



UM/Worcester — 
Power Plant 
Personnel 



UM/Boston — 
Utility Building 
Personnel 



Capital Outlay 
Review 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
November 10, 1972; 10;00 a.m.; President's Office, One Washington Mai 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Acting Chairman Crowley, 
President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Howes, Pumphret; 
Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney;.' (Mrs. Holden, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg, Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Planning Officer Littlefield, Budget Officer 
Gulko 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Planning Officer 
Prince 

UM/Worcester : Associate Dean Stockwell 



President Wood invited informal comments prior to the con- 
vening of the formal session of the Committee. 

Planning Officer Littlefield, UM/Amherst, reported that a 
decision on the site for a fire station to be built by the Town of 
Amherst will be made soon. The land will then be transferred to the 
Town of Amherst as voted by the Trustees on June 29, 1970. Trustee 
Howes noted that, although the bypass road will not be completed unt|l 
1974, DPW design hearings, which are expected soon, will permit 
action on the fire station site. 

Associate Dean Stockwell reported that lack of funds for 
salaries of engineers presents a serious problem as operation of the 
Power Plant at the Medical School approaches. The Power Plant and 
the Science Building will require approximately 40 persons, costing 
around $300,000. A detailed request will be brought to the Trustees 
soon. 

UM/Boston Acting Chancellor Hamilton echoed the problem, 
indicating a need for 18 persons (cost: about $33,000) tc ^operate 
the central utility building at Columbia Point. 

Trustee Pumphret urged that similarities and differences 
in the staffing patterns of the two operations be carefully outlined 
since the request .will be presented simultaneously. 

The formal meeting was convened by Acting Chairman Crowley 
at 10:30 a.m. In addition to its other business, the Committee took 
note of the fact that this is the customary time when the capital 
outlay reviews are conducted. Last year, no state capital- outlay 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

budget was submitted by the Executive Department to the General 
Court. Accordingly, the University's request made at that time is 
still outstanding. 

Nevertheless, the administration and the Trustees have con- 
tinued to review capital requirements and building programs in the 
context of enrollment projections, academic program changes and the 
general state fiscal situation. While these reviews are not yet at 
the stage where specific project revisions can be identified, it is 
clear that present requirements will not exceed — and should in 
important instances — be less than — those contained in last year's 
budget. 

Certain new and urgent priorities have emerged. At Amherst 
for example, the completion of plans by the Town of Amherst and the 
State Department of Public Works for the improvement of transportatioh 
facilities will make it necessary for the University to relocate cer- 
tain buildings and roads to accommodate the needs of the community 
and the state. Equipment must be purchased for the teaching hospital 
at Worcester for the hospital is now under construction. The Boston 
campus must continue its building program for which architectural 
designs and initial construction outlays have been authorized although 
certain modifications and changes in 'program use now seem possible 
with a resulting increase in the effectiveness of the Columbia Point 
campus . 

Therefore, in place of any formal action at this time, the 
Committee recommends that the Board support the thorough on-going 
review of capital outlay needs now underway by the President's 
Office, the Chancellors and the Dean of the Medical School. The Com- 
mittee recommends that all involved intensify their efforts to com- 
plete this review with the purpose of giving to the Board at the 
earliest possible date a picture of the course of University develop- 
ment for the next five years. In this way, the Board believes the 
Commonwealth can understand both the character of the investment it 
has made in the University over the last decade and the timetable 
for the completion of the University's major developments, programs, 
and benefits which will be forthcoming. 

Accordingly, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
thorough review of University developments, 
requirements, and investments over the next five 
years be continued at the President's Office and 
campuses and that a presentation of these studies 
be made at an early date. 

The Committee next considered the Site Development and Con- 
struction Drawings of a Nonpermanent Facility Supporting the Depart- 



ment of Transportation Demonstration Bus Operation, UM/ Amherst (Doc. 
T73-059 ) . Planning Officer Littlef ield displayed plans showing the 



4009 

B & G Comm. 
11-10-72 

Capital Outlay 
Review 



UM/ Amherst — 
Site Development 



4010 

B & G Comm. 
11-10-72 



UM/Amherst — 
Site Development 
and Construction 
Drawings of a 
Nonpermanent 

. , . COMMITTEE 

Facility Support- 
ing the DOT 
Demonstration 
Operation 
Doc. T73-059 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Location of the proposed building to the north of Governor's Drive 
Dpposite the Physical Plant Building. This facility, estimated to 
;ost $60,000, will house 10 buses and provide fuel storage and office 
space for the operation. The proposed no-fare bus system will be 
integrated with the Student Senate Transit Bus System to provide a 
liable alternative to the automobile for commuting ■ students and staf] : 
luring the spring and fall semesters of 1973. An evaluation prior to 
Bus the spring semester of 1974 will determine whether the program will 

ae continued, expanded, or terminated. Mr. Littlefield commented tha{, 
Lf successful, the program will lead to a significant improvement in 
traffic conditions on the campus and within the Town of Amherst. 
Treasurer Johnson urged that every effort be made through color 
selection of paint, landscaping, fencing, etc., to achieve an 
aesthetic blending of the building into the western panorama of the 
University. 

Planning Officer Littlefield also reported the gift from th<> 
Peter Pan Bus Company of a small, plexiglass shelter for passengers to 
je placed temporarily at the turn-around by the Campus Center Garage. 
This will be relocated at a later date if a shelter affording greater 
capacity is needed to accommodate the enlarged bus system. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the site development and construction 
drawings of a nonpermanent facility supporting the 
Department of Transportation bus operation, as 
outlined in Document T73-059 . 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:55 a.m. 




Robert J 
Secretar 




cCartney 

Board of Trustees 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
November 15, 1972; 12:15 p.m.; Office of the President, One Washingtor 

Mall, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood; 
Trustees Abrams, Boyden, Kelly, Ladd, Shaler, Secretary McCartney; 
Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Ms. 
Robinson, Fr. Walsh, Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, Assoc. Provost 
Hoopes; Prof. Shapiro, representing Faculty Senate; Messrs 
Apostola and Spriggs, representing Student Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall; Prof. Lyons, representing University 
Assembly; Profs. Safwat and Weaver 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 12:25 p.m. 

President Wood referred to the previous consideration of tl: 
proposed Tenure Policy by this Committee on September 22, at which 
meeting Ms. Robinson had reviewed Doc. T73-028 . Dr. Wood said 
advice was given at a recent meeting of the National Association of 
State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges to separate collective 
bargaining from the governance process; also, to develop clear pro- 
cesses of appointment, particularly as related to years spent else- 
where. He noted that Board action on a tenure policy at this time 
is most appropriate as evidence to the public and to other segments 
in higher education that the University "is capable of self-renewal 
and change . " 

The proposed policy has been reviewed by the Faculty 
Senate, UM/Amherst, and the University Assembly, UM/Boston. Comments 
have also been received from the recently appointed Academic Affairs 
Panel of the President's Office and from the Academic Committee of 
the President's Council, both of which are chaired by Father Walsh. 

The President stated that an implementation document will 
be submitted to the Committee after further refinement of certain 
areas by the campuses and his office. This will provide details on 
the planning, review, and appeals procedures. Consideration will 
also be given to specific concerns such as those raised by Acting 
Vice Chancellor Marshall at the September 22 meeting. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern reviewed discussion on the 
Amherst campus over the past year by the Deans Council, the Rules 
Committee of the Faculty Senate, and the Tenure and Grievance Commit 
tee culminating in the votes taken at the Senate on October 26. 



4011 



Tenure Policy 
Review 



4012 

F & EP Comm. 
11-15-72 



COMMITTEE 

Tenure Policy 
Review 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Tenure and Grievance Committee urged a flexible policy. It was 
not convinced of the negative effects of an increased tenure per- 
centage, but strongly supported the overall intent of the proposed, 
new policy. 

Chairman Troy pointed out changes between the original 
(Doc. T73-038 ) and the present (Doc. T73-069 ) draft policies: 
language changes in the third sentence, elimination of item 6 in the 
section on policies since this more appropriately will be in a 
document covering implementation, and removal of the word "negative" 
from the paragraph following that section; also, the addition of item 
4 in the direction section encouraging student participation in per- 
sonnel policy development. 

Trustee Shaler requested a report, department by department, 
of what is being done to insure student involvement in the entire 
academic process. Trustee Troy endorsed this request more specif ical|ly 
to include effectiveness of the present structure and how it might 
be extended. 

Trustee Ladd, referring to the report on tenure and person- 
nel policies of the Academic Affairs Committee of the Student Senate 
distributed to the Committee (Doc. T73-062 ) , noted that faculty mem- 
bers had not agreed to serve on the study committee. In addition, 
that committee has not yet received from the Faculty Senate a report 
on the degree of student participation in academic areas on the 
Amherst campus. They were also informed that the Tenure and Grievancb 
Committee of the Faculty Senate has not discussed student participatijn 
in personnel decisions. Mr. Ladd urged continued study of the relati un- 
ship of tenure policy to affirmative action. He endorsed item 4 
dealing with student participation in the direction section of the 
draft policy and said it should be developed more comprehensively in 
other documents, possibly using the affirmative action plan as a 
model. Referring again to problems encountered in attempts at stu- 
dent-faculty cooperation, Trustee Ladd stressed the need for special 
attention by the Academic Committee of the President's Council to 
implement item 4. 

Chairman Troy concurred with the campus representatives tha: 
difficulties can be anticipated in implementing the affirmative actio i 
program in relation to the tenure policy. He declared that persons 
appointed under that program should not assume that they will be 
granted tenure automatically. On a question from Trustee Abrams, Mr. 
Troy replied that tenure decisions are made at the end of the sixth 
year of service. If not granted, the person can remain for one more 
year. 

Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall summarized responses at 
UM/Boston from the College Personnel Committee, the Committee on 
Tenure and Grievance, and a number of senior faculty — while feeling 
that the draft statement was generally acceptable, questions were 
raised regarding different policies for different units, a mandatory 



I 



P 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

retirement age, future appointments with tenure, and the possibility 
of exploring alternate systems. Vice President Edelman noted that 
this type of question will be answered directly by the President's 
Office. President Wood requested that all suggestions for changes 
in the draft policy reach his office within the next few days. 

Chairman Troy remarked that, while the broad, general 
statement has been accepted by the campuses, specific procedures for 
its implementation are still in preparation. Dr. Shapiro urged that, 
in addition to procedures, there be an elaboration of the philosophy 
behind the policies. He mentioned specifically the policy state- 
ment's effect on departmental and college planning. President Wood 
explained that the intent of the policy is to encourage careful 
planning at the departmental level while avoiding an across-the-board 
University and campus quota on tenured faculty. 

Professor Weaver stressed that any limit becomes a quota 
and must be considered when recommending tenure within a department. 
Chairman Troy stated that the departments must be both "firm and 
flexible" and take a long-range view, not necessarily limited to a 
specific number, in structuring their faculty. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
adopt the policies and directives as outlined 
in Document T73-069 . 

The Committee then turned to the second agenda item, 
Sabbatical Leave Policy, UM/Amherst (Doc. T73-065 ) . Vice Chancellor 
Gluckstern noted that a number of questions have developed since the 
antinepotism policy (Doc. T64-037 ) was replaced with the conflict- 
of-interest policy (Doc. T72-029 ) . A number of wives have now 
received full-time appointments and would like credit toward a sab- 
batical for previous part-time service. Therefore, approval of two 
features is requested: (1) service credit for a person who has con- 
verted to full time and (2) service credit for a person who chooses 
to remain part time. In line with the direction of affirmative 
action for women, these changes are proposed for the Amherst campus 
and are being considered by the Boston campus for a University-wide 
sabbatical policy. Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall confirmed that 
UM/Boston has been concerned about the sabbatical policy for certain 
categories of faculty. Chairman Troy noted that the Board has tried 
to recognize all areas of service, referring to the action on 
August 10, 1970, making Instructors eligible. He said that the Com- 
mittee will take action on this matter at its next meeting. 

Trustee Ladd opened the Preliminary Discussion of the 
Rhetoric Requirement, UM/Amherst . He stated that he has supplied 
the Secretary's Office with material to be mailed to the Committee 
for its December meeting. The Student Senate is preparing a synopsis 
of the documents to facilitate review. Mr. Ladd expressed regret 
that it is necessary for the Trustees to mediate between the Faculty 



4013 



F & EP Comm. 
11-15-72 

Tenure Policy 
Review 



UM/Amherst — 

Sabbatical Leave 

Policy 

Doc. T73-065 



UM/Amherst — 
Preliminary 
Discussion of 
Rhetoric 
Requirement 



4014 

F & EP Comm. 
11-15-72 



UM/ Amherst — 
Preliminary 
Discussion of 
Requirement 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

and Student Senates rather than ratify a mutual recommendation (the 
Faculty Senate wishes to retain the rhetoric requirement; the Student 
Senate wishes to abolish it) . He recounted the history of previous 
reviews and changes and noted the concern of the Faculty Senate 
Academic Matters Committee that the poogHHrn was not meeting its 
objectives. Last spring, after an extensive evaluation by the Studen 
Senate Academic Affairs Committee, abolishment was voted and the 
matter taken to the Faculty Senate. Both bodies concur that facility 
with oral and written communication is a primary goal of the univer- 
sity experience; however, the actual value of retaining the require- 
ment was the issue debated. Mr. Ladd, noting defeat of the Academic 
Matters Committee's motion for abolishment, expressed doubt concern- 
ing the size of the majority vote. The major contention of the cur- 
riculum committees (of both Senates) doing the study is that the 
program, as it exists, "has not, does not, and will not" ever fulfill 
the objectives of the rhetoric course, in part because it is a requir 
ment. He stated that, in addition to the support material mentioned 
previously, an edited version of the Faculty Senate meeting of 
November 2, 1972, which was taped by the Student Senate, will be cir- 
culated. Chairman Troy questioned whether the Faculty and Educational 
Policy Committee's role should provide anything more than the basis 
of a forum for purposes of clarification. However, Trustee Ladd 
pointed out that abolishment of a requirement represents a curriculum 
change. This, he said, falls within the aegis of the Committee. 

Mr. Troy remonstrated that requests usually come through 
the regular academic channels. Mr. Apostola noted sharp differences 
between the report of the Academic Affairs Committee of the Student 
Senate and the report by the Rhetoric faculty and advocated that each 
group produce justification for its stand. Trustee Boyden urged an 
attempt at a mutual understanding at the campus level. Trustee 
Shaler questioned whether the Student Senate's exposition could con- 
vince the Trustees if it did not convince the Faculty Senate. Mr. 
Apostola replied that the faculty senators voting on November 2 were 
not representative of the usual attendance and that there seemed to 
be an underlying question of raising or lowering standards. The 
Student Senate's stand is that, as a required course, Rhetoric is 
overloaded with 4,000 freshmen and would be more valuable as an 
elective, more carefully structured course. 

Trustee Troy assured Mr. Apostola that the Committee will 
be interested in hearing all details when the agenda item appears . 
Vice Chancellor Gluckstern told the Committee that the Amherst adminis 
tration recognizes that the program needs substantial improvement anc 
that an open discussion would be useful. Chairman Troy proposed that 
speakers should be representative of each group and the intent will 
be to arrive at a mutual agreement for improvement of the present 
program. He reiterated that the Committee's role is to provide a 
vehicle through which the different bodies can come to an under- 
standing. He asked Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, Trustee Ladd, and 
Mr. Apostola to proceed with the necessary arrangements. 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Edelman proposed that the specific issue 
is related to the entire Freshman experience and suggested that the 
Committee should take an overall look. Mr. Troy concurred and com- 
mented, for instance, that granting six credits to entering students 
who demonstrate ability could tie in with a three-year degree. Dr. 
Hoopes assured Chairman Troy that faculty from the Rhetoric Program 
would have been present had they been aware the discussion was to 
start. 

Turning to the Proposed Inter-Institutional Agreement 
between the University of Massachusetts at Boston and the Hebrew Coll 



in Brookline (Doc. T73-061 ) , Acting Chancellor Hamilton referred the 
Committee to the material already distributed and added that he has 
recently received a letter from President Grad of the Hebrew College 
indicating that his Trustees have approved the agreement. The 
arrangement will be effective in February, 1973, and would provide 
students from either institution with access to additional course 
credits at no additional cost. It will meet the needs of (1) genera!, 
increased student interest at UM/Boston in religious studies and (2) 
language (particularly Classical) studies at the Hebrew College. 
Dean Marshall described the Hebrew College as an accredited school 
preparing teachers for Hebrew high schools. It has a library of 
about 70,000 volumes in the Judaic and Hebraic fields. She added 
that UM/Boston will accept the grade given by the Hebrew College 
for courses taken there. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize Acting Chancellor Hamilton to enter 
into an inter-institutional agreement between the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston and the 
Hebrew College of Brookline, as outlined in Doc. 
T73-061 . 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton then turned to the Proposal for 
a Graduate Program in Biology, UM/Boston (Doc. T73-063) . This 



Master's Degree Program was developed at the same time as the pro- 
grams already approved in English and Chemistry. It met the criteria 
set by President Wood at that time. While aware that the graduate 
programs at both UM/Amherst and UM/Boston are under study, the 
biology program is being recommended as deserving of consideration 
at this time. Professor Safwat, Chairman of the Joint Committees of 
the two Biology Departments, stated that the training of teachers 
will be a major goal of this interdisciplinary program. Biological 
principles will be examined at different levels. He remarked that 
the location of the Columbia Point campus lends itself to concen- 
tration on Marine Biology and noted various areas for ecological 
study and cooperative research. 

President Wood referred to his concern about (1) the need 
to look at the entire graduate picture at UM/Boston and UM/Worcester 
and (2) the need to create a "genuine university posture" regarding 



401 



o 



F & EP Comm. 
11-15-72 

UM/Amherst — 
Preliminary 
Discussion of 
Rhetoric 
Requirement 



UM/Boston — 
.ge?roposed Inter- 
Institutional 
Agreement 
Between UM/Boston 
and Hebrew 
College in 
Brookline 
Doc. T73-061 



UM/Boston — 
Proposal for 
Graduate Program 
in Biology 
Doc. T73-063 



4016 

F & EP Comm. 
11-15-72 

UM/Boston — 
Proposal for 
Graduate Program 
in Biology 

COMMITTEE 

Doc. T73-063 



UM/Worcester — 
Use of Title 
of Associate 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

graduate disciplines, particularly in the sciences and the relation- 
ship to graduate programs of other institutions, particularly the 
Boston area. While the President recommends approval of this pro- 
gram, he made it clear that no further requests should come to him 
until an overall plan for graduate programs is completed. He informe|d 
the Committee that, in terms of reports from Dean Soutter and Vice 
Chancellor Gluckstern, major new recommendations concerning graduate 
activities can be expected within the next six months. 

Father Walsh remarked that similar programs were being 
offered in area institutions raising some questions concerning the 
support material. He concluded that the relationship of this request 
to programs already approved had convinced him of its eligibility 
at this time. 

Professor Safwat informed Chairman Troy that there are 
about 350 students majoring in biology, of which about 50-60 are 
premed students. Professor Weaver spoke about cooperation with other 
departments, such as equipment purchases at Columbia Point and course 
structuring to avoid duplication. Vice Chancellor Hamilton commended 
the biology program as one of the finest at UM/Boston. He urged 
Committee approval. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve an M.S. Program in Biology (Doc. T73-063 ) . 

Chairman Troy confirmed that the remaining agenda item, 
Use of the Title of Associate at the Medical School , would not be 
considered at this meeting. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern assured Trustee Abrams that a 
study is in process regarding the preparation of minority-race stu- 
dents for admission to the Medical School. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:00 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretar 



r 



i 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

November 21, 1972; 10:15 a.m.; Bancroft Room, Sheraton-Lincoln Inn, 

RESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret, President 
food; Trustees Crowley, Ladd, Lambson, Rowland; Treasurer Johnson; 
Avs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Kelly 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Assistant 
Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion, 
Budget Director Gulko 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton 

The meeting was called to order by Chairman Pumphret at 
.0:15 a.m. 

Vice Chancellor Campion presented the request for a change 
Ln the Room Rent Refund Policy, UM/Amherst . On April 21, 1966, the 

Trustees had voted that room rents would not be refunded to any stu- 
lent who occupies his room, even for one night, except by reason of 
Involuntary entry into military service or extreme emergency. Vice 

Chancellor Gage and Associate Dean of Students Fitzpatrick now 
mcounter difficulty in the application of this policy, especially 

with definition of "extreme emergency." All other fees, except 

'lealth insurance, have a prorated refund schedule over the first five 

weeks of the academic semester. 

Trustee Ladd pointed out that students have protested the 

room rent refund policy and stated that Vice Chancellor Campion had 

aken this question to the Student Senate Rents and Fees Committee 

ind had received their support for the change. 

Vice Chancellor Campion said that the provision for a 
;roader range of exceptions in the proposed new policy still renders 
exempt the payment of a basic $100 minimum charge. He added that the 
demand for rooms would determine whether a vacancy was reassigned. 
Et is expected that approximately $8,000 a year would be refunded 
mder this new policy. 

On motion made and seconded* it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
following vote taken on April 21, 1966, be 
rescinded: "That the charges established by 
the foregoing votes shall not be refundable 



401? 



UM/Amherst — 

Room Rent Refund 

Policy 

Doc. T73-067 



4018 

Finance Comm, 
11-21-72 



UM/Amherst — 
Room Rent 
Refund Policy 
Doc. T73-067 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

to a student after he has occupied his assigned 
accommodation except upon certificate of the Dean 
of Students that such student has withdrawn from 
the University because of involuntary entry into 
military service or other reason of extreme 
emergency, the refund in such event to be the 
balance of the charge paid over that applicable 
to the period of actual occupancy plus one week." 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

student room rent refunds shall be refundable 
according to the following instructions: Any 
student who occupies his/her assigned accom- 
modations and subsequently leaves the University 
prior to the end of the first full class week 
shall automatically be charged a minimum of $100 
for his/her room. Any student who leaves the 
University during the second through fifth weeks 
shall be charged $100 plus 20% of the remaining 
balance for each week or part thereof. No 
refunds will be made after the fifth week of the 
academic semester. Refunds will be made during 
the refund period only to students who officially 
withdraw from the University through the 
Registrar's official withdrawal date. The Dean 
of Students' Office will be authorized to make 
exception to the above only for reasons of 
involuntary entry into military service or for 
reasons of "extreme emergency." Any exception 
made, however, shall not apply to the $100 minimum 
charge which shall be levied in all cases automatically 

Chairman Pumphret then requested confirmation of the 
Telephone Vote for Investment of the Endowment Fund (Doc. T73-066 ) . 



I 



» 



It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To confirm the vote taken by telephone on November 8, 
1972, to authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute changes in the Univer- 
sity's investment portfolio as recommended by 
Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., as follows: 

BUY: 200 Shares, American Cyanamid 
100 Shares, General Electric 
100 Shares , Honeywell 

Trustee Ladd stated that he had voted affirmatively in the 
absence of guidelines for placing investments with companies screened 
for ethical policies. He urged adoption of appropriate criteria. 



I 



I! 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Treasurer Johnson reported that most colleges and universities have 
such a policy and that he has been formulating one for the Univer- 
sity at the direction of President Wood. Also, he has talked with 
Messrs. Ladd and Wood, investment counselors, who have offered 
their cooperation in this area. He is also reviewing information 
from other sources. This subject will be discussed further at a 
later meeting of the Committee. 

Since parking meters will soon be operative on the Amherst 
campus, Vice Chancellor Campion requested the Committee to determine 
responsibility for setting the fees. On motion made and seconded, 
it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that 

they authorize the Chancellor, UM/Amherst, to 
establish parking meter rates for the Amherst 
campus . 

The meeting was adjourned at 10:45 a.m. 





Robert J/^McCartney 
SecrSary ./ Board of Trus 




4019 



Finance Comm. 
11-21-72 



UM/Amherst — 
Parking Meter 
Rates 



4020 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Constitutions 
Colleges I and II 
Doc. T73-070 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

November 21, 1972; 10:30 a.m.; Goddard Room, Sheraton-Lincoln Inn, 

Worcester, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 

Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret, Rowland, Troy, Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Croce, Crowley, Kelly, Ladd, Lambson, 
Maginnis, Shearer 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Ms. 
Robinson, Assistant Secretary Rawn, Ms. Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion, 
Budget Director Gulko 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall, Associate Provost Babcock; Professor 
Lyons, representing University Assembly 



The meeting began with discussion of the University of 
Massachusetts at Boston Constitutions for Colleges I and II (Doc, 



T73-070) . Acting Chancellor Hamilton said that the drafts had been 



drawn up about the same time as the University Assembly Constitution 
last spring. However, analysis and comment have been submitted by 
the President's Office. Revisions have resulted in emphasis on the 
authority of the Board of Trustees, the President, aid the Chancellor- 
as in the Constitution for the University Assembly. The two College 
Constitutions have been approved by large majorities of the faculty 
and students of each of the Colleges. 

President Wood reported that he had spoken before the UM/ 
Boston Assembly on the Wellman Report (Summer Study Group on Univer- 
sity Governance) . The general framework and outline is beginning to 
emerge. Dr. Wood added that UM/Boston knows that the provisions of 
the College Constitutions are subject to adjustment. Along with 
Acting Chancellor Hamilton, he recommends their adoption. Chairman 
Healey emphasized that he wished to insure the integration of the 
various constitutions at UM/Boston. 

Dr. Hamilton stated that the Constitutions are flexible at 
all levels. He reasoned that 95% of the problems arising from the 



documents will be internal in nature: 
colleges versus chancellor, etc. 



i.e. 



colleges versus assembly 



Trustee Pumphret questioned the provisions of paragraph 6, 
College I Constitution, which provides for faculty participation in 
the selection of Deans as well as a five-year review to make recom- 
mendations on the "appointment or reappointment of all persons holdin 



P 



) 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

najor administrative positions in College I." He noted a disparity, 
in that tenured faculty positions do not similarly come up for review 
every five years. 

Chairman Healey reminded the Committee that all incumbents 
in major administrative posts serve at the pleasure of the Board. 

Further, it was agreed that the Trustees do not wish to 
become involved with every detail of the new Constitutions. The 
Chairman does not see any need for review of tenured faculty. He 
noted also that the pan-university trend is to delegate as much 
selection authority as possible to the campuses. In summary, the 
Chairman is willing to approve the UM/Boston Constitutions for 
Colleges I and II with the understanding that, a year from now, they 
will be subject to further review by the Board. 

Trustee Troy queried whether control over admissions will 
be given to the individual Colleges and whether each will be free 
to develop its own admissions policy. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton responded that each college 
would recommend screening procedures for students interested in its 
particular kind of curriculum. College I might stress institutional 
studies, for example; College II might stress environmental studies. 
The admissions policy in each case would conform to the curriculum 
and goals of the College. Vice Chancellor Marshall added that each 
College has representation in the Admissions Office. The University 
Assembly has the responsibility to see that college policies are 
compatible with University policies. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve in principle the Constitutions of College 
I (Doc. T73-070A) and College II (Doc. T73-070B ) 
at the University of Massachusetts/Boston, subject 
to clarification, interpretation, and possible 
revision by the Trustees to be made after further 
study. 

President Wood introduced the item on Procedures Governing 
Appearances before the Board of Trustees (Doc. T73-071 ) . Dr. Wood 
reminded the Trustees that the President and Secretary hadlbeen 
requested, in the light of problems encountered last spring, to 
review and coordinate the development of a code of conduct for 
appearances before the Board of Trustees, along with appropriate 
revision of the Bylaws of the Board. Both projects have gone through 
several draft stages. Presentation of the Bylaws for approval is 
suspended until final agreement has been worked out on a related 
document, the provisions of the so-called Wellman Report (Pan-Univer- 
sity Summer Study Group on Governance). Nevertheless, President Wooc 
emphasized the importance of adopting the procedures document at 
this time. 



4021 



FiBxec* Comm. 
11-21-72 



UM/Boston — 
Constitutions 
Colleges I & II 
Doc. T73-070 



President 's 
Comments — 
Appearances Before 
Board of Trustees 
Doc. T73-071 



4022 

Exec. Comm. 
11-21-72 



President's 
Office — 
Appearances 
Before Board 
of Trustees 

COMMITTEE 

Doc. T73-071 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The new procedures make clear how agendas are formulated 
and how to arrange for an appearance before the Trustees. The 
general operation of meetings is clarified. Dr. Wood noted that the 
concept of a campus liaison committee as a referral group for 
screening certain agenda items had originated with Chairman Healey. 

Secretary McCartney stated that the proposed procedures 
were based on recommendations from several sources including a com- 
mittee headed by Acting Chancellor Hamilton of UM/Boston. Sug- 
gestions were made also by Professor Patterson in the President's 
Office, by Assistant Secretary Rawn, and by himself. 

The Secretary recommended that the proposed procedures be 
adopted as the official Board policy document. It is possible that 
an abbreviated version may be prepared in print to hand out to 
students, faculty members and others at future Trustee meetings. 

Trustee Kelly felt that the proposal was too rigid. Trustee 
Ladd pointed out that persons having serious intent to disrupt a 
meeting would pay no attention to this or any other document on pro- 
tocol. He said he supported the procedures so long as they were 
given wide distribution on the campuses and so long as the Chairman 
conducted the meeting with certain flexibility. President Wood 
observed that the Board has always been flexible in emergencies. 
At the same time, he is anxious to facilitate the work of the 
Secretary in such situations. 

Chairman Healey said that he wanted a set of operational 
rules for the conduct of meetings. He reinforced the fact that the 
Board of Trustees is a policy board operating in a legislative 
manner, and not involved in the operational details of the campuses. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton said that his committee had 
been concerned that the Board, during certain periods last winter 
and spring, was not able to conduct its regular business. Concern 
was also expressed that students and faculty members went directly 
to the Board, rather than first exhausting all campus administrative 
procedures. 

The Chairman observed that many problems which heretofore 
came to the Board should have been addressed instead to administrators , 

Professor Lyons felt that there was some confusion about 
the status of the proposed Liaison Committee. Much of its responsi- 
bility, he said, remains undefined. Chairman Healey replied that 
the Committee is intended to work with groups who wish to present 
issues to the Board. In one sense, therefore, the Liaison group is 
a procedural committee. Secretary McCartney added that another 
responsibility of the Liaison Committee will be to determine whether 
or not all opportunities for settlement of an issue have been 
exhausted on the campus where the problem has arisen. Yet another 
role, Mr. Healey said, is to make certain that any presentation to 
the Trustees will be properly balanced, as was the ROTC issue last 
spring. In summary, the Chairman reiterated that the Board of 



I 



COMMITTEE 



4023 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustees is a policy board and should entertain reviews of operational 
problems only where such review is compelled by law. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

Procedures Governing Appearances before the Board 

of Trustees (Doc. T73-071 ) be adopted and placed into 

effect as of November 21, 1972. 

At the request of the Chairman, it was then moved, seconded 

ind 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose o£ 
giving final consideration to the nominees for 
honorary degrees to be awarded at UM/Amherst 
Commencement in May, 1973. 

After appropriate review and consideration, it was moved, 
econded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of ad j ournment . 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:40 p.m. 



I 





<obert J . /MdOar'tney" 
Secretary(^/Board of Trustees 




Exec, Comm. 
11-21-72 



4024 



COMMITTEE 



Introduction 
and Background 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF AD HOC COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY/COMMUNITY RELATIONS 
November 28, 1972; 8:00 p.m.; Dorchester Field Office 
932 Dorchester Avenue 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Snowden, President 
Wood; Trustees Shearer, Kelly, Pumphret, Gordon, Crowley 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Secretary's Office : Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Messrs. Getson and 
Williams 

Members of the Dorchester-Columbia Point Task Force : 
Joan Matthews (Dorchester Tenants Action Council) , Jim 
Mallen (Fields Corner Neighborhood Association) , Ira Arlook 
(The People First) , Suzin Bartley (Uphams Corner Health 
Center) , Donna Finn (The People First) , John Longo (Jones 
Hill Civic Association) , Margaret Mitchell (Jones Hill 
Civic Association) , Peg Moran (Columbia-Savin Hill Civic 
Association & Little House) , Sam Mullin (Columbia-Savin 
Hill, UMass Field Office), Harold Springer (Columbia Point, 
UMass Field Office, Director), Tom Was s (Columbia-Savin 
Hill Civic Association) 

Justin Gray Associates : Mr. Justin Gray, Ms. Ellen 
Feingold, Ms. Cathy Donaher 

Also : Two UM/Boston students who live in the Dorchester 
area. 



Chairman Snowden called the meeting to order at 8:30 p.m. 
After everyone introduced themselves, Jim Mallen set forth the back- 
ground and history of the Dorchester-Columbia Point Task Force (see 
list of members in Document T73-081) , and the nature of the study by 
Justin Gray Associates. He felt that the purpose of this meeting was 
to inform the Trustees about both the progress made to date and the 
issues currently being raised. He asked the Trustees to please help 
because together the University and the community could make certain 
decisions which would be beneficial to both. He complimented the 
Boston campus personnel for their hard work and assistance during the 
past two years. Mrs. Snowden then introduced the Trustee view of the 
role of the Ad Hoc Committee on University/Community Relations. Its 
primary purpose is to relay to the full Board accurate information 
regarding the University's impact on the South Boston-Dorchester 
neighborhoods. She hopes to get first-hand information, to relay 
this information to the Trustees, and when appropriate, to make recom- 
mendations to the Trustees regarding various points of agreement 
reached with the community. She wants the University to become a 
"part of the team" and to become an asset to the community. She 
urged that at this meeting and at future meetings everyone should 
feel free to talk, to be relaxed, to be informal and to get to know 
one another. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



4025 

Ad Hoc Coram, on 
Univ. /Comm. 



Columbia Point 
Project 



Ms. Myers, from Columbia Point, then set forth the problems Relations 
that were facing the residents of the Columbia Point Housing Project. 
She set forth the present situation, anticipated problems, and some 
possibilities for solution. The primary fear among Columbia Point 
residents is that the University may try to reorganize Columbia Point 
once again. She said that there are many rumors that the University 
might take over the project and move in students. Trustee Pumphret 
questioned some of her assumptions and her claims about the University 
demands, and he suggested that the Board might consider making a 
statement somewhat similar to the one it made about Boston College 
High School: stating that it had no intentions to take over the 
housing project. Trustee Crowley added that the University really 
has no intentions to build dormitories generally. Mrs. Snowden felt 
that if rumors are the problem, the University might consider running 
a rumor clinic out of its offices so that any rumors could be checked 
out and corrected if necessary. 

Trustee Shearer pointed out that a joint statement on 
Columbia Point might be necessary. Such a joint statement would not 
only include the community and the University but also other city and 
state institutions involved, particularly the housing authority. She 
also raised a real problem: Who really speaks for the University? 
With what authority? She thinks the whole University has to gain 
credibility with the community and it has to be made clear who is 
speaking for the University. President Wood pointed out that the real 
voice, of course, is the Trustees. Mrs. Shearer added that all parties 
should see these problems in very human terms. The University should 
understand what relocation is all about and its real life effects on 
displaced people. "Numbers alone do not tell the story; families are 
displaced and uprooted. That is the important thing." With regard to the 
Columbia Point Project, Ms. Myers pointed out that students are 
eligible for public housing and that white students would be encouraged 
because the Housing Authority is trying to keep some sort of racial 
balance. Though there is a waiting list for large black families, 
whites would automatically be placed in the project. In addition, 
there are some 200 vacant small units which would be available 
immediately. Justin Gray thought that the University could join with 
project residents to urge that improvements be made in the project. 



Joan Matthews, Chairwoman of the Task Force, next presented Housing 
information on the housing situation. She included a set of adver- 
tisements (Doc. T73-082 ) selling properties near the new campus. She 
would like to see no subdivisions of property in the area and she 
pointed out that the housing crisis facing Dorchester is a fact now 
and not someone's fantasy. Mrs. Matthews documented cases on fam- 
ilies, either black or white, which were turned down for empty apart- 
ments because real estate brokers were looking for students. Then 
people disguised as students would come to the same brokers and the 
apartments would be readily available. She said this is happening all 
around Fields Corner and Savin Hill. Ms. Feingold pointed out that 
their preliminary figures show that 40% of the students are not living 
at home with their parents. The fear is that most of the 40% would 
move to the Dorchester area. Already, 14% of the students at 
UM/Boston live in Dorchester. 



(DOC. T73-082) 



4026 

11-28-72 

Ad Hoc Coram, on 

Univ. /Coram. 

Relations 

Jobs 



COMMITTEE 



Transportation 



(DOC. T73-083) 



Education 
Policy 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Next Jim Mallen talked about jobs. Besides some hiring 
problems and recruitment, he pointed out the need for "contract set 
asides", the creation of a small contractual unit capable of being 
bid upon by community people. An example of this would be custodial 
services. A large contractor could get the bid for the whole project 
However, if the University "set aside" certain smaller parts of the 
campus for other custodial contracts, then community people could 
set up businesses and bid on those jobs. 

Donna Finn discussed the transportation system. She 
pointed to the myth of a commuter campus in a sense that if many 
students live in an area and many others drive through the area, 
whether it is a commuter campus or not , it is going to have a pro- 
found transportation effect on the community. The MBTA has not been 
very helpful. She said that some Boston officials talk of traffic 
lights and a huge traffic backup at Neponset Circle as remedying the 
traffic problem along Morrissey Boulevard. She handed out some 
materials (Doc. T7 3-083 ) which show the locations and dates of 
various city and state projects being considered for the area. Many 
of the bridge building arid underpass building projects will have 
large-scale transportation effects on the area within the next four 
or five years. There is also the fear that Old Colony Road in Savin 
Hill will be used as an alternative road to get to the campus, 
thereby destroying one neighborhood of Savin Hill. There are also 
fears about large amounts of traffic on Mount Vernon Street with the 
attendant dangers to children. As Acting Chancellor Hamilton pointed 
out, if the transportation problems are not solved, there will be an 
increase in pressure on housing. Local businesses, especially the 
Boston Globe, are worried about the transportation impact. Trustee 
Pumphret emphasized that he agreed this is a terrible problem and 
needs solution. 

In a general statement, President Wood pointed out that it 
would be most helpful to identify those issues on which the Univer- 
sity can have an impact and to identify those issues that are beyond 
the control of the University in which the University and the com- 
munity can be partners. Transportation, of course, is a major 
issue in the latter category. 

Ms. Matthews added that, based on interviews with students 
traditional dormitories will not solve most of these problems. 

Next Ms. Mitchell discussed education policy, particularly 
enrollment and admissions. She pointed out that as more students 
come to Columbia Point from outside Boston, the impact on housing 
will be great. For instance, a student from Newton or Braintree or 
Danvers is more likely to live in the Dorchester neighborhood than 
the student who comes from South Boston or Mattapan. Therefore, 
there should be a definite policy to encourage local Boston students 
to come to the University. Because many Boston students are not 
fully prepared for college, compensatory programs should be estab- 
lished (e.g., a 13th year program). Mrs. Snowden echoed this and 
pointed out that everyone, the community and the University, should 
get together to try to do something about the Boston school system. 
Greater outreach programs should be created. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton pointed out that higher tuition 
costs would place even greater pressure on these other community pro- 
blems because it will effect the Boston-suburban mix of students at 
the University. 

Ira Arlook then set forth recommendations with a summary of 
the issues facing the community and the University. The basic issues 
are housing, educational policy, transportation, and jobs. Follow- 
ing is an outline of his presentation: 

I. Housing 

A. Columbia Point Project - to make it a more 
livable environment. There should be a 
joint effort by the University and community 
to make funds available for this purpose. 

B. Dorchester Area 

1. Enforcement of codes by the city. This 
takes joint efforts by the community and 
University to get the city to enforce 
codes already on the books . 

2. Develop attractive student housing, probably 
desirable on University property, though not 
dormitory in the traditional sense. This 
might involve a joint effort on legislation. 
One piece of the legislation might be the 
state's financial assistance for the incre- 
mental costs of site preparation at Columbia 
Point location (such extra site preparation 
costs including deeper pilings and added 
acoustical requirements). 



II. 



Educational Policy 

A. Possibly limit enrollment to 10,000. 

B. Use University experience to help improve the Boston 
city schools. 

C. Do something to stop the irrevocable trend towards 
making Boston schools students less and less able 
to attend the University. 

III. Transportation 

A. Admit that there is no short-term solution to the 
transportation problem and try to alleviate the 
problems as best possible. 

B. With regard to long-term solutions, continue 
discussions with Secretary of Transportation 
Altshuler . 



402? 



11-28-72 

Ad Hoc Comm. on 

Univ. /Comm. 

Relations 

Education Policy 



Summary and 
Recommendations 



4028 

11-28-72 

Ad Hoc Comm. on 

Comm. /Univ. 

Relations 

Summmary and 
Recommendations 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

C. The real impact of transportation is not so 
much the inconvenience to all involved as the 
fact that bad transportation will lead to 
more student demands for housing near the campus. 

IV. Jobs 

A. Create better job training programs. 

B. Create "contract set asides" for the community. 

Trustee Pumphret pointed out that if the University limits 
enrollment just to Boston residents, it will lose some .of its power 
in the legislature. At the same time, Trustee Pumphret emphasized 
that the community has the right to demand of the University and others 
a definite timetable for the solution of the admittedly overwhelming 
transportation problems in the area. Ms. Feingold pointed out that 
the Task Force had originally planned to concentrate on the housing 
study but it found that these other problems had direct impact on 
lousing. That is why they are being considered. Mr. Arlook 
emphasized that fears regarding enrollment are not about students froiji 
the inner suburbs (e.g., Chelsea, Revere, Cambridge) but students 
Erom the outer suburbs who can afford Dorchester housing and there- 
fore, will move rather than commute from home. He pointed out that 
lousing which could be built in the community on vacant lots and with-- 
Ln existing zoning laws would cover only about 1/3 of the anticipated 
lemand. In addition, such new housing on vacant property would meet 
opposition from many neighborhood groups. So housing at the site may 
:>e part. of the solution. 

Everyone agreed that the meeting had been very helpful and 
:hat dialogue should continue. The Ad Hoc Committee will wait for 
:he Justin Gray Task Force report and its formal recommendations. 
After that, further meetings would be in order. 



The meeting was adjourned at 10:10 p.m. 




William L. Rawn, III 

Assistant Secretary, Board of Trustees 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

December 11, 1972; 3:00 p.m.; Room 406, 100 Arlington St., Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : 

Chairman Rowland; Trustees Boyden, Croce, Kelly, Shaler, 
Shearer, Snowden, Assistant Secretary Rawn, Ms. Pugh, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton; Mr. Tim Williams, 
Assistant to the Acting Chancellor; Mr. Primo Vannicelli, 
Associate Dean, College II; Gerald Sullivan, Associate 
Dean, College I; Gardner Yenawine, Director of Placement 
and Vocational Counseling 

UM/Boston Students : Toby Pearlstein, Reggie Cagle, Paul 
Tooher, Jim Arsenault, Robert Tynes, Richard Riley, Paul 
Flaherty, Larry Fitch, Peter Kadzis,aid other students 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 3:10 p.m. Acting 
Chancellor Hamilton welcomed the Student Activities Committee to the 
Boston campus. 

Mrs . Rowland noted that her Committee was concerned with 
developing policy rather than getting involved in the actual imple- 
mentation of the policy. The Chairman explained that the reason 
the Committee was meeting on the Boston campus was to hear first- 
hand from the students what their concerns were and how the Trustees 
could help them. Mrs. Rowland then called on Trustee Kelly, from the 
Boston campus. 

Ms. Kelly explained to the Trustees that she had invited 
student representatives from both College I and College II. As was 
listed in the agenda (previously distributed to the Committee) there 
were 10 students who would speak on various areas of student concern 
at the Boston campus. Ms. Kelly introduced the first speaker, Ms. 
Toby Pearlstein, Co-chairman of the University Assembly. 

Ms. Pearlstein briefly described the governance system at 
the Boston campus. She explained that there was a University Assembler 
made up of students, faculty, and staff from both College I and 
College II with a total of 46 senators. The Assembly is concerned 
with matters that are University-wide. Each College, however, has 
their own governing body; for College I, there is the Executive Com- 
mission of the College, and for College II, the Senate. According 
to Ms. Pearlstein, the philosophy of campus governance is that most 
decisions are made at the College level. The University Assembly 
watches over the Colleges in order that decisions made are consistent 
with University-wide policies. Ms. Pearlstein also pointed out thre 



4029 



UM/ Bos ton- 
Governance 



4030 



12-11-72 

Stu. Act. Comm. 

UM/Boston — 
Governance 



COMMITTEE 

UM/Boston — 
MASS MEDIA 



UM/Boston — 
Community Action 
Committee 



UM/Boston — 
Student 
Activities 
Committee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

interesting aspects of the Boston campus governance: (1) all con- 
stituents of the University community were represented in the govern 
ing bodies, (2) a very high number of women are involved in campus 
governance, and (3) there is an extremely wide range of opinions 
represented on the campus governance bodies. 

The next speaker, Mr. Tooher, editor of the MASS MEDIA , 
pointed out three major functions of the campus media: (1) it is the 
major means of communication on campus, (2) it is an educational 
activity, and (3) it is a social activity for students. Mr. Tooher 
explained that the primary source of funding was from the student 
activities trust fund (with a small proportion from advertising). 
He also said he hoped the funding would eventually allow the MASS 
MEDIA to become independent. With the opening of the Columbia Point 
campus, many questions face the staff on the future direction of the 
paper such as: (1) the possibility of two editions, (2) becoming a 
daily, and (3) how to bast communicate all facets of the University 
to the community. 

The next student introduced was Mr. Reggie Cagle, Chairman 
of the Community Action Committee. He explained that the Community 
Action was primarily involved with tutoring programs. At this time, 
approximately 50 students are working the Dorchester House Tutoring 
Program, both a tutoring program as well as something like a big 
brother program. There are three other programs in operation in 
Chinatown, in Norfolk Prison, and Columbia Point. Mr. Cagle 
reported that the Community Action Program has received wide support 
including the Chancellor's Office and the Student Activities Commit- 
tee. According to Mr. Cagle, the budget last year was $1,400 and 
has been increased this year to $20,000. He explained that the 
group is very interested in expanding and improving the various pro- 
grams that have been taking place at the present time. Mr. Cagle 
submitted a report on the Community Action Program for distribution 
to the Committee. 

Ms. Kelly then introduced Mr. Paul Flaherty, a member of 
Students for a Democratic Society, who spoke on community relations 
at Columbia Point. Mr. Flaherty explained that his organization 
was very concerned about the University's move to the new campus. In 
his opinion, the University should build housing at the Boston campus 

Mr. Robert Tynes , a member of the Student Activities Commit 
tee of the University Assembly, spoke on the present status of his 
committee. He feels that most of the students on the campus are not 
aware of the existence of this committee. He explained that there 
is a current controversy over the student activities tax. An 
investigation committee of the University Assembly has been estab- 
lished to examine new procedures for approving allocations of funds 
and exploring alternatives to the tax. Mr. Tynes feels that the 
student activities committee is not able to meet the needs of the 
students. He hopes that the investigatory committee will come up 
with some good alternatives that will be beneficial to the entire 
campus. The real question is whether more students should be 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

involved in the determination or application of the student activitie 
tax fund. At this point, Mr. Richard Riley, Chairman of the Invest- 
igation Committee, was introduced. He stated that his committee was 
concerned in increasing student input in the allocation of funds. He 
also explained that the charge to his committee is to look into the 
problems of the Student Activities Committee, to review how to 
improve the quality of life at the Boston campus, and to present a 
paper on the structure of a student activities committee. Perhaps 
one of the recommendations coming forth from his committee would be 
the reduction of the student activities tax. This would, of course, 
come before the Board of Trustees at the proper time. 

A presentation was made on the student problem center by 
Mr. Jim Arsenault, a student member of the center's staff. He 
explained that the student problem center has three functions: (1) 
as a drop-in center, (2) as a referral agency (he informed the Com- 
mittee that the student problem center had collected over 10,000 
names of different services available in the Boston area) , and (3) 
as a place where students can come with a wide variety of problems. 
He explained that the center is staffed by students who attend 
training sessions at least once a week at the center. 

General discussion followed. In response to a question on 
funding of the center, Acting Chancellor Hamilton explained that it 
is a mixed-bag with funds from the health services, from a special 
grant by the Chancellor's Office, and from the student activities 
trust fund. Trustee Croce questioned whether there are follow-ups 
on students who have been referred to various agencies. Mr. 
Arsenault explained that confidential files are kept on referrals. 
In response to another question from Trustee Shaler, Mr. Arsenault 
explained that there was one full-time staff person at the center, 
a director, but the remainder of the staff are student counselors. 
Another question raised was the possibility of decentralization of 
the center — perhaps it would be more inviting and easily accessible 
within the Colleges. Chairman Rowland questioned if there were pro- 
fessional people who volunteer their time. The response was yes. 
Mr. Arsenault also reported that in his opinion approximately 20% of 
the students use the center on a continuing basis. Trustee Snowden 
inquired as to the relationship between the volunteer staff who come 
to the center and the center itself, i.e., is it just on an indivi- 
dual basis or is there any relationship with the agencies involved? 
Mr. Arsenault explained that there is no formal relationship. 
Trustee Croce reported that many speakers from various agencies in 
the community volunteer their time. He offered to help the center 
in setting up programs with various agencies if desired. 

At the conclusion of these presentations, Chairman Rowland 
inquired about the status of counseling and advising at the Boston 
campus. She explained that her Committee had worked over the past 
year investigating student support services at both campuses by estab - 
lishing a pan-campus working group directed by Vice Chancellor Gage 
(UM/ Amherst) . The Board of Trustees adopted a policy statement on 
counseling, advising, and support services as a result of these effor 



4031 



Stud, Act. Comm. 
12-11-72 

UM/Boston — 
Student Activities 
Committee 



UM/Boston — 
Student Problem 
Center 



4032 

Student Act. 
12-11-72 



Com 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Gardner Yenawlne, Director of Placement and Vocational 
Counseling, at the University, suggested that the campus was working 
on the improvement of coordination between advising and counseling 
offices. The advising program is in a state of change. 

Trustee Shaler raised a concern about the status of the 
recommendations of the Gage report. Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
explained that they have a continuing problem with funding. Some of 
the recommendations like coordination between various services (i.e., 
special admissions, financial aid, admissions) were being adopted. 
He said that the critical area is advising. 

Trustee Snowden noted that the original cause for concern 
with counseling, advising and support services came from black stu- 
dents at the Boston campus. She inquired about the use of the pro- 
blem center by black students. Mr. Cagle responded that black stu- 
dents donnot make as much use of the center. He felt that the black 
students find out where they can get help- and go there. Acting Chan- 
cellor Hamilton agreed that it was his understanding that black stu- 
dents go to whomever they know will help. Mr. Cagle explained that 
black students do not necessarily avoid the services, but they have 
had unsatisfactory past experiences with the white staff. Mr. Shaler 
inquired about attempts to bring more black administrators and 
counselors onto the campus. In response, Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
explained that funds were limited. Mr. Sullivan also mentioned that 
positions have been requested for more people in the advising and 
counseling areas since 1968. 

Chairman Rowland expressed concern about the physical 
location of student support services on the new campus at Columbia 
Point. Acting Chancellor Hamilton pointed out that this matter was 
under consideration and that all the services may eventually be house 
in Building 080/2 (now in the planning stages). But until that time, 
some of the services will be in the administration building while 
others will be located in the colleges. 

Discussion followed on the subject of centralization versus 
decentralization of student services. Some people expressed concern 
that the needs of the Boston campus are much greater than the UM/ 
Amherst campus because of its nonresidential nature. There should be 
a relationship between Boston campus and the various community 
agencies. The question of increasing the University's own support 
services or increasing the cooperative effort between various agenciejs 
in the community and the University is one that concerns everyone. 

Trustee Snowden feels there is pressing need for an inter- 
change of University and community resources. It was pointed out, 
that last year the University Assembly debated these issues when 
faced with an increase in the student health fee. Mr. Tooher 
explained that he felt there was a need for improved communication on 
the availability of resources at the Boston campus. Acting Chancello|r 
Hamilton suggested that there was a need to look at the comparative 
situations such as New York University, Boston University, and other 
urban universities. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In concluding the meeting, Mrs. Rowland explained that she 
felt channels of communication should always be open between the 
Board of Trustees and the students, faculty, and staff. She noted 
the accessibility of theTrustees and their willingness to hear con- 
cerns of the students. She stated that she would like to see more 
novement in the direction recommended by the Gage committee. She 
suggested that a report on the status of counseling, advising and 
support services at the Boston campus be submitted to the Trustees 
Ln March. 

Trustee Croce expressed concern that as the financial 
picture was not looking favorable for the next few years, and that 
positions which are needed may not be available, that the help of out- 
side resources is extremely necessary. He suggested that perhaps 
some of the agencies on the outside would be interested in setting up 
branch offices on the campus. 

Trustee Snowden stated that the campus must be sensitive to 
the various needs of students at the campus. In response, Mr. Cagle 
explained that the black students are not as involved in the governance 
process. He stated that if the University accepts students, the 
University should accept the responsibility for helping these stu- 
dents. Mr. Cagle also pointed out that academic services are not 
meeting the needs of the students, specifically, the needs of minority 
students. It was also suggested by Mr. Primo Vannicelli that there 
is a need to involve faculty members to assist in the academic 
advising of students. He suggested that the rewarding of faculty 
members for active participation with student counseling should be a 
question that the Trustees face. 

In response Trustee Rowland explained that this matter is 
more appropriately the concern of Trustee Committee on Faculty and 
Educational Policy chaired by Trustee Troy. She would inform him of 
the concerns and suggestions made to this Committee. 

Mrs. Rowland thanked everyone for attending and said she 
looks forward to more of these informal meetings with students. 

The meeting was adjourned at 5:00 p.m. 



4033 



Student Act. Com. 
12-11-73 




William L. Rawn, III 

Assistant Secretary, Board of TruBtee 



4034 



COMMITTEE 



Proposed State- 
ment on Gover- 
nance by the Pan- 
University Study 
Group for Review 
of University 
Governance Pro- 
cedures 

(DOC. T73-092 & 
DOC. T73-098) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 16, 1973; 2:00 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 

Wood; Trustees. Gordon, Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer 
Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Knowles 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Assistant Secretary Rawn, Univer- 
sity Counsel Searson, Staff Associate Kaplan, Ms. Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gluckstern; Prof. Burke, rep. 
Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton; Prof. Lyons, faculty 
rep. 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Pan-University Study Group on Governance : Prof . Wellman 
(UM/A), Chairman; Profs. Burroughs (UM/A) , Broderick, (pM/B) 
Brown (UM/B) 

Chairman Healey convened the meeting at 2:10 p.m. 

Before considering the agenda, the Committee agreed with 
Trustee Rowland that the Board receives much miscellaneous material 
through the mail from outside sources. However, the Trustees are 
ilso aware that lists of their names and addresses are available as 
public information. There appears to be no practical solution to this 
problem except to ignore or discard items which are irrelevant. 

President Wood reviewed the agenda items and noted that somt 
rould be considered in executive session. He requested that the Pro- 
posed Statement by the Pan-University Study Group for Review of Univer 



sity Governance Procedures be considered first, 



Prof. Robert Wellman, UM/ Amherst, Chairman of the Study 
roup, remarked that the project had been authorized by vote of the 
3oard at the June 28, 1972, meeting. Work sessions have been held 
luring the summer and fall. Trustees Healey and Knowles along with 
President Wood, members of his staff, and faculty and students of UM/ 
Amherst and UM/Boston have all been involved. A second revision of 
;he Governance Statement working draft (DOC. T73-092) was mailed to 
:he Executive Committee; a third revision (DOC. T73-098) with minor 
:hanges was distributed at this meeting. Every effort is being made 
;o produce a policy acceptable to the individual campuses as well as 
:o the University administration. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



J 



1 



4035 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey said he had participated actively in dis- 
cussions leading to the current draft. He noted difficulties in both 
philosophy and drafting approach as the project developed. Paragraph 
35 is particularly sensitive. The Chairman commended the Study Group 
and gave his personal endorsement to the overall statement. 

Mr. Wellman responded that Paragraph 35 outlines campus and 
administrative responsibilities, specifically reserving the attention 
of the Trustees and the President's Office for major issues. He 
emphasized that the 70-day "tacit-approval provision" is a terminal 
procedure. It occurs at the end of the chain, following active com- 
munication among all concerned regarding the particular issue at hand 



Responding to a question from Trustee Troy, Mr. Sears on 
indicated that Paragraphs 16, 23, and 29 are similar in that they 
provide nominations to the positions of President, Chancellor, and 
Vice Chancellor by search committees, but leave the actual appointment 
to the Trustees, the President, and the Chancellor, respectively. 
Counsel did not object to the words, "will seek nominations from a 
search committee," on the grounds that this language would not infringe 
the authority of the Board of Trustees to seek nominations from 
sources other than the search committee and, therefore, such language 
would not be an improper delegation of authority under Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 75, Section 3a. Mr. Searson made the same 
representation with reference to Paragraphs 23 and 29 which also deal 
with search committees . 

Professor Broderick of the Study Group assured the Committe 
that the assumption throughout the document was that the Trustees 
would be involved along with the faculties in many areas where they 
had not been previously involved. Mr. Wellman added that the Trustee 
could be represented on all search committees. 

Chairman Healey pointed out that the Governance Statement 
cannot outline specific situations; questions will inevitably arise 
at the time actual selections to key posts are being made. It does 
propose that the Trustees withdraw from making direct decisions in 
all personnel selections except that of a President. Prof. Lyons, 
UM/Boston, confirmed that the statement under consideration is in 
harmony with the Constitutions already approved in principle for the 
University Assembly and Colleges I and II. 

Concern was expressed by Trustee Rowland that the wording 
of certain paragraphs (13, 14, 15) placed the Board in a negative 
or reactive position. University Counsel Searson and Prof. Wellman 
assured her that other paragraphs (1, 9) protect the initiatory 
powers of the Board. 

Several Trustees concurred that the Board should retain the 
authority to appoint the Chancellors and the Dean of the Medical 
School. Prof. Wellman again pointed out that Trustees may serve on 
the search committees and that the proposed procedure was intended to 
relieve the full Board from the responsibility of interviewing each 



1-16-73 
Exec . Comm . 

Proposed State- 
ment on Gover- 
nance by Pan- 
University 
Study Group 
(DOC. T73-092, 
DOC. T73-098) 



4036 

Exec. Comm. 
1-16-73 



Proposed State- 
ment on Gover- 
nance by Pan- 
University Study 
Group 

COMMITTEE 



(DOC. 

DOC. 



T73-092, 
T73-098) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

nominee. However, Trustee Troy noted that the term of a President 
might not be synchronous with that of the Chancellors and Dean, and 
that the Board has an obligation to a new President in this area. 

Trustee Gordon stated that the President should be expected 
to exert strong influence in the selection of a Chancellor. 

Trustee Knowles described the Board as a "buffer state" 
between the University and the state (students, faculty, taxpayers, 
etc.) and agreed that the Board should retain the responsibility for 
appointing the Chancellors and the Dean. Trustee Pumphret concurred. 
He added that he did not object to delegating other powers to the 
President. 

Professor Brown commented that the President may prefer to 
restrict his delegation of appointment powers to Chancellors if he 
does not directly appoint them. Professor Wellman said that the 
Study Group did not conceive of the President making an appointment 
unacceptable to the Board. 

Treasurer Johnson pointed out that the governance statement 
covers many areas already documented. For example, Document T71-115 
delegates certain powers to the President. Will the governance 
statement automatically supercede other policies and procedures? 
Chairman Healey replied that it would be the overriding document, 
but that its effect on prior votes of the Board should be carefully 
reviewed. He emphasized that the Board should concern itself prim- 
arily with policies. Professor Wellman added that the Study Group 
had reviewed a number of policy statements and was not aware of any 
direct conflicts. 

Trustee Rowland noted her basic agreement with Chairman 
Healey that the Board should deal with important academic goals and 
policies. She inquired about immediate areas of concern. Professor 
Broderick replied that the Board has never formally stated its 
position on the Future University Report although some of its recom- 
mendations are being applied throughout the University. 

Dean Soutter proposed that one or two Trustees investigate 
annually and in turn the various schools of the University (for 
instance, the School of Education) and report back to the Board. 
Trustee Troy noted that he had requested a report on the School of 
Education more than a year ago. Trustee Rowland commented that she 
had read extensively in the newspapers about recent problems at the 
School of Education, but had received no report from the University. 
She agreed with Mr. Troy that an evaluation of that school would be 
helpful. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern noted that Chancellor Bromery 
is preparing a report of the recent admissions problems at the 
School of Education. 

Trustee Knowles, before leaving the meeting, commended the 
Study Group for its work on the statement, particularly in the area 
of the budget. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Lyons said he felt that the Board, if freed from 
routine matters, could become a very potent force. He declared that 
the proposed statement is designed to enhance the position of the 
Board which must itself define areas and levels of responsibility. 
Trustee Gordon noted that the recent creation of a University admin- 
istration office provides personnel ready to assume management 
responsibilities previously handled by the Board. 

Chairman Healey expressed concern that the Committee now 
has serious reservations about certain sections of the governance 
statement. Professor Wellman stated that today's preliminary dis- 
cussion with the Committee has been very informative. Further dis- 
cussions will continue with various campus groups. He will review 
the suggestions made today along with any others coming from other 
sources and submit a fourth revision of the statement to the Trustees 

In response to a question on the Bylaws revision, Secretary 
McCartney replied that the final draft is being held pending action 
on the governance statement which calls for the establishment of two 
new Board committees. If this is approved, the Bylaws will be con- 
formed to include them. They will then be ready for Board review and 
adoption. 

Professor Wellman recommended that the writing committee of 
the Study Group meet with small groups of Trustees before the propose i 
statement goes to the campus governing bodies. He noted that a meet- 
ing with Trustee Knowles earlier today had been very helpful. The 
Study Group is anxious to articulate policies and procedures with 
which the administration and the campuses feel comfortable. 

Trustee Rowland urged that the entire Board be involved in 
the review process at this time. Chairman Healey concurred that the 
document should be circulated to the full Board with a memo outlining 
some of the thoughts expressed today by the Executive Committee. 
Final action would be delayed until the March meeting. 

President Wood stated that the areas of conflict should be 
identified in the memo. Chairman Healey instructed Secretary 
McCartney to proceed with arrangements for meetings of the Study 
Group with individual members of the Board at an early date. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 

discussing merit increases to become effective in 
February 1973. 

It was later moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To come out of executive session for the purpose of 
discussing the remaining agenda items. 



4Q.mi/ 



Exec 
1-16-73 



Proposed 
Statement on 
Governance by 
Pan-University 
Study Group 
(DOC. T73-092, 
DOC. T73-098) 



Merit 
Increases 
FY 1973 



4038 

1-16-73 

Exec. Comm. 



Merit Increases 
FY 1973 



COMMITTEE 



Discussion of 

Merit Policy 

for Future 

Years 

(DOC. T73-099) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood invited reports on the general merit situation 
on the Amherst and Boston campuses. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, UM/ 
Amherst, stated that the merit policy guidelines had been well circu- 
lated on the campus. Awards are contemplated for 66% of those 
eligible or 49% of the total professional staff. Vice Chancellor 
Hamilton, on the same basis, reported that merit increments will be 
recommended for 80% of those eligible, which represents 58% of the 
total professional staff. Each explained the computations applied to 
spread the 4% of the 01 salaries available to cover merit increases, 
promotions, above-scale appointments, and special cases. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in 
view of the need to serve the many purposes for 
which the University's Merit Increase appropriation 
was intended, the President is authorized to 
implement a Merit Increase Pay Plan for profes- 
sional employees up to a maximum state-funded 
expenditure of $691,881, and is authorized to 
implement merit increases for professional 
employees paid from non-state funds at a compara- 
ble rate. In implementing this plan, the Presi- 
dent's authority is subject to appropriate Federal 
Wage Stabilization Guidelines. 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to 
be delegated to 
fessional posit 
salary rate or 
sently exists s 
implementation , 
merit increase 
the Chancellors 



the Board of Trustees that authority 
the President to classify those pro- 
ions for which a specific weekly 
a limited weekly salary range pre- 
olely as required to permit the 

effective February 4, 1973, of the 
recommendations of the President, 
and the Dean of the Medical School. 



Turning to the agenda item, Discussion of Merit Policy for 
Future Years (DOC. T73-099), Dr. Wood reported that the Amherst and 



Boston campuses were requested to submit policies to the Board for 
consideration. Although not ready for action at this meeting, the 
three models submitted by UM/Boston have been circulated to the Com- 
mittee along with a position statement from UM/ Amherst. Acting Chan- 
cellor Hamilton observed that the Boston plans share common traits: 
set aside money for promotions and adjustments and grant service- 
related increments as well as purely merit increases. Models #1 and 
#3 have received considerable campus support. Model #1 places limits 
on both service-related increments and the true merit awards with no 
difference from the present method of payment. Model #3 sets similar 
limits, but pays the latter award in the form of a bonus which does 
not increase the annual salary rate; hence, does not enter into 
salary figures for budget computations or across-the-board increases. 



r 



[ 



E 



COMMITTEE 



'™ 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Replying to Trustee Troy, Professor Lyons affirmed that 
acknowledgment of meritorious service does not necessarily guarantee 
a recommendation for tenure: merit recognizes outstanding service 
over the past year; tenure recognizes extraordinary performance over 
several years with strong potential for the future. 

Professor Burke said that a plan similar to the Boston 
Model #3 is being finalized by the Tenure and Grievance Committee 
of the Faculty Senate, UM/ Amherst; Dr. Gluckstern noted parallel 
action by the Deans' Council. 

President Wood discussed the Proposed Personnel Policy for 
Professional Nonacademic Staff (DOC. T73-090) . He reviewed the 
lengthy period of consideration, beginning with the Conlon Report, 
given to various aspects of the proposal on all three campuses as 
well as in the President's Office and the President's Council. The 
plan provides for employment security, a classification system, and 
professional improvement for the University's professional nonacademic 
staff, now numbering 527 persons all under a program of fixed-term, 
renewable contracts. Certain areas of the leave provisions and the 
classification system are still under discussion and revision. Mr. 
Kaplan described the proposal as being much different from the 
Conlon Report. He referred the Committee to the background documents 
provided containing analytical material. He stated that a main 
feature of the plan is its flexibility. Other institutions handle 
these matters by granting tenure, by providing open-ended contracts, 
through collective bargaining, or by conferring civil service status 
Assurance was given that the staff involved support the proposed 
policy. 

Trustee Pumphret pointed out that the preparation of job 
descriptions by a "supervisor" was too general an assignment of 
responsibility. He asked for a more .specific definition of who is 
the actual "supervisor" in the various categories of nonacademic 
professional employment. 

The Committee agreed that President Wood should review the 
proposed policy in line with today's discussion and present it at 
the January meeting of the Board. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:55 p.m. 



4039 

Exec. Comm. 
1-16-73 

Discussion of 

Merit Policy 

for Future 

Years 

(DOC. T73-099) 



Proposed 

Personnel 

Policy for 

Professional 

Nonacademic 

Staff 

(DOC. T73-090) 




Secretary, 




Cartney 

oard of Trust! 



4040 



COMMITTEE 



Daily Interest 
Account - 
Operating Fund 
Worcester County 
National Bank 
(DOC. T73-094) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

January 22, 1973; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office 
One Washington Mall, Boston, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret, President 
Wood; Trustees Crowley, Knowles , Ladd; Assistant Secretary 
Rawn, Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Treasure!' 
Johnson, Budget Officer Gartenberg 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc . : Messrs. Wood and Ladd 

Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. 

Vice President Phillips requested that consideration of the 
first item on the agenda, Guidelines for the Investment of the Endow- 
nent Funds (DOC. T73-093), be delayed until the end of the meeting. 



Turning to the next item, Daily Interest Account - Operation 



Fund, Worcester County National Bank , (DOC. T73-094) , the Treasurer 



reported that the University has been exploring additional ways to 
naximize the interest earned on the surplus trust fund cash in the 
Operating Fund. A year and a half ago, an automated cash disburse- 
nent system for trust funds paid through the Worcester County Nationa 
Bank was established. As a result, the amount of cash available for 
investment has been maximized by a tight daily cash control system. 
However, there remains the problem of losing time in switching funds 
aetween banks. The Treasurer is proposing to establish a new daily 
interest account paying 4%% compounded daily in the First National 
Bank of Amherst (which has merged with the Worcester County National 
Bank as part of the Worcester Bancorp, Inc.). He also stated that tho 
University would continue to use the daily interest account at the 
First National Bank of Boston, but the volume of activity there would 
oe reduced . The Treasurer said that no vote of the committee was 
aecessary but that he had wanted the Trustees to be aware of this 
improvement in cash handling. 

The Treasurer, in response to a question from Trustee Ladd, 
explained that the interest is put into a special trust fund clearing 
account (with the exception of some special accounts like R.S.O.). 
Chairman Pumphret commended the Treasurer for his management of the 
University money. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

With regard to New Endowment Funds (DOC. T73-095) , Treasureh: 
Johnson reported that the proposed Ralph E. Stratton Scholarship Fund 
was not ready for acceptance yet. There is a question about broad- 
ening the range of candidates for, at the present time, the scholar- 
ship would be given to high school students from Jaffrey, New Hamp- 
shire. There was a general consensus among the Committee that this 
limitation would cause no problem. 

The other endowment fund, Max H. Rapoport Wrestling 
Scholarship Fund , was considered by the Committee. The Treasurer 
explained that he would incorporate this fund as a sub-fund under 
the Barber fund. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees the establish- 
ment of a Max H. Rapoport Wrestling Scholarship 
within the Barber Endowment Fund with the proceeds 
of the gift of the New England Amateur Wrestling 
Foundation of 84.969 shares of Massachusetts Investors 
Trust and $133.00 in cash with the income earned 
therefrom to be available for an award up to an amount 
annually of $100 to an undergraduate male student 
in good standing in the University who is participating 
in the wrestling program at the Amherst campus. 
Said recipient is to be selected by the campus Com- 
mittee on Scholarships and Financial Aid on recom- 
mendation of the Athletic Department. 

The Committee then turned to the next item on the agenda, 
UM/Amherst Proposed Vote-Rate Changes in the Parking Garage (DOC. 
T73-088) . Vice Chancellor Campion explained that it is hoped that 
the parking garage will be self-liquidating by June 30, 1974. Under 
the present rates , the Campus Center garage would continue to face 
major financial problems. 

General discussion followed. In response to an inquiry 
regarding long-term parking rates, the Vice Chancellor explained that 
they were not proposing any increase in these at the present time* 
He added that they may find it necessary to lower the prices in the 
future. Chairman Pumphret stated that he was in favor of the propose^ 
increase in the rates. Mr. Campion said that the opening of the 
Library would hopefully increase the use of the garage. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees to further 
recommend to the University of Massachusetts 
Building Authority the adoption of the following 
rates for the Campus Center Parking Garage (part 
of Project XI) to be made effective the first of 
February, 1973: 



4041 



Finance Comm. 
1-22-73 

New Endowment 

Funds 

(DOC. T73-095) 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Vote- 
Rate Changes in 
the Parking 
Garage 
(DOC. T73-088) 



4042 

Finance Comm. 
1-22-73 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Proposed Fine 
Arts Fee for 
Graduate 
Students 
(DOC. T73-087) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Present Rates 







(B 


of 


T 


Vote 12- 


-28- 


Hourly 










$ .15 




Max. - 


up to 


8 hours 






.75 




Max. - 


9-24 1 


-lours 






1.50 




Hotel 


Suests 


per night 






1.00 





Proposed Rates 



.20 
1.00 
2.00 
1.50 



The Committee next, considered the Proposed Fine Arts Fee 
for Graduate Students, UM/ Amherst (DOC. T73-087). Vice Chancellor 



UM/Worcester — 
Fund Transfer 
(DOC. T73-091) 



Campion explained to the Committee that this proposed fee of $3.00 
per semester was developed in the Graduate Student Senate, and 
approved by the Rents and Fees Committee of the Undergraduate Student 
Senate. It is the same fee paid by undergraduates. The Fine Arts 
Council has adopted a change in membership which will reflect the 
new fee by allowing graduate students more representation on the 
Council as well as reductions in ticket prices . 

With no further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees approval of 
the adoption of a $3.00 per semester Fine Arts Fee 
for all full-time graduate students. This fee will 
be equal to that currently being paid by all under- 
graduates to support the Fine Arts Council Program. 

Chancellor Bromery reported to the Committee that the 
estate of the late Frank L. Boyden has donated an electric golf cart 
to the Physical Education Department of the University of Massachu- 
setts Amherst campus. Chairman Pumphret explained that it would be 
necessary to investigate the question of liability and other legal 
aspects before the Committee could accept the gift. The Chancellor 
suggested that he withdraw the request pending further legal advice 
and then submit the item through proper channels. 

Chairman Pumphret introduced the next item on the agenda, 
Fund Transfer, UM/Worcester (DOC. T73-091) . He explained that both 



r 



accounts, 07 and 13, could be used for the purchase of supplies. 
Dean Soutter reported that on the basis of discussion with represen- 
tatives of the State Budget Office, it was decided that it was more 
appropriate to use the 07 account solely for purchase of medical 
supplies in the teaching hospital. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

following fund transfer for the Worcester campus 
be approved: 

From: 07 Medical Supplies $96,000 

TO: 13 Special Supplies $96,000 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice President Phillips informed the Committee that in the 
past month, the University has been invited to submit requests for 
the deficient budget. The combined total subsequently submitted by 
the University was $360,000; with $165,000 for the Boston campus (to 
cover early preparations for the opening of Columbia Point), $150,000 
for the Worcester campus (to cover the operating of the power plant, 
services and staff), and $45,000 for the Amherst campus (to cover the 
cost involved in the move to the new library) . These were included 
in the Governor's deficiency budget but there has been no action by 
the Legislature yet. 

The Vice President then distributed to the Committee a 
Report of Fund Transfers Approved under Delegation of Authority to 



the President (DOC. T73-107). He explained that under this delega- 



tion, certain transfers could be made without the vote of the Commit- 
tee as long as they were consistent with the operating budget. 

The final item on the agenda, Guidelines for the Investment 
of Endowment Funds (DOC. T73-093) was then considered. President Wooi 



4043 

Finance Comm. 
1-22-73 



commented that this represents an intergenerational and interinsti- 
tutional collaboration effort. He commended both Treasurer Johnson 
and Mr. Ed Voci, a summer student intern in the President's Office, 
for their work on this matter. Treasurer Johnson explained that the 
purpose of the proposed guidelines was to establish a socially respon 
sive posture for the University. He reported that practically every 
major university as well as many foundations are adopting similar 
guidelines. The University, according to the Treasurer, has main- 
tained a socially responsive investment posture over the past few 
years (e.g. his sale of tobacco stocks after the Surgeon General's 
report). He said that the University's Investment Counsel has sup- 
ported this posture. 

The Treasurer has conducted an extensive review and study 
of this subject and the proposed guidelines found on page 7 of DOC. 
T73-093 represent a compilation of points found in other major insti- 
tutional policies on this subject. The only major difference betweer 
this policy and those of other institutions such as Yale University, 
is that, in special situations, the Treasurer will recommend the sale 
of stock in any company found to be inconsistent with the guidelines. 
This would be done rather than attempting to persuade the management 
of the company to alter their position by voting proxies since the 
University's investment level in any given company is not significant 
The Treasurer emphasized that still the first principle will be 
investment for the purpose of maximizing economic return. 

Treasurer Johnson also pointed out that he was recommending 
that for the present time, the University not establish a special 
committee to investigate investments. Rather, it is proposed that tHe 
existing channels of governance on each campus be utilized with stu- 
dent and faculty committees reporting to the Chancellor on this subject, 



Report of Fund 
Transfers 
Approved Under 
Delegation of 
Authority to 
President 
(DOC. T73-107) 

Guidelines for 

the Investment 

of Endowment 

Funds 

(DOC. T73-093) 



: 



4044 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Funds 

(DOC. T73-093) 

COMMITTEE 



Finance Coram. 
1-22-73 

Guidelines for The Treasurer reported that the Investor Responsibility 
the Investment Research Center, Inc., has been established. Its members include 
of Endowment aost major universities and foundations. For a fee of $500 per year, 

the University will obtain the center's analytical reports on various 
I Investment questions likely to be raised in the university context. 

Che Finance Committee, however, will still make final decisions on all 

Investments. 

Mr. John Wood, from Standish, Ayer and Wood, Inc., added 
that Treasurer Johnson, Mr. Theodore Ladd, and he have been working 
together on this matter over the past six months. His firm finds the 
guidelines to be very constructive and consistent with trends in the 
Investment management field generally. 

Trustee Ladd inquired about the reasons for not establishing 
a university-wide committee. He also expressed concern that infor- 
nation on these matters should be widely known. The Treasurer 
explained the proposed campus review procedure would strengthen the 
present governance machinery on the campuses. President Wood also 
observed that this mechanism should be tried but it would not fore- 
close alternative arrangements in the future. 

Treasurer Johnson reported to the Committee a question raised 
jy Trustee Rowland by phone (as she was unable to attend the meeting) 
regarding the legal responsibility of the Trustees in terms of actually 
naximizing investments and not selling at a loss. He responded by 
reporting that the Attorney General several years ago had given the 
opinion that the responsibility of investment by the Trustees was thai: 
of the "prudent man". The Finance Committee's powers to make the 
final decision in these matters fits into this standard. 

Chairman Pumphret observed that these guidelines were reason- 
able and that he supported the adoption of them by the Committee. He 
also stated that he felt it was important for the Committee to be abld 
to move quickly on these matters. He feels that any interested 
group have access to investment information, and be able to express 
their views on investment matters. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees the adoption 
of the Proposed Guidelines for the Investment of 
the Endowment Fund as set forth below: 



r 



The principal criterion for the selection or 
retention of portfolio securities should be that 
of maximum economic return within the context of 
a prudent but flexible investment policy that 
maintains a reasonable balance between the income, 
growth and security of the fund. 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

2. The University will seek to invest in corporations 
that have a responsible posture in matters relat- 
ing to (1) the protection of the environment, (2) 
public health, (3) consumer protection, (4) equal 
employment opportunities, and (5) compliance with 
national and international law. 

3. The University will endeavor to take informed and 
ethical positions whenever it exercises its 
voting rights as a stockholder and may communicate 
directly with management when there is evidence 
that the corporation is not acting responsibly 
in the public interest. 

4. When there is evidence that a corporation in which 
the University owns stock is persistently engaging 
in activities that are grossly contrary to these 
guidelines, the Treasurer, after consultation with 
investment counsel, will recommend the sale of 
that stock. 

5. In all cases, the Trustees of the University 
acting in accordance with its Bylaws through its 
Finance Committee shall make the final decision 
on all investments. 

6. In the event there are individuals or groups 
within the University communities that wish to 
express an opinion or to present factual infor- 
mation pertaining to securities held by the 
University, they may do so through the appropriate 
Chancellor or Dean of the Medical School to the 
President who may present them to the Finance 
Committee of the Trustees. 

For Trustee informational purposes only, President Wood 
asked Acting Chancellor Hamilton to report to the Committee about 
some of the construction and financial changes underway at Columbia 
Point. The Acting Chancellor said that the latest legislative over- 
sight committee has been investigating the Bureau of Building Con- 
struction (BBC) practices in general, and in particular, its 
relationship with M.B.M. (the project managers at Columbia Point). 
He said he is not aware of all the concerns, but that they are focus- 
ing on the methane gas-issue once again. Dr. Hamilton has reviewed 
the University's past relationship with both the BBC and M.B.M. and 
found that both have been on the highest level. He also said that 
whenever the University felt that either BBC or M.B.M. was not doing 
the job, the University notified them in writing. 

The Acting Chancellor also reported to the Committee that 
he had employed an M.B.M. person (during a leave of absence from 
M.B.M.) to consult with the campus on interior design and equipment. 



4045 



Finance Comm. 
1-22-73 



Guidelines for 

the Investment 

of Endowment 

Funds 

(DOC. T73-093) 



4046 

Finance Comm. 
1-22-73 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

rhis is a very common practice to assist in the ordering, delivery 
and installation of interior equipment, and it resulted in a large 
cost savings. 

Dr. Hamilton also informally reported to the Committee 
that the Justin Gray Housing Study has been released. The Acting 
Chancellor has arranged for a review process on the campus beginning 
on February 6. Campus recommendations will be forwarded to the Chan- 
cellor. He said that there are no easy answers to the issues raised 
regarding housing, transportation, and admissions, but that the cam- 
pus recognized problems existed and the campus intended to be as 
responsive as possible. 

The President reported that in light of the Justin Gray 
Sousing Study and the preliminary report of the Ad Hoc Committee on 
Building 080/2, as well as discussions held by the Trustees at the 
October retreat, he made last week's public announcement of the 
general plans for the University for the next five years. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 



r 




j. 

Secretary 



r 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 

January 24, 1973; 12:00 p.m.; Office of the President, One Washington 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood; 
Trustees Boyden, Kelly, Lambson, Shaler; Mr. Apostola for 
Trustee Ladd; Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Assistant 
Secretary Rawn, Ms. Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, Dr. Shapiro; 
Prof. Burke, rep. Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Associate Provost 
Babcock; Prof. Lyons, rep. faculty 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter, Dr. Tipper 

College of Public and Community Service, UM/Boston : 

Dean Strange, Messrs. Cagle, Chapman, Foster; Ms. Mahoney 



The meeting was convened by Chairman Troy at 12:20 p.m. 

President Wood commented briefly on recent developments in 
the area of education in the Commonwealth about which he will continu 
to keep the Trustees, the Chancellors, and the Dean up to date and 
informed. He reported a strong indication that the FY 1974 budget 
cuts have been partially restored, in part through the efforts of 
the campuses before Secretary Cronin and the firm stand taken last 
August by the Trustees. The 15:1 ratio can be maintained next year 
together with the basic principles of the budget request. However, 
the Trustees should be aware that the next innovation may be a bud- 
get by automatic programming or formula. 

Regarding the proposed reorganization presented by Secre- 
tary Cronin, the President has recently received a 60-page repor-t 
which will be distributed to the Trustees and the campuses for study. 
Dr. Wood touched on the overall administrative and appointive pro- 
visions of the proposal. He stated that he will be meeting with 
deans and department heads of all three campuses early in February 
for a thorough evaluation and discussion of the Reorganization pro- 
posal. 

Dean Soutter, UM/Worcester , requested approval for Use of 
the Title of Associate at the Medical School (DOC. T73-064) . This 
provides for appointments without faculty rank in the area between 
Instructor and Assistant Professor and is usually given to voluntary 
faculty. 



404? 



Mall 



President's 
i Comments 



UM/Worcester — 
Use of Title 
of Associate 
(DOC. T73-064) 



4048 

1-24-73 

F & EP Coram. 

UM/Wor ces ter — 
Use of Title 
of Associate 
(DOC. T73-064) 

COMMITTEE 

UM/Worcester — 
Appointment of 
Courtesy Staff 



UM/Worcester — 
Salary Range for 
Faculty Chairmen: 
Radiology, 
Anesthesiology, 
and Pathology 
(DOC. T73-104) 



UM/Worcester — 
Creation of a 
Department of 
Genetics 
(DOC. T73-105) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the titles of Associate and Clinical 
Associate for use by the Medical School, UM/ 
Worcester. 

Regarding the Appointment of Courtesy Staff at the Medical 
School, UM/Worcester, Dr. Soutter stated that renewal forms for about 
150 voluntary faculty are prepared each year. It is anticipated that 
this number will reach a total of three to four hundred. It was 
later determined that appointments without compensation can be made 
for periods of more than a year or for an indefinite period under 
existing procedures. 

Turning to the Discussion of the Salary Range for Faculty 
Chairmen: Radiology, Anesthesiology, and Pathology, UM/Worcester 
(DOC. T73-104), Dean Soutter quoted total salary figures of $60,000- 
$65,000 and above for qualified candidates. This includes the salary 
from a hospital, patient and/or other related fees, and remuneration 
for teaching. Until the Teaching Hospital requires full-time staff- 
ing, . the Medical School reimburses affiliated hospitals for about 
one-quarter of the maximum earnings, now restricted to $40,000 for 
faculty chairmen. Dr. Soutter requested an exception in the subject 
positions to permit payment of $65,000, of which the state's share 
will be below the maximum set for department heads. The Committee 
will be informed of appointments to these posts. 

Trustee Shaler, while concurring with the differential in 
salaries for the Medical School, expressed concern about the 
restrictions placed on outside earnings for faculty on the other two 
campuses. He requested that this policy be studied. 



After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



and 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve $65,000 as the combined maximum earnings 
(hospital, patient and/or other related fees, and 
teaching) for faculty chairmen in the Departments 
of Radiology, Anesthesiology, and Pathology at 
the Medical School, UM/Worcester. 

Dr. Tipper, Chairman of Microbiology, UM/Worcester, pro- 
posed the Creation of a Department of Genetics (DOC. T73-105) at the 
Medical School. Although some aspects are touched upon in other 
courses, there has been no responsible attempt to insure that stu- 
dents receive complete and thorough instruction in genetics. The 
need for specialized study in this area is being recognized by other 
medical schools as well. Of major importance are diagnosis, an 
understanding of the statistical possibilities of transference of 
genetic traits, and the treatment of genetic diseases; i It is -not 
intended to request additional faculty positions, funds, or space; 
these will be apportioned from those available in current and future 
appropriations to the Medical School. 



[ 



I 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Replying to Trustee Kelly, Dr. Tipper said that he felt 
arrangements could be made for UM/Boston pre-med students to audit 
Lectures. Vice President Edelman inquired about the (department) 
status of genetics at other institutions in the area. Dr. Tipper 
responded that the situation varies among institutions. He urged 
creation of an autonomous department with its own faculty rather than 
providing instruction through an agreement with another school. Dr. 
Soutter agreed and said that the faculty at the Medical School concurs 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the creation of a Department of Genetics 
at the Medical School, UM/Worcester. 



Dean 
for Dr. John B 
T73-103). Dr. 
Worcester, has 
earnings in ex 
School) . This 
services of ou 
and research. 



Soutter then requested approval of a Tenure Appointment 



Herrmann at the Medical School, UM/Worcester (DOC. 
Herrmann, Head Surgeon at the City Hospital of 
agreed to establish an Educational Fund with certain 

cess of $45,000 ($11,250 will be paid by the Medical 
method is used by other medical schools to secure the 

tstanding doctors who wish to devote time to teaching 



President Wood commented that the approval of this part-timp 
appointment with tenure should not imply overall endorsement of the 
practice nor should the Medical School be expected to pattern itself 
after procedures established at other schools. Each proposal will be 
considered on its own merits as they relate to the highest possible 
standards for the School. Also, Trustee Troy added, the policies of 
the Medical School cannot be used as models and practices for the 
rest of the University. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the appointment of Dr. John B. Herrmann, 
part-time with tenure, in the Department of 
Surgery at the Medical School, UM/Worcester, 
effective September 1, 1972. 

Continuing with the agenda, the Committee considered the 
Master Memorandum of Understanding with the National Park Service , 



UM/ Amherst (DOC. T73-101). Dr. Shapiro, Acting Head, Biology, UM/ 



Amherst, explained that this would not be binding on either party 
but would indicate an interest and provide a basis for discussions. 
Eventually, a contract would have to be effected if the proposal is 
determined to be feasible. Prof. Paul Godfrey, a former Park Service 
employee now at UM/ Amherst, together with several graduate students, 
has been engaged in research financed by the Service. The present 
proposal relates to ecological research centers at national sea- 
shores, one being located on Cape Cod, and would involve disciplines 



4049 



F & EP Comm. 
1-24-73 

UM/Wor ces ter — 
Creation of a 
Department of 
Genetics 
(DOC. T73-105) 



UM/Wor ces ter — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ment , Dr . John 
Herrmann 
(DOC. T73-103) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Master Memoran- 
dum of Under- 
standing 
(DOC. T73-101) 



4050 

F & EP Comm. 
1-24-73 

UM/Amhefst — 
Master Memoran- 
dum of Under- 
standing 

COMMITTEE 

(DOC. T73-101) 



UM/ Bos ton — 

College of 

Public and 

Community 

Service 

(DOC. T73-102) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

other than Biology. The memorandum specifies that any employees of 
the National Park Service assigned to do research at the Amherst 
campus will be expected to assume some teaching responsibility. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer of the 
University, to enter into a Master Memorandum of 
Understanding between the University of Massa- 
chusetts/Amherst and the National Park Service of 
the U.S. Department of the Interior. 

Chairman Troy reviewed the events culminating in the College 
of Public and Community Service . He introduced Dean Strange for con- 
sideration of his preliminary report on planning (DOC. T73-102). Dr. 
Strange introduced Ms. Eileen Mahoney, member, Planning Staff; Badi 
G. Foster, faculty member; Herrick Chapman, Assistant Dean; and 
Reginald Cagle, student member, Planning Staff. He expressed appreci- 
ation to all who had assisted with the six-month planning report and 
the attached review of the first three months of operation. 



The curriculum was developed to reflect both liberal arts 
courses and community-service-oriented courses in the form of six 
units: (I) Essential Skills, (II) Interpersonal and Organizational 
Skills, (III) Interpretative Skills, (IV) Professional Skills, (V) 
Independent Interest, and (VI) Problem-solving Skills. These are 
elaborated upon in the document and were reviewed in detail by Dean 
Strange for the Committee. A certificate (rather than a credit) 
system will be used whereby students will demonstrate accomplishment 
in each unit. No minimum, definite time limit has been set for 
satisfactory completion of each unit; however, a decision on ability 
to continue would probably be made after a second unsuccessful 
semester. 



Trustee Boyden requested information on the certif icate.-syapem 
and whether it terminated in a degree. Dean Strange replied that the 
students must be certified in all six units, which will represent 
about 12 certificates (of unequal value) , signifying a demonstrated 
capability to perform certain tasks; also, a demonstrated ability to 
transmit certain learned skills. Various methods of testing these 
accomplishments will probably be used; i.e., oral and written exami- 
nation, observation, demonstration, etc. The Dean explained that, in 
this type of performance-based curriculum, it is very important to 
assess progress at regular intervals to determine whether or not the 
student is acquiring the specific skills. 

Turning to the course work, Dr. Strange explained that this 
is one of the ways by which students will have an opportunity to 
acquire the skills. Some courses will be divided into segments or 
levels which will permit a student already partially skilled to 
start at a more advanced point. Others will be given in intense thre|a 
day sessions spaced several weeks apart. Recognition is given to the 
fact that many students must continue to hold outside jobs while 
attending college. Also, much responsibility will rest with the 



r 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

advisers who will be key persons in coordinating the needs and sched- 
ules of the students. Job opportunities will continually be assessed 
and considered when structuring the curriculum to encourage learning 
from actual experience. Dean Strange stated that the units are not 
necessarily sequential; however, the Essential Skills curriculum will 
be basic preparation for the entire college experience. 

Associate Provost Babcock noted that the certificate system 
had been considered for Colleges I and II earlier on, and that simila:: 
questions to those mentioned by Dean Strange had been raised. There 
are no good models in the nation for this, Dr. Strange said. Both th£ 
students and the faculty will learn from actually dealing with situ- 
ations that arise. 

Responding to Trustee Boyden, Dean Strange said that many 
applications have been received from older people with some or no 
previous college experience. Preference will probably be given to 
them, especially this first year, since they traditionally have highe:: 
motivation, more experience and ability, and are better adjusted to 
cope with the anticipated ambiguities in the curriculum. Prof. Lyons 
commented that this type of student body brings special problems whiclji 
can place enormous pressure on the administration. Dr. Strange 
emphasized that the teacher-faculty member-counsellor role will be of 
prime importance until experiences with the curriculum build a"source 
of information" base. 

Continuing his discussion of the units, Dean Strange men- 
tioned the continually changing job opportunities for B. A. graduates 
The College will be constantly alert to the employment situation and 
will maintain a curriculum which provides its students with the 
necessary skills and knowledge. Answering Trustee Shaler, Dr. Strang^ 
said that courses at other institutions will be used when available; 
this is being investigated with some area community colleges. Trustee 
Shaler also questioned whether the uniqueness of the College would 
attract more nonarea students than Colleges I and II. Dr. Strange 
agreed that this is possible. 

Replying to Trustee Boyden, Dean Strange differentiated 
between an "internship" and the proposed "field work learning 
experience" in that the latter is a learning experience in a nonclass-- 
room situation rather than the application of knowledge already 
acquired. It is not necessarily tied to a particular time period. 

Chairman Troy questioned whether the operation of the College 
will be more expensive than Colleges I and II. Dean Strange agreed 
it would be for the first few years, but added that, at the end of 
four years, the budget should be comparable to any other undergraduate 
institution. This can be done by expanding the faculty through pro- 
fessional sources on a part-time or consultant basis; by operating 
on a year-round calendar permitting maximum use of facilities and per 
sonnel; also, by granting certificates for previously acquired skills 
Financial aid is being sought from a number of foundations and state 
and federal agencies. Some of these have already expressed interest 
in the educational concept being developed at the College. President 



4051 



F & EP Comm. 
1-24-73 

UM/Boston — 

College of Public 

and Community 

Service 

(DOC. T73-102) 



405'; 



> 



F & EP Comm. 
1-24-73 

UM/Boston — 

College of Public 

and Community 

Service 

(DOC. T73-102) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Jood commented that, while overoptimism must be guarded, there is 
cpefinitely potential for outside financial assistance. Trustee Lamb- 
on later expressed optimism regarding federal grants. 

Replying to Trustee Kelly, Dean Strange said that the 
College will operate from the UM/Boston downtown campus if Columbia 
Point is not completed by fall, 1973. Concerning President Wood's 
Inquiry about the computer sciences , he said that facilities are 
planned to develop a program in the area of computer technology. 

Dr. Strange clarified for Trustee Troy that a basic under- 
Lying intention of the College is to relate the academic world to the 
"real" world. Mr. Foster emphasized that the college is an educational 
Institution — not a business or welfare organization — and the students 
ire there as students, not participants. 

Dean Strange concluded that the faculty and planning staff 
realize they have proposed a very ambitious program with high stan- 
lards. At the same time, they are aware of the many unknown factors 
diich must be learned only through experience. 

The next report will be brought to the Committee in March, 
hairman Troy thanked the Dean and his staff for their well-documentec 
>resentation. 

President Wood noted the many problems which beset the plan- 
ling of such a college which is not based on the liberal arts or 
sstablished as a traditional state college. He stated his general 
satisfaction with the report. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:45 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
January 31, 1973; 11:30 aim.; Parlor B, Statler Hilton Hotel, Bostfru 

RESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Acting Chairman Troy, President 
Wood; Trustees Gordon, Pumphret; Treasurer Johnson, Secre- 
tary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Boyden, Chandler, Croce, Crowley, Green 
blatt, Kelly, Knowles, Ladd, Shaler, Weldon; Ms. Hardy for 
Gov. Sargent, Mr. Callahan for Comm. of Education 

Administration, Faculty, '.-Staff , and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Lashman and 
Phillips, Ms. Robinson, Fr. Walsh, Mr. Cass, Assistant 
Secretary Rawn, Ms. Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery; Vice Chancellors Campion, 
Gage, Gluckstern; Budget Director Gulko; Dr. Shapiro rep. 
Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Assoc. Provost 
Babcock; Prof. Lyons, rep. faculty 

UM/Worcester: Dean Soutter 



The meeting was convened by Acting Chairman Troy at 11:30 



a.m. 



It was immediately moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
considering certain proposed merit increases. 

It was later moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session to consider the 
remaining item on the agenda. 

President Wood commented on Commissioner Greenblatt's 
return from an extended medical absence and the attendance of Under- 
secretary of Educational Affairs Gladys Hardy, representing Governor 
Sargent at Secretary Cronin's request. 

Turning to the Personnel Policy for Professional Nonacademi 
Staff (DOC. T73-090) , Vice President Phillips noted that persons have 



made contributions to the document from all campuses and the Presi- 
dent's Office. The aim is to provide elements of job security not 
previously held by this category of employees. The policy places sub 
stantial responsibility on the management structure of the University 
to recognize the professional nonacademic staff in an organized manned 
in the areas of job classification, evaluation and professional 
improvement. 



4053 



Personnel 
for Profes 
Nonacademi 
Staff 
(DOC. T73- 



090) 



4054 

Exec. Comm. 
1-31-73 

Personnel Policy 

for Professional 

Nonacademic 

Staff 

(DOC. T73-090) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chancellors and the Dean of the Medical School will alsc 
submit to the President recommendations for participation by nonacademd c 
professionals in campus governance and for implementation of the policy 
iocument on each campus taking into account the need to develop new 
grievance and appeal procedures. The President will coordinate the 
:ampus and University-wide recommendations and present consolidated 
recommendations to the Board at a later date. 

Mr. Phillips called attention to the fact that professional 
Improvement is provided for as a "matter of privilege rather than as 

right." Replying to questions about the minimum notice period 
required for resignations, he commented that the policy as stated in 
;he proposal has actually been followed, but on an "unwritten'! basis. 

Vice President Phillips confirmed for Trustee Gordon that it 
Is the privilege of the employee to request leave for professional 
Improvement and the University's privilege to grant or withhold it. 
rhis is in line with a Commonwealth administrative bulletin encourag- 
ing the use of leave for improvement purposes similar to the sabbatic4l 
Leaves granted to faculty members . 

President Wood endorsed the proposed policy as at least a 
beginning of recognition for a valuable segment of University employees 
■/ho are neither faculty nor classified. 

Various questions were raised on the application of merit 
Lncreases under the plan; also, regarding professional improvement 
policies. Mr. Phillips stated that specific job descriptions prepared 
jy supervisors and approved by the Personnel Office will be the basis 
for an annual evaluation and, where appropriate, a recommendation for 
a merit increase. Approval and recommendation of the employee's 
supervisor will also be required for professional leaves. The 
several campuses may employ slight variations in applying various com- 
ponents of the policy. Chancellor Bromery indicated that final 
approval at the Amherst campus will probably be at the Vice Chancelloi 
Level. 

Trustee Pumphret mentioned that, in the normal course of 
business, a specified salary rate would remain in effect for the life 
af a contract. When the contract is renewed, consideration would 
then be given for a salary (or merit) increase. Trustee Troy concurred. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve and adopt as the policy of the University 
of Massachusetts those provisions in the areas of 
employment security, classification system, annual 
evaluation procedures , and personnel policy and 
review contained in Document T73-090, said pro- 
visions to constitute a personnel policy for profes- 
sional nonacademic staff. The President of the 
University is requested to take appropriate steps 
to implement this at the University. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood recognized Commissioner Bicknell who was 
attending a Trustee meeting ro the first time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:45 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary 





:Cartney 

of Trustee 



405 



o 



Exec. Comm. 
1-31-73 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Motor Vehicle 
Regulations 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

January 31, 1973; 12:00 p.m.; Parlor B, Statler Hilton 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : President Wood; Trustees 
Crowley, Chandler, Howes, Knowles, Lambson, Pumphret, 
Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

UM/Amherst: Vice Chancellor Gage 



Acting Chairman Crowley convened the meeting at 12:10 p.m. 
Dr. Gage reported that the Department of Public Safety had recommendec 
a change in the Motor Vehicle Regulations for the Amherst campus to 
correct an oversight in the original document approved by the Board oi : 
Trustees on May 26, 1972. He said that this addition would bring 
regulations into conformity with the parking tickets now in use. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the following 
change in the Motor Vehicle Regulations for the 
Amherst campus : 

(1) In Article VIII Penalties 

(a) To change Section 2 by adding under Group A 
Fine - $10.00 each 

"07 - Parking within a posted tow-zone" 

(b) To advance each citation under Group B and 
Group C by one digit, so that they will be 
designated 08 - 026 respectively. 



The Vice Chancellor also informed the Committee that the 
Hampshire County District Court had requested clarification of the 
time when Motor Vehicle Regulations are enforced. In order to resolve 
this problem of time lag, the following motion was moved, seconded, aijid 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the following 
change in the Motor Vehicle Regulations for the 
Amherst campus : 

(2) In Article VI Operation of Vehicles 

To add 

"Section 5 Posting of Traffic Signs 

All additions , deletions , or other changes in 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Motor Vehicle Regulations, authorized by the 
Board of Trustees and involving signs controlling 
the operation and/or parking of motor vehicles, 
shall become effective at the time the appro- 
priate sign is posted or removed." 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:20 p.m. 



405? 



B & G Coram. 
1-31-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Motor Vehicle 
Regulations 



1 




Secretary, 



1 



4058 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
February 15, 1973; 11:00 a.m.; Office of the President, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President Wooi; 
Trustees Gordon, Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Secretary McCartney, 
Treasurer Johnson 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President: Messrs. Searson and Yarmolinsky 



11:05 a.m. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 

discussing certain personnel and financial matters 
related to UM/Boston and the President's Office. 

After appropriate discussion and exchange of views, it was 
moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of taking a vote. 

It was then moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in the 
event that the Justices of the Supreme Judicial 
Court are of the opinion that the rental for the 
premises at One Washington Mall, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, occupied by the Office of the President, 
cannot be paid from State appropriations, then, 
without prejudice, said rental, which is owed for 
the months of October, 1972 through January, 1973, 
be paid from discretionary funds of the University. 



f 



The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 



t. 



Robert J. McCartney 
Secretary, Board of Trustees 



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COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

February 28, 1973; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office, One Washington Mai}, 

Boston, Mass. 

'RESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Acting Chairman Crowley, 

President Wood; Trustees Chandler, Knowles, Pumphret, Kelly 
Sullivan; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Ms. Pugh, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg, Assistant Secretary Rawn, Mrs. Robinson j 
Assistant to the President 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Planning Officer Littlefie^d 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Prof. Lyons, Planning 
Officer Prince, Dean Strange (CPCS) ; Mr. Freeland, Director 
of Educational Planning; Ms. Joan Tonn, Dr. Hogarty (CPCS), 
Dr. Bennett (CPCS) 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter, Associate Dean Stockwell; 
Mr. Reno, Director of Planning; Mr. Cathey, Controller; 



Mr. 



Greig, Director of Physical Plant 



Architects : Messrs. 
Bros. Architects; Mr, 



Vaisey, Haight, and Coletti, of Coletti 
Gary of Moriece & Gary Land Consultants: 



4059 



Mr. Roth, architectural consultant 

Bureau of Building Construction (BBC) : Mr. Cusack 

Acting Chairman Crowley convened the meeting at 10:15 a.m., 
md called on Acting Chancellor Hamilton to present the first item on 
he agenda, UM/Boston Preliminary Drawings for Building 030 . Dr. 
Hamilton explained to the Committee that these preliminary drawings 
:iad been reviewed by appropriate officers and persons on the Boston 
campus and by members of the President's staff. The Committee is 
>eing asked to approve them so that the architects may proceed with 
:he working drawings. He called on Dean Strange to make the presen- 
tation. 



Dean Strange termed the 030 preliminary drawings "exciting 1 
lie commended all those who had helped in the effort to plan the build- 
ing which contains a number of unique facilities: a conference center, 
i;ood division and variety of dining space, location directly on the 
street, a large library subdivided into quiet, separate study areas; 
also, combined teaching and office space, and very attractive exterior 
design. 

Mr. Barry Coletti of Coletti Brothers Architects then gave a 
detailed report on the drawings for Building 030 using diagrams show- 
ing the floor plans. He further explained the unique features men- 
tioned earlier by Dean Strange, pointing out that the street varies 



UM/Boston — 
Preliminary 
Drawings , 
Building 030 



4060 

B & G COMM. 
2-28-73 

UM/Boston — 
Preliminary 
Drawings , 
Building 030 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

from level to level. He then called on Mr. Gary who did the land- 
scaping for the building. 

Mr. Gary, using slides, showed the Committee the various 
Levels of terraces involved in the design. These will be utilized 
Eor recreation, study, and social activities. 

General discussion followed. 

In response to a question from Trustee Knowles, Mr. Gary 
Explained that the prevailing winds come from the southwest. This 
area of Building 030 would be sheltered by the science building as 
tfell as the trees. Three to four feet of soil and loam will be pro- 
vided for the plantings. 

Trustee Chandler inquired whether Mr. Gary had been in 
touch with the Waltham Field Station personnel in regard to the plant 
ing of trees and shrubs in an urban area. The Waltham Field Station 
is working on plant growth under various air-pollution conditions . 
tfr. Gary responded affirmatively, adding that the Field Station had 
been of great help in the development of this design. 

In response to a question from Acting Chancellor Hamilton, 
Mr. Cusack of the BBC reported that the building estimates were well 
within the budget at the present time (approximately $22,800,000). 
He stated that there would be a savings of almost one-half million 
dollars by using reinforced concrete rather than steel for the first 
two levels. 

President Wood asked Mr. Harold Roth, consulting architect, 
for comment. Mr. Roth reminded the Committee that when schematic 
drawings for Building 030 were presented, it was decided to slow down 
and provide more time for development of the preliminary drawings. 
The arrival of Dean Strange has also permitted additional input in 
development of the plans. Mr. Roth commended the architects. He 
stressed that they had responded to the University's academic needs 
in an outstanding way. He recommended that the Committee accept the 
preliminary drawings of Building 030. 

In response to Trustee Pumphret's inquiry about how many 
persons the dining area could accommodate, Dean Strange said, 600. 
Mr. Pumphret then questioned whether or not consideration had been 
given to the idea of one central area for preparation of food rather 
than separate facilities for College I, College II, and College III. 
Acting Chancellor Hamilton replied that a consultant, early on, had 
given this matter considerable study. Consideration had been given 
to designing one of the kitchens large enough to service both college 

In response to a question on the percentage of academic 
space provided, Mr. Coletti said approximately 50%. This did not 
include space created by innovative ideas of Dean Strange, such as 
using part of the dining areas as meet ing /seminar rooms during lunch 
time. Such areas, of course, are not considered offically designated 
academic space, but could be regarded as available academic space. 



\ 



I 



f 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to a question regarding the time-use of this 
juilding, Dean Strange said that he would report to the Faculty and 
Educational Policy Committee in March on the curriculum proposal. 
Ihat report will cover the use of the building. At this point, he 
expects approximately 50% more use than normal. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the preliminary drawings of Building 030, 
UM/Boston at Columbia Point, as submitted by 
Coletti Brothers, Architects. 

President Wood turned to the next item on the agenda, The 
Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on Building 080/2 (DOC. T73-114). 



4061 

B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 

UM/Boston — 
Preliminary 
Drawings , 
Building 030 



The President explained to the Committee that 14 months ago, because 
of changes in enrollment and academic programs , he recommended that 
the University take a new look at the physical plans for the campus, 
particularly the plans for Building 080/2. Last August, Acting Chan- 
cellor Hamilton and President Wood appointed an Ad Hoc Committee to 
undertake this study. At the Hyannis meeting in October, a preliminary 
report was presented to the Trustees. The Ad Hoc Committee, composed 
of members of the President's staff and members of the Boston campus, 
included Richard Freeland, Director of Educational Planning; Nan 
Robinson, Assistant to the President; William Rawn, Assistant Secre- 
tary; Harold Roth, Planning Consultant; Willard Prince, Director of 
Planning and Development; Marvin Atonoff, Professor of Physics; and 
Harold Thurman, Professor of Art. The President commended the Task 
Force on the fine job done and asked Ms. Robinson and Mr. Freeland 
to make a joint presentation. 

Ms. Robinson stated that the Ad Hoc Committee had used two 
bases to assess the effect of alternative enrollment on Building 
080/2. The first was the distinction between college buildings and 
central facilities. Central facilities include the library, gym, 
administration and service building, and space for noncollege academi 
programs, particularly the physical sciences and fine arts. 



The second base was the formula used in the original 
planning for the campus of 200 gross square feet (GSF) per student. 
Using the formula, the Committee noted that, at an enrollment of 
10,000 students, no further construction of central facilities would 
be possible. This does not seem to the Committee a viable enrollment 
level for the campus from the point of view of physical planning. 
At an enrollment of 12,500 students, however, 149,000 GSF would be 
"available" for new central facilities, making possible only one 
central facility building, but not two. (The original Master Plan 
called for both a second science building and a fine arts building) . 
The Ad Hoc Committee, using an assumption of 12,500 students, then 
undertook to assess the space needed for all central activities not 
yet provided for at the campus, and to explore how these might be 
accommodated in a single building. 



UM/Boston — 
Report of the 
Ad Hoc 

Committee on 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. T73-114) 



4062 

B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 



UM/Boston — 
Report of the 
Ad Hoc 

Committee on 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. W3=HS5 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Pumphret stated his concern that the 080/2 report 
seemed to base enrollment on the need to build and fill buildings 
rather than on the availability of qualified students. President 
Wood responded that the Committee's work was paralleled by enrollment 
studies and projections that formed part of the arthmetic for the 
decision made at Hyannis to level off the Columbia Point enrollment 
at 12,500. Concurrently, it was necessary to look at the realities 
imposed by buildings already in place. It would have been unfortunat 
to make any enrollment decisions which would have left a half-finished 
campus which could not adequately serve students already there. 

Trustee Pumphret also questioned the applicability of a 
UM/ Amherst space needs formula to a commuter campus. In response, 
Treasurer Johnson explained that, when initial planning for Columbia 
Point began, the Master Planning firm felt that the 200 GSF per FTE 
student guideline was too conservative a standard because commuter 
students would use common spaces between classes more intensively 
than on a dormitory campus where students would return between 
classes to their respective residence and dining halls , both of which 
are not included in the state's 200 GSF/FTE guidelines. Ms. Robinson 
explained that, given the changes in the programs and enrollment, 
it was necessary for the Committee to review the way Building 080/2 
might fit into the campus at this mid-point in its development. 

Mr. Freeland pointed out that, when the Committee was given 
its charge, it was concerned primarily with studying physical planning 
problems for three different enrollment projections. While the study 
was being conducted, the Trustees adopted a 12,500 enrollment level. 
The report, therefore, does not address itself to the question of 
availability of students because the Committee's primary task was to 
study the physical planning needs in order to plan a viable campus for 
the target enrollment figure of 12,500. 

Mr. Freeland continued that, based on the figures mentioned 
earlier, only one additional central facility could be built at the 
campus at this time. The following needs, he said, are not being 
met at the present time: noncollege academic space needed for 
physical sciences and fine arts; noncollege space needed for some 
student services and activites, computer service space, and reception 
areas; noncollege institute space, and graduate administration space 
He reported that the Committee had to estimate the space requirements 
for these areas and the results are contained in the report. The 
Committee also found that, due to the reduction in enrollment pro- 
jection from 15,000 to 12,500, some of these needs could be met in 
the Phase I buildings. 

As a result of these findings, the Committee proposed a 
multipurpose facility for the science, fine arts, and student services 
and activities areas. Both the science department and the fine arts 
department feel that the space assigned to them in Building 080/2 is 
adequate. The Committee thinks that the building will contain an 
exciting mixture of uses in a highly important central location. 



1 



COMMITTEE 



i 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to a question on the amount of space allocated 
to health services at Columbia Point, Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
reported that this matter is under study at the present time. 

President Wood then requested Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
to explain to the Committee the capital outlay implications of the 
new enrollment target and the 080/2 report. Mr. Hamilton said that 
at 12,500 FTE, the campus would not need one of the college build- 
ings (060). In addition, a separate fine arts building as proposed 
in the Master Plan would not be necessary. The total cost for a 
completed campus at Columbia Point, using the proposed 080/2 build- 
ing, would be approximately $304 million as compared with the 
originally planned $361 million campus. Dr. Hamilton noted that this 
would be a savings of more than $50 million for a completed campus . 

Trustee Crowley turned to the next item on the agenda, 
Status of Power Plant - UM/Worcester . Dean Soutter called on Mr. 



Greig, Director of Physical Plant, who reported that the Power Plant 
was almost completed. There are two major problems: (1) it is 
impossible to operate the building until all safety requirements are 
met, especially catwalks to provide safe access to valves; (2) there 
is a general shortage of qualified engineers, and this further is 
aggravated by the unattractive Commonwealth salary levels for such 
positions, making it next to impossible to recruit engineers at the 
Medical School plant. The Department of Personnel, however, is con- 
sidering an upgrading of one grade for engineers at this time. 
Without an adequate staff of engineers, the Medical School will not 
be able to place its power plant in operation. Mr. Greig reported 
that a number of alternatives were being considered, but the best 
solution would be an up-grading of the classified position of 
engineers. 



4062A 

B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 

UM/Boston — 
Report of the 
Ad Hoc 
Committee on 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. T73-114) 



UM/Worcester — 
Status of 
Power Plant 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



BLANK PAGE 



Proposed Parking Garage at the Worcester campus. Chairman Crowley 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The next item on the agenda was an Initial Discussion of th 



explained that the Committee had not received the report and there- 
fore would delay the discussion of this topic until its next meeting. 

Chairman Crowley called on Dean Soutter to report on the 
Status of Acceptance of New Buildings . The Dean said that the main 



floor of the Science building would be ready for occupancy by early 
summer. However, before occupying the building, it is necessary to 
have the power plant in operation. Six weeks are needed to train the 
engineers. The Dean said also that partial occupancy of the hospital 
is scheduled for the spring of 1975, and full occupancy in the fall 
of that year. 

Dean Soutter and Trustee Chandler reported to the Committee 
on their attendance at a recent meeting held to discuss a bill pro- 
posed by Representative Conte to build a school of veterinary medicin^ 
at the site of the Grafton Mental Hospital which includes approximate 
1,000 acres of land. The school would then be turned over to the 
University of Massachusetts Medical School to serve as its School of 
Veterinary Medicine. 

Dean Soutter reported that an expert in the field of 
veterinary medicine had visited the Worcester campus and recommended 
that a veterinary hospital be built near a human hospital so that 
students can study in both areas. He recommended that the Grafton 
facility be used for animal experimentation. Associate Dean Stockwel . . 
feels that Grafton would serve well as an isolation area for animals 
having contagious diseases. It would cost approximately $40 million 
if the veterinary complex was built at the Grafton site as opposed 
to $15 million if located at UM/Worcester near the Medical School 
hospital. 

Trustee Chandler pointed out that, currently, there is no 
place in Massachusetts or New England for Massachusetts' students to 
go to study veterinary medicine. He stressed the importance of hav- 
ing a large animal hospital in the New England area. A hearing is 
scheduled for March 14 on this proposed bill. 

Chairman Crowley then turned to the Amherst campus items on 
the agenda, the first of which is Progress Report - Land for Fire 
Station Site and Sharing Cost of Fire Apparatus (DOC. T73-120). 



-y 



Planning Officer Littlefield, of UM/ Amherst, reported that, in 
June 1970, the transfer of land to the Town of Amherst for a fire 
station site was approved in concept by the Board of Trustees. This 
was subject to the location of the new DPW road in the vicinity of 
East Pleasant Street. Mr. Littlefield now urges approval in principl^ 
by the Committee for the actual transfer of an approximately 3.8-acre 
site on the northeasterly side of the intersection of East Pleasant 
Street and Tilson Farm Road, as described in the sketches he displayed 
After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 






B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 

UM/Wor ces ter — 
Proposed Parking 
Garage — 
Initial 
Discussion 
Postponed 

Status of 
Acceptance of 
New Buildings 



UM/ Amherst — 
Land for Fire 
Station Site — 
Sharing Cost of 
Fire Apparatus 
(DOC. T73-120) 



4064 

B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 



UM/ Amherst — 
Land for Fire 
Station Site 
Sharing Cost 
of Fire 

Appartli&MMITTEE 

(DOC. T73-120) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Temporary Trans- 
fer of Land to 
DPW for Con- 
struction of 
By-Pass 
(DOC. T73-120) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that Chancellor 
Bromery, UM/ Amherst, be authorized to notify the 
Town of Amherst Selectmen that a site consisting 
of approximately 3.8 acres on the northeasterly 
side of the intersection of East Pleasant Street 
and Tillson Farm Road, as detailed on sketches pre- 
sented by Planning Officer Littlefield, has been 
reviewed by the Trustees who support in principle 
its transfer to the Town of Amherst for the purpose 
of erecting a Fire Station, subject to final 
determination of the appropriate metes and bounds, 
and subject to final Trustee action at a future 
meeting. 

Mr. Littlefield pointed out that the University had parti- 
cipated previously in the acquisition of two pieces of fire apparatus 
for the Town of Amherst (in the mid 50' s and again in 1968). Propose^ 
sharing of the cost of equipment for the new fire station is a con- 
cept for which the Amherst campus is requesting Trustee support in 
principle, subject to the availability of state funds. Mr. Little- 
field explained that the need for this new fire station was pointed 
out to the University by the recent fire loss in Tobin Hall. It was 
then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize Chancellor Bromery, UM/Amherst, to 
notify the Town of Amherst Selectmen that the 
Trustees support in principle the concept of the 
University sharing on a 50/50 basis the cost of 
two new fire trucks; a 1,000 gallon pumping engine 
and a new elevating platform type fire truck, sub- 
ject to the availability of state funds amounting 
to $67,500 for this purpose. 

Mr. Littlefield presented the next item on the agenda, 
Temporary Transfer of Land to the DPW for Construction of a By-Pass 



(DOC. T73-120). Mr. Littlefield pointed out that the temporary tak- 
ing of University land in Amherst and Hadley is required by the DPW 
to enable them to construct the North Pleasant Street by-pass road. 
In turn, the construction of this road on University and other 
privately owned property to be taken by the DPW will enable the 
University to meet its commitments to the Town of Amherst for the 
closing of North Pleasant Street. The University land involved 
amounts to approximately 48 acres along the road corridor . With 
Trustee support, the Amherst campus would be able to work with the 
DPW to identify the metes and bounds along this 48-acre corridor. 
Formal Trustee action transferring the precise acreage would take 
place at a future meeting. Approximately seven acres of the above- 
mentioned land is involved in the Route 116 interchange with the 
North Pleasant Street By-pass road, and title to this land should 
remain with the DPW and the state highway system. Appropriate 
sections of this new road and land will be exchanged in the future 
with the Town of Amherst for title to a portion of North Pleasant 
Street. 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Littlef ield, in response to a question from Trustee 
Chandler, explained that it was necessary to change the title of the 
Land back,. to the University from the DPW in order for the University 
to change title with the Town of Amherst when North Pleasant Street 
Ls ready to be closed. 

It was moved, seconded and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize and support the administration of UM/ 
Amherst in working with the Department of Public 
Works, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, in deter- 
mining the appropriate metes and bounds of parcels 
of land totaling approximately 48 acres to be taken 
temporarily by DPW for the purpose of constructing 
the North Pleasant Street By-Pass Road, the title 
to approximately seven acres of said land to be 
retained by DPW for the Route 116 interchange; 
the title to approximately 41 acres to be returned 
to the University at a later date, so that said 
title to 41 acres may be transferred by future 
vote of the Trustees to the Town of Amherst in 
exchange for the title to the portion of North 
Pleasant Street bisecting the University campus 
which will then be closed off. 

Turning to the final item on the agenda, President Wood 
isked Vice President Phillips to present the Capital Outlay Budget 
Requests for FY 1973 and FY 1974 (DOC. T73-116) . Mr. Phillips 



reported that last fall the University submitted its Capital Outlay 
Request for Fiscal Year 1973 to the Governor via the Board of Higher 
Education. However, due to the fiscal crisis facing the Commonwealth, 
:io capital outlay appropriation request was submitted by the Executive 
department to the Legislature. The Vice President reminded the Com- 
mittee that, in November, after a preliminary discussion of capital 
mtlay requests, the Trustees voted that a thorough review be con- 
zinued of the University developments, requirements, and investments 
over the next five years. In January, Mr. Phillips reported that the 
Jniversity was invited to submit an Emergency Capital Outlay Budget 
Request for FY 1973. A detailed description of the request which 
:otaled $2,996,000 is outlined in DOC. T73-116. The Committee was 
isked to recommend endorsement of this action. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the submission of the following amounts 
for the Fiscal Year 1973 Emergency Capital Outlay 
Request: 



Amherst 

Boston 

Worcester 
TOTAL 



$1,100,000 

1,500,000 

396,000 
$2,996,000 



4065 



B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Temporary Trans- 
fer of Land to 
DPW for Con- 
struction of 
By-Pass 
(DOC. T73-120) 



President's 
Office- 
Report of Action 
on Emergency 
Capital Outlay 
Budget, FY 1973 
and Capital 
Outlay Budget, 
FY 1974 
(DOC. T7 3-116) 



4066 

B & G Comm. 
2-28-73 



Capital Outlay 
Budget Requests 
for FY 1974 
(DOC. T73-116) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Committee then discussed the Capital Outlay Budget 
Requests for FY 1974 (DOC. T73-116) . Chancellor Bromery pointed out 



hat it is critical for the Amherst campus that the first two items, 
Renovation and Remodeling of Existing Buildings and Campus Safety- 
campus Improvements, be considered equally important in terms of 
riorities. Vice President Phillips said that a special effort will 
>e made to emphasize this importance in presenting the budget requests 

Mr. Phillips explained that a description of the items 
requested from the campuses was outlined in DOC. T73-116 which was 
previously mailed to the Committee. 

General discussion followed. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the submission of the following amounts 
for the Fiscal Year 1974 University of Massa- 
chusetts Capital Outlay Request: 

Amherst $12,245,000 

Boston 89,500,000 

Worcester 9,406,950 

$111,151,950 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:40 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary, 



6^ 



artney /r" 
oard of Trustees^ 



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COMMITTEE 'RESENT : 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
March 1, 1973; 11:30 a.m.; Room 1009, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 



uission: 



Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood; 
Trustees Abrams, Ladd, Lambson, Shaler, Shearer; Dr. Wilfrec 
Bloomberg for Trustee Greenblatt; Secretary McCartney; 
Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Mss. 
Robinson and Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, 
Associate Provost Bischoff , Dean Edds ; Prof. Burke, rep. 
Faculty Senate; Messrs. Apostola and Kraus. For School of 
Education: Dean Allen, Assoc. Deans Gentry and Seidman 

UM/Boston : Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall; Prof. Lyons, 
rep. faculty 

UM/Worcester : Dr . Saunders 



The meeting was convened at 11:40 a.m. by Chairman Troy. 

President Wood noted the importance of this General Pis- 
Status and Review of Graduate Programs by the Trustees with 



406? 



Chancellor Bromery and Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, UM/Amherst; Acting 
Vice Chancellor Marshall, UM/Boston and Vice President Edelman, who 

ogether with Dean Appley have been appraising the University's 
programs as related to the interests of applicants and market demands. 
,le commented that this year's graduate applications had exceeded those 

for the undergraduate program. 

Dr. Bromery cautioned that long-range planning is involved 
with UM/Amherst, Boston, and Worcester working together as a multi- 
campus university. Elements to be considered are relationships with 
:he private higher education sector and the developing ethnic popula- 
tion of the Commonwealth. He stressed that there can be no firm plan, 
but rather periodic developmental reports. 

Dr. Gluckstern reported that Dean Appley has been reviewing 
:he overall graduate program with Department Heads and Deans and is 
now discussing which areas should be eliminated, phased down, or 
accelerated; however, reductions in the budget are unlikely. It is 
anticipated that admission quotas will reduce enrollment by about 
MOO next year. Tenured faculty affected by program changes will pro- 
>ably be reassigned to appropriate units within the University. 
Replying to Mr. Apostola, Dr. Gluckstern stated that admissions requirle 



General Dis- 
cussion: Status 
and Review of 
Graduate Programs 



F & EP Comm. 
3-1-73 

General Discus- 
sion: Status 
and Review of 
Graduate Programs 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Proposal for a 
Graduate Degree 
Program in Math 
(DOC. T73-117) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ments have not been specifically reviewed, but that consideration is 
not based on a single examination, equal backgrounds, etc. Specific 
attention is being given to teacher training related to instruction 
of graduate students in the art of learning. Vice President Edelman 
commented that the review to date contemplates more program mergers 
than eliminations , but that some individual programs which are 
neither merged nor eliminated may well be reduced in student size by 
as much as 50 percent over the next several years . 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern stated that specific efforts to 
attract teaching assistants from minority groups will be continued 
(provision of 50 percent of salary to department) to increase the 
number of qualified women and minority students. 

Chancellor Bromery will advise Trustee Ladd when a com- 
parative analysis of what the various schools are doing will be avail 
able. This will be a status report on present activities and future 
planning. President Wood said that a public presentation to the 
Trustees is expected soon. This will also be used for professional 
analysis. Further, this may introduce a notion of selectivity and 
strategic concern and clearly emphasize that no university is possibl 
without a graduate school. However, an honest internal evaluation 
must be made to achieve excellence in chosen areas as opposed to thos 
in which another institution might excel. Dr. Bromery noted that 
problem areas will be reviewed first with the assistance of a progres 
consultant. 

For UM/Boston, Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall predicted a 
full-fledged graduate program evolving from the modest number of 
degrees (four) now offered. She referred to the overwhelming tasks 
now being undertaken at the undergraduate level in addition to the 
move to Columbia Point as precluding any strong effort on a graduate 
program at the present time. The UM/Boston Graduate Council and the 
faculty as a whole agree that this is not the time to accelerate at 
the graduate level. Professor Lyons, UM/Boston, concurred. He 
added that it is evident that a graduate program is needed and 
should be projected into future planning to reassure the faculty. 
Dr. Marshall cited great interest in graduate teaching among the 
UM/Boston faculty. She expressed interest in the proposed inter- 
campus faculty exchanges proposed by Vice Chancellor Gluckstern. 

Vice President Edelman touched on the possibility of using 
graduate programs in private institutions through cooperative 
arrangements or by means of fellowships. He urged that UM/Boston 
students and alumni be informed of graduate studies available at 
UM/ Amherst. 

The Committee then turned to the Proposal for a Graduate 
Degree Program in Mathematics, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-117). Acting 
Vice Chancellor Marshall, referring to a memo to the Committee from 
Dr. Eisenberg, Acting Department Head, Mathematics and Statistics, 
UM/ Amherst, stated that the quality of the program will remain the 
same; the only change will be that UM/Boston will grant the degree 



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COMMITTEE 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

rather than UM/ Amherst. President Wood assured her that Vice Chan- 
cellor Gluckstern will discuss Dr. Eisenberg's objections to the pro- 
posal with him before the Board acts on March 7 . Chancellor Bromery 
commented that the broad issue behind this specific case is the poor 
communications between the two campuses. Dr. Marshall agreed that 
this is particularly true in the area of graduate studies. Dr. 
Bromery declared that every effort must be made to remedy this 
situation. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Graduate Program in Mathematics at 
UM/Boston as outlined in DOC. T73-117 as a degree 
program from that campus rather than UM/ Amherst. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern then introduced discussion on tht 
Progress Report of the Premedical Program for Minority and Disadvan- 



taged Students (DOC. T73-121). In response to an inquiry from 



Trustee Abrams, a committee chaired by Dr. William Darity, Head of 
the Department of Public Health, and President of CCEBS, was estab- 
lished to coordinate a program which hopefully would guarantee an 
increase in the number of minority and disadvantaged students being 
accepted at a medical school. Dean Edds of the Faculty of Natural 
Sciences and Mathematics, UM/ Amherst, a member of the committee, 
stressed the difficulty of actually guaranteeing admission to a 
medical school for UM/Amherst minority students, since very few are 
in related prerequisite programs. The basic effort needed at this 
time is to generate a greater interest in the sciences and to offer 
financial aid, counseling and advising, and other academic support 
components . 

Chancellor Bromery said that most of the minority students 
at UM/Amherst are not in the CCEBS Program; many of the present 
options are completely new concepts; minority students must have 
incentive to go into a specific area in the form of guaranteed 
alternatives. He offered to talk with the committee along these lines 

Dr. Edds noted problem areas in defining what "guaranteed 
acceptance" means. He reported a striking percentage of minority 
students in nonscience disciplines, adding that the areas of medical 
science and health training in general have not attracted a signif- 
icant number of such students at UM/Amherst. 

Trustee Abrams urged that the program be publicized . He 
mentioned that Hampshire College is identifying potential scholars 
in the fourth and fifth grades. A program at the Roxbury Medical- 
Technical Institute arranges exposure to medical areas for interested 
students through providing work opportunities with orderlies and 
doctors. Dr. Abrams stressed the special need for a Spanish-speaking 
doctor in the Holyoke area. He also mentioned that the Boston Univer- 
sity Medical School hosts high school students for one week to 
acquaint them with the program there. Chancellor Bromery said that 



F & EP Comm. 
3-1-73 

UM/Boston — 
Proposal for a 
Graduate Degree 
Program in Math 
(DOC. T73-117) 



UM/Amherst — 
Progress Report- 
Premedical 
Program for 
Minority and 
Disadvantaged 
Students 
(DOC. T73-121) 



4070 

F & EP Comm. 
3-1-73 



UM/Amherst — 
Progress Report 
Premedical Pro- 
gram for 
Minority and 

_ . , COMMITTEE 

Disadvantagea 
Students 
(DOC. T73-121) 



UM/Amherst — 
Report of 
School of i 
Education 
(DOC. T73-119) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

he recently visited the University of Michigan Medical School from 
hhich 37 black physicians will soon graduate. He has tried to interesl: 
several of them in the University's Health Services or in the Amherst 
community. Trustee Lambson suggested that opportunities in a variety 
of services and professions should be outlined to minority students 
rather than emphasizing only medicine. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern informed Trustee Abrams that, 
while no target date for the final report has been set, progress is 
already being made on the Amherst campus in this area as evidenced 
by gradually increasing interest by minority students in the sciences 
Chairman Troy requested that the Committee be kept informed of pro- 
gress. Dr. Edds proposed submission of a preliminary report by the 
end of the spring semester which will identify steps required before 
the program can start, including the need to improve the University's 
interface with the secondary schools. 

Dr. Saunders, UM/Worcester , reported that the Medical 
School has accepted a small number of minority students who later 
decided to attend a more prestigious school. He said that requiring 
applicants to be residents of the Commonwealth further reduces 
eligibility. Dean Soutter and his faculty, while recognizing the 
efforts of Dr. Darity's committee, are attempting to implement the 
Affirmative Action Program and are willing to admit minority appli- 
cants who do not meet the usual requirements for entrance provided it 
is understood by the Trustees and the Legislature that such admission!: 
are to a special program. The Medical School administration has been 
in contact with Freedom House, Inc., in Roxbury and is waiting for 
a response from Mrs. Snowden. 

Chairman Troy queried how important the problem of financial 
aid might be. Dr. Saunders mentioned a meeting in June 1972 with 
Dr. Roberta Franklin at the Campus Center, UM/Amherst, indicating 
that a large number of minority group students need financial assis- 
tance. Arrangements for stipends or other remuneration are made at 
some medical schools. Grants from various foundations were suggested 
as sources of funds. 

Chairman Troy then introduced the final item on the agenda, 
Report of the School of Education, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-119). He 



briefly reviewed the drastic changes in the curriculum since Dean 
Allen's arrival in 1968. The Dean introduced Associate Deans Gentry 
and Seidman. The latter called attention to the completely revamped 
teacher education program, for which the School has recently received 
a distinguished award for excellence; also, to the placement report 
(Appendix B of T73-119), which reveals in the graduate area that, of 
228 respondents, only one was unemployed. Also, more than 90 are 
employed in Massachusetts in leadership positions. 

Dean Seidman added that a major responsibility is the 
recruitment of outstanding faculty where it is hoped to achieve a 
balance between "junior" and "senior" people. The School is fully 
accredited and has contributed its share of scholarly productions. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

New and innovative programs and methods are continually being devel- 
oped with increasing recognition of nonformal and life-time education 
oriented to the quality of human life. Efforts are directed toward 
balancing the School's contribution to the Commonwealth and to the 
University by providing quality education as inexpensively as possiblle 
Dean Allen reported that the School raises more than 60 percent of 
its budget through outside grants. A document was distributed list- 
ing programs funded from Massachusetts sources. The School is devel- 
oping other funding sources to replace the loss of federal money 
after this year. 

Trustee Abrams noted the competition for funds with other 
state teachers' colleges in the Commonwealth. The Dean expressed 
regret that public higher education institutions (community and state 
colleges and the University) are not able to cooperate as much as 
they would like. He added that the University differs from the state 
colleges in terms of its graduate offerings. This phase, he proposed 
should train leadership personnel through learning programs. The 
size of the undergraduate element should remain stable or be slightly 
reduced after 1980. The graduate level will be affected by the 
increasing demand for doctoral degrees for administrators. 

Dean Allen stated that between 50 and 55 percent of the 
undergraduate teachers are placed, having the advantage of the 
School's unique educative proces. This is at a time when 90 percent 
of those seeking employment as teachers have not been successful in 
finding it. 

Chairman Troy questioned the desirability of a 26:1 ratio 
of faculty to students. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern replied that the 
higher ratio is found in the social sciences as compared with the 
laboratory sciences; however, attempts are being made to reallocate 
positions to remedy the situation. 

Dr. Seidman, replying to President Wood's question on the 
ratio of applicants to admission, said that this year about 30 per- 
cent of the applicants were admitted; of these 80 percent actually 
enter the School. 

Responding to a question from Chairman Troy on the pass-fail 
system of grading, Dean Allen said that the School prefers the credit 
no record system. He added that no evidence has been found to show 
that the quality of education has been compromised; very few students 
use the program in a minimum way. The faculty also feels that knowl- 
edge alone is worthless without the ability to put it to use. 

The meeting was adjourned at 1:50 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary 



4071 



F & EP Comm. 
3-1-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Report of 
School of 
Education 
, (DOC. T73-119) 



4072 



COMMITTEE 



Fund Transfers 
(DOC. T73-126) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 

March 7, 1973; 10:30 a.m.; Massachusetts 4-H Youth Center 
Ashland, Massachusetts 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret; Trustees 
Crowley, Knowles, Lambson, Rowland; Treasurer Johnson, 
Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administration, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion,' 
Budget Director Gulko 

UM/Boston :' Acting Chancellor Hamilton 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:50 a.m. and 
presented the proposed Fund Transfers (DOC. T73-126) to the Committee 
He reported that, essentially, these transfers result from a midyear 
review of the financial status of the campuses and an attempt to 
adjust to the difficulties imposed upon the University's planning 
processes by the Shepard Amendments. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize the Amherst campus administration to 
implement those fund transfers necessary to revise 
the operating budget totals to the following amounts 
by subsidiary account: 



Account 

01 
02 
03 
04 
05 
06 
07 
08 
09 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



Revised Campus Budget 

$ 43,404,743 

814,101 

4,700,000 

1,500 

14,700 

107,530 

11,000 

2,612,800 

98,350 

196,315 

145,742 

723,617 

1,079,498 

702,825 

208,757 

1,095,346 



$ 55,916,824 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

fund transfers between subsidiary accounts recom- 
mended in Document T73-126 as detailed below all 
be approved : 

For UM/Boston: 



$249,000 



1 



Chairman Pumphret introduced the next item, Report of Inves 
ments (DOC. T73-125). He reported that the Investment Counsel had 



I 



From Accounts : 


01 


$105,500 




08 


93,500 




16 


50,000 


To Accounts : 


02 


$ 19,000 




03 


180,000 




14 


50,000 


For Office of the 


Pres 


ident : 


From Account : 


01 


$ 41,868 


To Accounts : 


13 


$ 2,740 




14 


24,963 
14,165 



$249,000 



$ 41,868 



$ 41,868 



recommended to the Treasurer the investment of $12,000, currently 
available in the University's portfolio, in additional purchases of 
common stock in existing holdings. After brief discussion, it was 
moved , seconded , and 

VOTED : To confirm the following purchases of common stock 

added to existing holdings made on advice of Invest- 
ment Counsel in their letter to Treasurer Kenneth 
W. Johnson dated February 5, 1973: 

BUY: 200 Shares, RCA 

200 Shares, Newmont 

The Chairman informed the Committee that Investment Counsel 
had also recommended that the University sell the current sixty-seven 
(67) shares held of Massachusetts Investors Trust. After brief 
discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize Treasurer Kenneth W. Johnson, on advice 
of Investment Counsel in letter to Treasurer Johnson 
dated February 5, 1973, to sell the gift of sixty- 
seven (67) shares of Massachusetts Investors Trust 
so that the proceeds may be added to the principal 
of the Barber Endowment Fund. 

The Chairman then called on Vice Chancellor Campion to 
present the final item on the agenda, Massachusetts Review, Inc. 



4073 

Finance Comm. 
3-7-73 



Fund Transfers 
(DOC. T73-126) 



- Report of 
Investments 
(DOC. T73-125) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Mass. Review, 
Inc. 



Finance Comm. 
3-7-73 

UM/ Amherst — 

Mass. Review, 

Inc. 

(DOC. T73-127) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

(DOC. T73-127). Mr. Campion explained that in 1962 the Board of 
Trustees had authorized annual support of the Massachusetts Review , 
fac . , in an amount not to exceed $10,000 from Research Trust Fund. 
?unds for the Massachusetts Review, Inc . , were treated as an agency 
account and management of its financial records was the responsibility 
if the Treasurer. The Vice Chancellor reported that, after ten years 
3f experience, it has been found that it is no longer necessary to 
ise an agency account. He said that the proposed vote had been 
reviewed in detail on campus. 

General discussion followed. Chairman Pumphret said that 
:he proposed change would allow for a more efficient method of handliijg 
:he account. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the following to be effective on or after 
March 7, 1973: 

That the Chancellor of the University of Massachu- 
setts at Amherst is authorized to furnish annual 
support to the Massachusetts Review, Inc . , in an 
amount not to exceed $10,000.00. Such support is 
contingent upon the following conditions: 

1. The annual budget of the Massachusetts Review , 
Inc . , must be approved in advance by the Chan- 
cellor of the University at Amherst, and by the 
Presidents of Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, 
and Smith Colleges as a Five College Project. 

2. The Massachusetts Review, Inc ., will appoint no 
University employee to a salaried position or 
pay any University employee on a regular basis 
for services rendered. 

3. The Massachusetts Review, Inc ., will continue 
to function as a Five College Project. 

4. The Massachusetts Review, Inc . , will provide 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst with 
a certified copy of the annual audit of the 
Review's books by an independent Certified Public 
Accounting firm and will provide access to the 
Review's accounting records to the University's 
Internal Auditors or Department of the State 
Auditor if requested to do so. 

5. The Massachusetts Review, Inc . , will provide to 
the University of Massachusetts at Amherst copies 
of its annual budget and financial reports . 



I 



1 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:15 a.m. 




Robert J. MfcQ'artney > ' 
Secretary, Board of Trustes 




I 



4075 



Finance Comm. 
3-7-73 



I 



4076 



COMMITTEE 



Report of the 
Pan-University 
Study Group for 
Review of Univer- 
sity Governance 
(DOC. T73-098B) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
March 7, 1973; 11:00 a.m.; 4-H Youth Center, Ashland 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President Woo T ; 
Trustees Haigis, Pumphret, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson 
Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Abrams, Chandler, Croce, Crowley, 
Kelly, Knowles, Lambson, Robertson, Shaler, Shearer, 
Snowden, Sullivan, Weldon; Mr. Callahan for Commissioner 
Anrig 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice Presidents Edelman and 
Phillips, Ms. Robinson, University Counsel Searson, 
Assistant Secretary Rawn 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Campion, 
Budget Director Gulko; Dr. Shapiro, rep. Faculty Senate; 
Prof. Wellman, member of Study Group 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Acting Vice Chan- 
cellor Marshall, Assoc. Provost Babcock; Prof. Lyons, rep. 
faculty; Prof. Broderick, member of Study Group 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

At 11:30 a.m., pending Chairman Healey's and President 
Wood's arrival, Assistant Secretary Rawn asked Trustee Knowles, a 
Trustee representative to the Study Group, to open discussion of the 
Report of the Pan-University Study Group for Review of University 



Governance (DOC. T73-098B) . Trustee Knowles objected to the proposed 



withdrawal of Board responsibility for the appointment of the Chan- 
cellors. Various changes in wording and President Wood's willingness 
to let the Trustees decide whether to keep or delegate the power to 
select the Chancellors have allayed her concerns. She thought this 
should still be a Trustee function. Trustee Troy added that, 
although it is unlikely that a President and the Board would disagree 
on the choice of a Chancellor, he would prefer not to delegate that 
Trustee power. 

Calling the Statement a "most major change in the governance 
of the University", Trustee Pumphret was concerned that the overall 
wording of the Statement is too general for specific interpretation. 
Further, he thinks it does not adequately protect the authority of 
the Chancellors. He urged an item-by-item review. 

Chairman Healey suggested that Study Group Chairman Wellman 
show how the processes would work in a typical though hypothetical 
situation. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Wellman noted that, prior to the beginning of the 70- 
Aay time period, there would have been communication through all the 
bodies concerned. President Wood concurred that there would be no 
najor change in the involvement of the Board or in the quality- 
control responsibilities of Trustee Troy's Committee; the change is 
sequensive, not authoritative. Mr. Wellman pointed out that all 
entities with disapproval authority are notified simultaneously. If 
nore than the specified time limit is needed, the recommendation can 
be returned to the appropriate campus for further consideration. 
Specific wording questioned by Trustee Pumphret was "render decisions" 
[I A 3) and "will mutually agree:" (I B 23). 

Trustee Croce proposed that the Board be timely informed 
on the status of any controversial action they would be expected to 
consider by providing an information sheet listing all of the check- 
points a controversial item had cleared before coming to the Board. 
Chairman Healey concurred, stressing that recommendations should 
have administrative clearance before the Board becomes involved. 
]'rof. Wellman reiterated that, by the time a recommendation is 
referred, it would already have had considerable exposure at all 
.evels. 



Replying to Trustee Troy' 
procedures, Chairman Healey said it 
notification to each entity of the 
Professor Wellman added that there 
nodif ication of a recommendation, 
concern about the action deadline, 
document specify a period spanning 
prior to final approval. President 
will retain the authority to revoke 



s question on actual referral 

would probably involve a formal 
final date for negative action, 
is also provision for Trustee 
Responding to Mr. Troy's continuing 
Chairman Healey proposed that the 
two Board of Trustees meetings 
Wood stressed that the Trustees 
any policy. 



Chancellor Bromery questioned whether everything would be 
referred to the Board rather than the present process of selective 
referral. Professor Broderick pointed out that the Board can con- 
sider what it wishes; the rest would be for their information. 

At this point, Trustee Knowles suggested that the document 
be tabled until the next meeting of the Committee. Chairman Healey 
declared that he is in sympathy with the purpose of the Statement, 
lie feels strongly that the Board should reserve its attention for 
najor problems of a policy nature. He proposed a serious drafting 
session in which he would participate with the Study Group and anyone 
who might have serious reservations about the language in the document 
In an effort to clear up specific problems. Trustee Rowland agreed, 
>ut requested that the Trustees first have an opportunity to discuss 
he issue privately among themselves. President Wood noted that the 
! Study Group has been in contiruous consultation with Chairman Healey 
md himself. The Group has also met with other Trustees. He urged 
::inal action on the Statement in the near future. Trustee Knowles 
■issured him that the document has great merit but obviously does not 
lave unanimous, overall Trustee support. She suggested a delay of 



4077 

Exec. Comm. 
3-7-73 



Report of the 
Pan-University 
Study Group for 
Review of 
University 
Governance 
(DOC. T73-098B) 



4 78 

Exec. Comm. 
3-7-73 

Report of the 
Pan-University 
Study Group 
for Review of 
UniversddiyMiTTEE 
Governance 
(DOC. T73-098B) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

four weeks. Chairman Healey 'proposed another drafting session to 
deal with semantics followed by an executive session of the Board to 
consider the philosophical aspects. President Wood stated that he 
had promised the Study Group that the Board would not adopt the plan 
"in principle." 

Chancellor Bromery, UM/ Amherst, observed that most of the 
procedures outlined in the Statement are already in effect on the 
Amherst campus. His only concerns are (1) that the mechanics effect 
a smooth coordination of all segments and (2) that the authority of 
the Chancellor not be eroded. 

Trustee Pumphret inquired whether Richard Howland, 
Attorney for Students, UM/Amherst, had reviewed the document. He 
urged his involvement, adding that student interpretation would be 
important. He concurred with Mrs. Rowland that the Trustees should 
talk together privately. 

Dr. Bromery proceeded to read a memorandum of February 12, 
1973, written to the Study Group by Dr. Gage in which the Vice Chan- 
cellor expressed concern about "primary responsibility" being dele- 
gated to students by Section B 8. Dr. Gage suggested that "subject 
to the approval of the Chancellor" be inserted or that students be 
given the "initiative for recommending." Professor Wellman stated 
that he had talked at length with Dr. Gage on this subject. He 
stressed that the concept of "primary responsibility" carried with 
it the concept of "subject to the approval of the Chancellor," but 
that this could be inserted specifically. 

Trustee Kelly inquired how the University Assembly, UM/ 
Boston, which is composed of about 60 percent faculty, could vote on 
something for which students have "primary responsibility." Pro- 
fessor Wellman mentioned the Amherst campus arrangement of a separate 
Student Senate. Trustee Pumphret then expressed concern that the 
Student Senate could inundate the Chancellor with recommendations 
which he would disapprove, thus exposing him to student disapproval. 
Chairman Healey suggested a definitions section; however, Professor 
Broderick called attention to the statement in Section B 5 which 
clarifies the intent of the term "primary responsibility." Trustee 
Pumphret reiterated his concern, based strongly on the continuing 
change in the student body as classes graduate. Mr. Healey commented 
that, since he has had the advantage of several conferences with the 
Study Group, he is not as deeply concerned with definitions; however, 
he agreed that the meaning and intent of certain words in the docu- 
ment should be clarified. Although recognizing the importance of 
Trustee review, Professor Wellman urged the Trustees to act on the 
proposed Statement as soon as possible. He assured them that, 
basically, the present alignments and responsibilities are not 
changed by the document. He added that resolution of this matter 
might have an influence on the issue of collective bargaining at 
UM/Amherst. 



I 



iMITTEE 



I! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Healey expressed reluctance to take a legalistic 
Approach, declaring that the Board must be able to rely on the good 
will of all entities involved in the governance process. It was 
agreed to proceed with an informal working session, followed by an 
executive session of the Board at which final action would be expected 

Secretary McCartney introduced two new Trustees present 
Koday; present for their first meeting today: Mr. Gavin D. Robertson 
of Worcester, who replaces General Maginnis, and Mr. Michael P. 
Sullivan of Amherst, who succeeds Merle Howes as Chairman of the Board 
q>f Selectmen of the Town of Amherst. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
frank discussion of the proposed Statement on 
University Governance, and formulation of pro- 
cedures to give further consideration to the 
document. 

After appropriate and extended discussion, it was 

VOTED ; To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of adjournment. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:35 p.m. 



II 





artney v 
oard of Trust* 



4079 



Exec. Comm. 
3-7-73 

Report of the 
Pan-University 
Study Group for 
Review of 
University 
Governance 
(DOC. T73-098B) 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Status Report 
on Student 
Support Services 
(DOC. T73-133) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
March 19, 1973; 12:00 p.m.; President's Office, Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 
Wood; Trustees Chandler, Shaler, Snowden, Ladd, Kelly, 
Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Mr. Tim Williams, 
Assistant to the Acting Chancellor 



Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 12:45 p.m. and 
called upon Acting Chancellor Hamilton to comment on the Report on 
Student Support Services (DOC. T73-133) , submitted from the Boston 



campus. Dr. Hamilton explained that he had asked the staff respon- 
sible for its particular area in student affairs to comment on the 
current situation in their department and the future status. This 
was done, according to the Acting Chancellor, so that the Board of 
Trustees would not receive a filtered view. Dr. Hamilton said that 
as useful and valuable as the Gage Committee Report and the recom- 
mendations were to the campus, the advent of the college system and 
an administration of an Acting Chancellor had prevented a total 
adoption of its recommendations. There are now three Deans at the 
campus with different views of the kinds of services necessary for 
their students. Dr. Hamilton noted, however, that there is a great 
opportunity for further development of support services in the future 
but that the situation now can be described as being in a state of 
flux. 

Chairman Rowland asked the Committee to comment on the 
Progress Report. General discussion followed. 

Trustee Ladd inquired as to whether there had been an 
analysis of the kinds of constituencies and their needs present at 
the Boston campus. In response, Dr. Hamilton said that there are 
various pieces of an analysis but that they haven't been compiled 
into an overall scheme. He recommended that the first step to take 
would be to hire a Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs who would 
undertake such an analysis and review. 

In response to a question raised by Committee members on 
what had actually been done as a result of the Gage Report, Dr. 
Hamilton pointed out that the major advances were the: (1) reorgani- 
zation and regrouping of student support services; and (2) the 
recommendation of all the positions recommended by the Gage Committee 
in the Boston Campus FY 1974 Budget Request. 



! 



F 



! 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Hamilton also reported that at the present time there 
is no mechanism established for the evaluation of the various support 
services. 

President Wood said that the Gage report represents an 
initiative on the part of this Committee and the President to respond 
to a situation at the Boston campus that needed attention; that is th£ 
area of counseling and advising, particularly of minority students. 
He informed the Committee that he is more optimistic now and feels 
that this report indicates that the colleges and the various depart- 
ments are seriously considering the statement made by the Board last 
May. 

The President also stated that it is to Dr. Hamilton's 
credit that reorganization has gotten underway despite the advent of 
the college system and the absence of a Chancellor. He said that 
the Committee would now have to address itself to the fact that 
specific detail guidelines have not been forthcoming for implementa- 
tion. Dr. Wood feels that a clear statement by the Board of Trustees 
and the President is needed to implement the already existing policy. 

Chairman Rowland expressed concern that not much has been 
done to improve the situation in counseling since the Board passed 
its statement. 

President Wood pointed out some things have taken place 
such as (1) improvement in the health services; (2) progress in the 
guidance area; and (3) activities supported by the student tax have 
improved such as the day-care center. He reminded the Committee that 
the Boston campus has had limited resources and no overall direction 
in student affairs. 



Vice President Edelman observed that the Committee has only 
focused on two of the many areas in student services. He suggested, 
however, that in reference to counseling, that there are at least 
three other areas in which a follow-up Trustee statement could be 
made including (a) the utilization of faculty positions for counsel- 
ing; (b) the redefining of roles; and (c) the centralization versus 
decentralization of support services. Mr. Edelman also suggested 
that the Trustees might want to make a statement of concern on the 
hiring practices at the Boston campus as that area will be increasing 
in the near future. 

General discussion followed on a proposed statement. The 
Trustees expressed concern in the following areas: admissions, trans- 
fer students, the relationship of the University vis-a-vis the state 
colleges , multi-purpose counseling centers and creation of the 
Office of Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. 

Chairman Rowland stated that the Board had passed a policy 
statement last year calling for improvements in the counseling, 
advising and support services. She felt that this mandate allowed 
for the establishment of a Vice Chancellor at Boston as a necessary 



4081 



Stu. Act. 
3-19-73 



Comm. 



UM/Boston — 
Status Report 
on Student 
Support Services 
(DOC. T73-133) 



4082 



Stu. Act. Comm. 
3-19-73 

UM/Boston — 
Status Report 
on Student 
Support 
Services 
(DOC. T73-133) 

COMMITTEE 



Discussion of 
the Role of 
the Committee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

means to achieve the objectives of the policy. It was observed that 
the selection of such a Vice Chancellor would have to follow the 
search committee route. 

The Committee was in general agreement that Vice President 
Edelman would prepare a draft statement for the Committee to review 
prior to submission to the Board at the April meeting. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton expressed regret that he couldn' 
answer all the Trustees' questions and concerns but he felt that it 
was important to let the Committee know what the current status of 
support services was at Boston. 

In concluding the discussion of the report, Chairman Rowlanji 
expressed concern that it would be almost another year before things 
changed, but that she was hopeful the support services would change. 

Chairman Rowland turned to the next item on the agenda, a 
Discussion of the Role of the Committee. She explained that over the 



past few months she has been examining the need for a Student Activ- 
ities Committee as such. Mrs. Rowland reminded the Committee of the 
various efforts expanded over the past few years and of the accom-^ 
plishments for the students such as the 24-hour open house, co-ed 
dormitories, etc. Since then, Mrs. Rowland said, the Committee has 
been further removed from the campuses and more involved in policy- 
making where she feels it belongs. She asked the Committee members 
to comment. 

Trustee Snowden explained that she was concerned that the 
process of decision-making at the Committee level prior to approval 
by the full Board not be lost. She said that it was important to 
have a committee work and discuss the "nitty-gritty" of any issue and 
then make recommendations to the full Board. 

President Wood observed that the Committee structure would 
be even more central to the Board's functioning as a result of the 
Wellman report if it were adopted by the Board. He commended the 
Student Activities Committee for their hard work and dedication to 
the concerns of students. 

Trustee Chandler pointed out that many problems are antic- 
ipated with the new Columbia Point campus reflecting student life in 
general. This Committee, he feels, would be asked to deal with them. 
Trustee Shaler added that one of the most important roles of this 
Committee would be one of evaluation. He said that the Boston campus 
needs for support from the Committee were greater than at Amherst at 
the present time. 

It was observed that although the Committee had initiated 
a policy statement last year on support services, it was still 
necessary for them to evaluate and review progress as shown today. 
Vice President Edelman noted that the implementation of a policy is 
just as difficult as the development of an initial policy statement. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Following the discussion, Mrs. Rowland thanked the Committee 
or attending and said that further discussion on the purpose of the 
tudent Activities Committee would be taken up at a later time. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 



1 




Robert J. Mi 
Secretary, 



4083 

Stu. Act. Comm. 
3-19-73 



I 



4084 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT AND UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

March 21, 1973; 2:00 pirn.; President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Gordon, President 
Wood; Trustees Chandler, Kelly, Robertson, Troy; 
Secretary McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Lashman; Mr. Cass, 
Ms . Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Mr. Douglas Forsyth, Assistant to the Chan- 
cellor; Mr. Sidney Myers, Staff Attorney 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton; Prof. Lyons, 
faculty rep.; Mr. Timothy Williams, Assistant to the Acting 
Chancellor 

UM/Worcester: Dean Soutter 



2:35 p.m. 



The Committee was called to order by Chairman Gordon at 



Mr. Cass enumerated and presented detailed explanation of 
legislative bills filed during the current session which are of 
interest to the University of Massachusetts. 

Chairman Gordon spoke briefly concerning activity and 
discussion at a recent meeting of the Board of Higher Education. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:08 p.m. 



I 



I 




Robert J. Mc 
Secretary, B 





rtney 

of Trustees 



F 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
March 30, 1973; 12 noon; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood; 
Trustees Boyden, Kelly, Ladd, Lambson, Shaler; Mr. Callahan 
for Commissioner Anrig; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Mss. 
Robinson and Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
Prof. Burke, rep. Faculty Senate; Dean Jeremiah Allen, Arts 
and Sciences; Profs. David Knauf (Chairman, Theatre), 
Doris Abramson (Theatre), William Naff (Chairman, Asian 
Studies), Maurice Shelby (Speech), Dean Alfange (Acting 
Head, Economics); Dean Bischoff, Physical Education; Prof. 
Buck, Chairman, Academic Matters Committee, Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Assoc. Provost 
Babcock; Prof. Lyons, rep. faculty; Prof. Robbins; Dean 
Strange (CPCS), Ass't Dean Chapman (CPCS); Profs. Buchanan, 
Foster, Taylor (CPCS); Ms. Mahoney (CPCS) 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Troy convened the meeting at 12:35 p.m. and invitee 
President Wood to introduce discussion on the Tenure Planning Review 
(DOCS. T73-143A and B). He referred to the policies and directions 
of the Board voted on November 21, 1972 (DOC. T73-069), initiating 
the development of long-range plans which can serve only as guidelines 
Eor the tenure recommendations now before the Committee. The UM/ 
Boston recommendations, however, will be deferred for review by 
Chancellor-designate Golino. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, UM/Amherst, reviewed the process 
followed at the Amherst campus in tenure recommendations. These were 
carried out in the context of the five-year plans developed by depart 
oents and schools, but, of necessity, reflecting former policies and 
expectations. Dr. Gluckstern emphasized the careful and individual 
onsideration given to each recommendation in line with the person's 
oast contributions and promise of future accomplishments, along with 
some awareness of expectations projected at the time of recruitment. 

Turning to the document, the Vice Chancellor explained that 
Chancellor Bromery is temporarily withholding the tenure recommenda- 
tions from the School of Engineering. This leaves 73 recommendations 
for tenure. 

Dr. Gluckstern also stated that various statistics (age 
iistributions, number for consideration, etc.) are being developed. 



4085 



Tenure Planning 
Review UM/A, 
UM/B 

(DOCS. T73-143A 
and B) 



4086 

F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 



Tenure Planning 

Review UM/A, 

UM/B 

(DOCS. T73-143A 

and B) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Projections indicate stabilization at a tenure percentage of 60% to 
70%. However, this will be affected by such possibilities as early 
retirement and term appointments. An exchange program with UM/Bostor 
will provide opportunities for departmental change and innovation 
without affecting the tenure situation. 

At President Wood's suggestion, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
also mentioned four new appointments with tenure being recommended 
in the Department of Economics: effective September 1, 1973, Dr. 
Stephen A. Resnick, Professor, and Dr. Richard W. Wolff, Associate 
Professor; and effective September 1, 1974, Dr. Samuel Bowles, Pro- 
fessor, and Dr. Herbert Gintis , Associate Professor. They have 
indicated to Dr. Alfange, Acting Head of the Department, their will- 
ingness to come as a group. Dr. Gluckstern stressed the important 
contribution of these young and talented economists toward broadening 
the Department's offerings in line with student interest. Dr. Wood 
added his endorsement. Trustee Lambson cautioned that a balance 
should be maintained between concern for student interest and concerr. 
for academic quality. The Vice Chancellor assured him that an 
extremely careful evaluation establishing scholarship in each case 
has been made. They will permit course offerings outside the highly 
abstract mathematical area now available. In addition, Dr. Gluck- 
stern presented the name of Dr. Harvey B. Scribner for appointment as 
Professor of Education with Tenure to the Center of Educational 
Leadership, effective September 1, 1973. 

Replying to Trustee Ladd, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern pointed 
out that 11 tenure recommendations were refused last year compared 
with the 23 to 25 this year. This trend, he said, represents a 
gradual refinement process based on individual evaluation combined 
with recruitment expectations and institutional needs and goals. 

For UM/Boston, Associate Provost Babcock reported that the 
development of a tenure policy is being undertaken concurrently with 
curricular and program development studies in all departments. This 
and other issues still under discussion are referred to in Acting 
Vice Chancellor Marshall's statement (DOC. T73-143B). As soon as th^ 
individual departments become structured, campuswide collegiate and 
personnel planning documents will be developed. Chairman Troy noted 
that the situation is further complicated by the ambiguous situation 
in the graduate area for which a University -wide plan will be sub- 
mitted to the Board in May. 

Ms. Robinson, for the President's Office, mentioned 
general concurrent concern with tenure trends and implications among 
other state institutions of higher education as well as the joint 
commission of the Association of American Colleges and the AAUP, 
which will issue next month a report containing recommendations. Sh£ 
noted the difficulty faced by the campuses in responding to the 
Trustees' new tenure policy because of the lack of precedent and 
established procedures. She commended Vice Chancellor Gluckstern, 
UM/ Amherst, for the planning materials sent to departments in the 
fall, and Vice Chancellor Marshall for the preparation of the planning 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

review, particularly the statistical profiles. She noted some criti- 
cal points highlighted by the tenure planning documents : the continu 
ing increase in tenure at UM/Amherst and the difficulty of relating 
planning to the individual tenure recommendations; the young average 
age of the faculty at UM/Boston and the large proportions of the 
faculty who will be eligible for tenure simultaneously. In general, 
the individual department plans are useful and of considerable 
interest; the college and campus plans are more general and will need 
further development in the future. She stated that the planning 
effort was clearly important and worthwhile. President Wood added 
that the different problems faced by the "developing campus" (UM/ 
Boston and UM/Worcester) as compared with the "mature campus" (UM/ 
Amherst) obviously preclude the use of quotas or formulas. 

Associate Provost Babcock called attention to the commit- 
ment for a general liberal arts education in the developing programs 
at UM/Boston and to the distribution of tenure percentages, 1972-73, 
by departments and Colleges (DOC. T73-143B, p. 2), which substantiate 
the importance of considering each department individually. Vice 
President Edelman, while commending the overall UM/Boston presenta- 
tion, expressed concern that decisions at UM/Amherst might be too 
strongly influenced by expectations at recruitment. He noted that 
UM/Amherst appeared to be granting tenure to three out of four can- 
didates; UM/Boston, to two out of three — a fairly significant dif- 
ference in percentage. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern explained that 
(1) recruitment this year, except for the three appointments already 
mentioned, will be at the nontenured level; (2) several resignations 
and retirements of tenured faculty are expected; and (3) a number of 
UM/Amherst faculty members will be involved in exchanges with UM/ 
Boston. Chancellor Bromery added that the two campuses are very 
different and that individual evaluation is essential in the interest 
of maintaining the best possible faculty. 

Associate Provost Babcock commented that the performance 
of junior faculty (traditional or innovative) is affected by their 
tenure expectations. Dr. Gluckstern added that faculty uncertain of 
tenure usually follow the traditional course because of their concern 
about relocation options. Trustee Lambson declared his belief in 
individual rather than collective consideration. Mr. Lyons pointed 
out that the planning reports will indicate each department's policy 
regarding tenure. Ms. Robinson indicated that Father Walsh had 
questioned whether the present tenure recommendations have taken into 
consideration a comparison with members of the department becoming 
eligible for tenure in the near future. Associate Provost Babcock 
assured her that the long-range planning review has that effect 
since it relates the curriculum to the staffing pattern. 

Trustee Boyden inquired whether new faculty view tenure, 
professional advancement, and salary increases as being synonymous. 
Mr. Lyons replied that advancements in title and salary would 



408? 

F & EP Coram. 
3-30-73 



Tenure Planning 

Review UM/A, 

UM/B 

(DOCS. T73-143A 

and B) 



4088 

F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 



Tenure Planning 

Review UM/A, 

UM/B 

(DOCS. T73-143A 

and B) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

naturally be construed to imply a favorable tenure decision; however 
it should not be taken for granted. Mr. Burke remarked that, with 
knowledge of a more stringent approach to tenure, new faculty may 
stay only a few years and not wait for a decision, thus contributing 
to the stabilization of the tenure percentage. 

Replying to Trustee Ladd, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
explained that credit is given toward tenure for service up to 
three years at another accredited institution; also, that part-time 
service is accumulated to the equivalent full-time requirement for 
consideration (six years) , if related to the previous anti-nepotism 
policy. Mr. Ladd also asked how teaching performance is measured 
at UM/Amherst. Dean Allen replied that many departments maintain 
a systematic and thorough evaluation; however, there is no overall 
requirement to do this. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern stated that 
teaching was an important consideration in the tenure evaluations 
and that, overall, one-third of those being recommended have their 
major strength in teaching; one-third in scholarship; and one-third 
in service. He also noted that the required memorandum from the 
Department Head or Chairman and, in many cases, the chairman of the 
personnel committee, include a detailed assessment of teaching 
ability. Associate Provost Bischoff added that the file on each can- 
didate includes all the report forms on which teaching is the first 
item. 

Trustee Ladd then questioned what has been done to 
encourage ways in which student participation in personnel policy 
decisions can be broadened. Vice Chancellor Gluckstern replied that 
he now has information on student participation on departmental 
personnel committees. He will be getting back to those departments 
where it appears to be inadequate. Mr. Ladd urged student input, 
especially for those faculty whose recommendations are based strongljr 
on interaction with students; i.e., advising, counseling, teaching, 
etc. He added that, while his term as a Trustee is about to end, 
he hopes his successor will pursue implementation of the directions 
voted on November 21, 1972 (DOC. T7 3-069, paragraph 4) to provide 
a more sharply defined role for student participation. Chancellor 
Bromery assured the Committee of his interest and cooperation in 
this regard. 

On determination of President Wood's endorsement, it was 
moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the tenure recommendations for UM/Amherst, 
effective September 1, 1974, as listed in DOC. T73- 
143A, with the exception of the School of Engineering. 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve appointments with tenure in the Depart- 
ment of Economics for Dr. Samuel Bowles and Dr. 
Herbert Gintis, effective September 1, 1974, and 



I 



=OMMITTEE 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

for Dr. Stephen A. Resnick and Dr. Richard W. 
Wolff, effective September 1, 1973; and in the 
School of Education for Dr. Harvey B. Scribner, 
effective September 1, 1973 

The Committee then turned to consideration of the Proposed 
Change in the University Sabbatical Leave Policy (DOC. T73-065). 



I 



Vice Chancellor Gluckstern explained that, with the concurrence of 
Father Walsh and Acting Vice' Chancellor Marshall, provision is made 
for a review of the individual leave proposal and for crediting 
part-time service toward eligibility. In addition, minor changes are 
necessary to bring the policy into line with the present administra- 
tive structure. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that section 
2 of the University of Massachusetts Sabbatical 
Leave Policy which now reads , "The opportunity shall 
be available to all full-time faculty members who 
hold the rank of Instructor or above, and who have 
given the University six years of full-time service, 
as detailed in Document T70-130," be reworded and 
expanded as follows: 

2. All members of the professional staff who hold 
the rank of Instructor or above, and who have 
given the University at least six years of 
service, shall be considered eligible for 
sabbatical leave and may apply. Sabbatical 
leaves will be awarded after thorough review 
and evaluation of the merits of the individual 
leave proposal. 

3. Full-time faculty previously on part-time 
appointments will be given equivalent credit 
for part-time service (e.g., eight years at 
1/2 time and two years at full time = six 
years) and will be eligible for sabbatical 
leave based on current full-time salary. Part- 
time faculty will be eligible for sabbatical 
leave based on part-time salary after six 
years of part-time service. 

It was further agreed that the University's Sabbatical 
Leave Policy will be updated to reflect the intent of the Delegation 
of Authority Document T71-115. 

On Chairman Troy's invitation, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
introduced Dr. David Knauf , Chairman of the Theatre Program, to 
speak for the Establishment of the Department of Theatre in the 
Faculty of Humanities and Fine Arts, UM/ Amherst (DOC. T73-139). 
This move from the Department of Speech in the Faculty of Social and 
Behavioral Sciences is proposed in order to facilitate administra- 
tive procedures and has the support of the Faculty Senate and the 



4089 



F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 

Tenure Planning 
Review UM/A, 
UM/B 

(DOCS. T73-143A 
and B) 



Proposed Change 

in University 

Sabbatical Leave 

Policy 

(DOC. T73-065) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Establishment 
of Department 
of Theatre in 
Faculty of 
Humanities and 
Fine Arts 
(DOC. T73-139) 



F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Establishment 
of Department 
of Theatre in 
Faculty of 
HumaiSttHJF'Siid 
Fine Arts 
(DOC. T73-139) 



UM/Amherst — 
Major in 
Chinese, Major 
in Japanese, 
Certificate in 
Asian Studies 
(DOC. T73-140) 



UM/Amherst — 
Name Change: 
Department of 
Speech to ! 
Department of 
Communication 
Studies 
(DOC. T73-141) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Provost's Office. Dr. Knauf recalled that the placement of the 
Theatre program with Speech occurred when the College of Arts and 
Sciences divided into three faculties. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the move' of the Theatre Program from the 
Department of Speech in the Faculty of Social 
and Behavioral Sciences as an independent depart- 
ment in the Faculty of Humanities and Fine Arts 
of the College of Arts and Sciences, UM/Amherst. 

Dr. Gluckstern then referred questions regarding the Major 
in Chinese, the Major in Japanese, and the Certificate in Asian 



Studies, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-140) to Dr. William Naff, Chairman of 
the Asian Studies Program. Replying to President Wood, Dr. Naff 
stated that, this being only the fourth year of operation, the upper- 
level undergraduate classes are small, having about 15 students. One 
function of the course is to fill the need for a knowledge of Chinese 
and Japanese for students in other disciplines and in the Five-Colleg<; 
Program. Also, about 10 to 12 students are expected to designate 
each language as their undergraduate major as soon as it is approved. 
Except for a beginning course in Chinese at Smith College, only the 
University offers Asian language courses. Dr. Gluckstern noted extreme 
concern from the other area colleges that the program be continued. 
Dr. Naff stated that about 20-30 percent of the enrollments are off- 
campus students. The Certificate in Asian Studies will provide a 
ninor in the discipline, will identify interested students, and will 
sring those students into the advising program. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve a Major in Chinese, a Major in Japanese, 
and a Certificate in Asian Studies in the Asian 
Studies Program in the Faculty of Social and 
Behavioral Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, 
UM/Amherst. 

The request for the Name Change: Department of Speech to 
Department of Communication Studies, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-141) was 



presented by Mr. Shelby of that Department. The word "Studies" was 
added in response to objection from the Electrical Engineering facult)' 
because of their interest in electrical communication. Mr. Shelby 
explained that the Department is divided into three distinct areas of 
study: (1) communication and rhetorical theory, (2) mass communicat 
and (3) communication disorders — all of which are concerned with the 
sasic concept of communication. 

Following brief comment, it was moved, seconded, and 



xons , 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the name change from the Department of 
Speech to the Department of Communication Studies 
in the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences , 
College of Arts and Sciences, UM/Amherst. 

Regarding the Request from the School of Engineering to 
! )rop the Degree Program in Aerospace Engineering, UM/Amherst (DOC. 



T73-142), Vice Chancellor Gluckstern explained that there has not 
seen sufficient interest shown to continue this offering as a degree 
urogram; however, the course will still be available. On motion made 
md seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the deletion of the Degree Program in 
Aerospace Engineering in the Department of 
Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering of the School 
of Engineering, UM/Amherst. 

The Committee then turned to consideration of Credit for 
10TC Courses, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-124). Chancellor Bromery referred 



o the original action (originally voted by the Faculty Senate on 
November 20, 1969, and January 29, 1970, and approved by the Board of 
Trustees on May 29, 1970) which was reaffirmed by the Senate on 
April 27, 1972, and supported by the Board on May 10, 1972, termina- 
:ing academic credit for courses taught by the Division of Military 
ind Air Science. 

Both the Student Senate (March 21, 1973) and Faculty Senate 
(February 25, 1973) now feel that action was unfairly discriminatory. 
Both bodies have voted to restore academic credit for the courses on 
:he basis of established standards enforced through the mechanism of 
faculty review. The Committee was asked to recommend rescission of 
the May 10, 1972, vote of the Trustees which would automatically 
refer implementation of the Senates' action to the Chancellor.' 
Associate Provost Bischoff noted that the Academic Matters Committee 
of the Faculty Senate maintains a Subcommittee on Military Affairs 
specifically charged with reviewing R0TC matters on the Amherst cam- 
jus; this committee unanimously recommended restoration of credit and 
the regular academic review process. 

Discussion ensued reflecting the concern of several Trustees 
(Shaler, Troy and Lambson) regarding the permanence of the latest 
request and whether or not campus feeling may be influenced by world 
affairs. Dr. Bischoff said that it was a move to restore consistency 
Ln the overall course offerings to undergraduates. 

Trustee Ladd maintained that the arguments for and against 
10TC in the Faculty Senate have been exactly the same over four years , 
rhe only change has been in the nature of the Vietnam War. Mr. Burke 
jointed out the efforts made by the Division of Military and Air 
Science to improve the quality of its courses and faculty in response 
to the concern of the Faculty Senate so that its academic standards 



4091 



F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Name Change: 
Department of 
Speech to 
Department of 
Communication 
Studies 
(DOC. T73-141) 

UM/Amherst — 
Request from 
School of Engi- 
neering to Drop 
Degree Program 
in Aerospace 
Engineering 
(DOC. T73-142) 



UM/Amherst — 

Credit for ROTC 

Courses 

(DOC. T73-124) 



4092 

F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 



UM/Amherst — 

Credit for ROTC 

Courses 

(DOC. T73-124) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

would be comparable to other programs on the campus. Dr. Buck, 
Chairman of the Academic Matters Committee of the Faculty Senate, 
concurred that a tremendous effort has been made. (However, it was 
noted that the Faculty Senate recently refused to disband the Sub- 
committee on Military Affairs.) Chancellor Bromery remarked that, 
contrary to some expectations, the withdrawal of academic credit did 
not remove ROTC from the campus. Also, Dr. Bischoff stated that 
women are now eligible to become cadets although there are none at 
UM/Amherst. 

Vice President Edelman expressed concern about reversing 
a decision taken on the basis of carefully documented evidence last 
year. At that time there was a distinct difference in the quality 
of ROTC courses in contrast with most other University offerings. 

Chairman Troy inquired whether a request for more specifics 
before making a recommendation to the Board would be detrimental to 
students. Associate Provost Bischoff replied that the credits will 
be allowed if the Board rescinds its previous action and might be a 
deciding factor toward graduation. However, there was a question on 
the retroactivity of the action unless specifically voted. President 
Wood concurred with Chancellor Bromery that the basic issue of course 
credit belongs with the faculty. The Board's action last May, he 
said, reflected the considered judgment of the faculty at that time 
and a number of Trustees acceded against their own personal prefer- 
ence. He agreed with Mr. Edelman that, in preparation for a recom- 
mendation at the May 1973 meeting, the Trustees should have (1) com- 
plete documentation on ROTC course contents showing changes since 
last spring and (2) information on the effect of alternative deci- 
sions on cadets already in the program. Mr. Buck pointed out that 
the credits in question amount to only eight to twelve over the 
four-year college experience; cadets have established majors outside 
the ROTC program. 

The Committee agreed generally that, although the Faculty 
Senate's decision would probably be supported, they wish to receive 
more supportive information. Chancellor Bromery, Associate Provost 
Bischoff, and Messrs. Burke and Buck assured the Committee that they 
and the Faculty Senate realize the sensitivities surrounding the 
request for rescission; also, that ROTC staff candidates and ROTC 
courses have been screened more stringently than those for other 
programs. Material as requested will be provided as soon as possible 

During the previous discussion, Trustee Ladd raised a 
question on the definition of "learning experience" as related to 
awarding credit for previous military service. Chairman Troy said 
that he intends to request the Amherst administration to report to 
the Committee on all one-credit courses being offered — what they are 
who teaches them, and how they are approved. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



I 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Troy then requested Dean Strange to present the 
College III Curriculum Report, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-137) . There have 



been three major developments since the report made to the Committee 
in January (DOC. T73-102) : (1) the specif icational certificates and 
related administrative procedures, (2) the faculty organizational 
plan, and (3) a slightly revised governance procedure. 

The 15 specific proficiency skills to be acquired for 
certification in each of the six concentrations are outlined on 
pages 4-10 of the document. He referred to the first four certifi- 
cates as being a row rather than a column (which he explained later). 
This initial attempt to specify the type of information and skills 
expected of students has been particularly difficult and will be a 
continuing process as experience is acquired by both faculty and stu- 
dents. Evaluation procedures for determining proficiency in the com- 
petency areas appear on page 11 of the report and will be developed 
through application. Administration of the system will rest with a 
Certificate Council (for details, see pages 12-14). This program is 
completely innovative, Dean Strange said, and the College is aware 
that a review following two or three years of experience may require 
moving to another system. He stressed that the faculty will be 
required to provide much advisory support to the students, particularly 
during the first year of operation. 

Turning to faculty organization, Dean Strange explained the 
two-part, column-and-row arrangement devised for College III to meet 
the need for a departmental structure comparable to Colleges I and II 
(see Organization Chart, page 36). The faculty are grouped into six 
to ten general areas (columns) for three purposes: (1) administrative 
and personnel unit, (2) electoral unit, and (3) collegial unit. (The 
Dean noted that a potential difficulty is the absence of the usual 
discipline orientation and protection.) Each column (with a faculty 
of 16 to 30) would elect its own chairman. The Dean would appoint 
chairmen for the rows : (or specialty areas) who would be allocated 
personnel (called partial lines) and would negotiate with the columns 
for faculty members. Various combinations of assignment were then 
detailed by Dean Strange. The importance of having good integration 
between the Centers' programs (rows) and the academic program of the 
College (columns) was stressed. 

Governance will be vested in a Policy Board (pages 15-17) 
which will (1) advise the University about hiring and retention of 
the Dean, (2) make major policy recommendations to the Dean including 
review of the budget, and (3) act as a review body at the end of the 
year for the Certificate Council and the curricular areas (of both 
rows and columns) and will make major recommendations for change. 

In concluding his report, Dean Strange noted that College 
Ill's needs for staffing, both professional and classified, will be 
significant, especially during the first year. It will be impossible 
for the College to open in September and operate efficiently without 
the necessary administrative support. He also noted that the evalu- 
ation methods are still being developed, and that an alternative 



4093 

F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 

UM/Boston — 
College III 
Curriculum Report 
(DOC. T73-137) 



F & EP Coram. 
3-30-73 

UM/Boston — 
College III 
Curriculum Report 
(DOC. T73-137) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

tenure plan has been submitted to the University Counsel. Meanwhile, 
signed statements of agreement with whatever tenure policy is 
adopted are already being required of faculty appointees. Also, 
agreements are in process with area colleges to cooperate with 
College III regarding field experience and faculty cooperation. 

Replying to Trustee Kelly's question on student recruitment 
procedure, Dean Strange said that final decisions on acceptances wil] 
be made in about six weeks. A large number of applicants have 
requested transfer from Colleges I or II, UM/Boston. Some first- 
year requests have specified only College III and some have expressed 
only interest in College III. Publicity about College III has gone 
to the Mass Media , most state agencies, a number of community orga- 
nizations and groups, and some city agencies. It is expected that 
200-250 will be over-college-age admissions. Transfer students will 
number about 25 who should be made aware of the potential difficulties 
in transferring out of a certification system. Every student will 
be interviewed this year; however, this will probably be the most 
restrictive year for admissions. 



,«■.=« ._llcih 6 .i.h 6 the connotation "problem 
mora suitable to the recognition, not 



Trustee Lambson suggested changing 
solving" to some wording more suitable to the ictug 
necessarily the solving, of urban affairs problems. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton pointed out that approval of tht: 
College III proposal has not yet been requested from the University 
Assembly. His concern was that a Committee recommendation might be 
interpreted as an endorsement of the program, which will, of neces- 
sity, be affected by budgetary considerations at UM/Boston. Presi- 
dent Wood assured him that, while preliminary review of the report 
has been limited, the concepts of governance, certification, and 
faculty organization will benefit from comments made by the Committed 
and others present. Trustee approval at this time does not replace 
a formal review of the College III Constitution nor does ±t consti- 
tute specific endorsement of the academic program. It does repre- 
sent, however, a general authorization to proceed with the develop- 
ment and planning of the College. Dr. Wood also mentioned that an 
interpretation by Counsel will be needed of whether the proposal 
represents a curriculum change or the development of a University 
program. 

Dean Strange noted that, as required by the UM/Boston Con- 
stitution, the CPCS program was approved by acceptance of the Jeffer- 
son Committee Report by the University Assembly on October 7, 1971. 
Referring to another constitutional requirement that the University 
Assembly review on-going programs at large, he emphasized it has been 
agreed that this does not refer to specific programs. Dean Strange 
nevertheless is reporting College III progress to the Assembly 
regularly. The tenure proposal will be submitted to the Assembly 
and from there to the Trustees for approval after review by Chan- 
cellor-designate Golino. 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Regarding approval of courses, Dr. Hamilton said that the 
Assembly normally approves the courses to be offered the following 
fall; however, the time constraints involved for College III may not 
permit preparation of a list in time for submission this spring. 
President Wood noted that, at the time of the December 28, 1971, vote 
authorizing curricular development, program planning, and minimum 
staffing, the present governance procedure was not in effect. The 
reports being submitted to the Committee are a result of that vote. 

Mr. Lyons affirmed Dean Strange 's statements that the 
Assembly does not have approval power over course credits within 
individual colleges. To allay any concerns of the Trustees or the 
President's Office, he said, the Committee might wish to refer this 
particular report to the Assembly for discussion and comment. 

Ms. Robinson pointed out that the development of this 
report has highlighted an area of ambiguity on the Boston campus; 
there is no mechanism for academic review within a new College, 
although the responsibility is properly within the Provost's Office. 
She suggested that the Chancellor and the Provost may wish to develop 
such a mechanism. Dean Strange said that he has been reporting to 
Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall throughout the planning process. 

After briefly reviewing the tenets regarding College III 
contained in the Jefferson Report, Dean Strange stated that the 
University Assembly Constitution provides for an ad hoc committee to 
develop general plans for a new college which becomes relatively 
autonomous after these plans have been approved by the Assembly. The 
new college then assumes responsibility for its courses and tenure 
review for its faculty. Chairman Troy agreed that the report very 
carefully follows the Jefferson Committee recommendations. Dr. 
Strange mentioned that the Assembly could have exercised its consti- 
tutional authority to request a special review of the program. 
President Wood stated that the Faculty and Educational Policy Commit- 
tee is not responsible for the initial substantive review or program 
content; there must be some kind of validating mechanism on the cam- 
pus. Dean Strange proposed that the delay of a year and a half 
between the adoption of the Jefferson Report and the establishment of 
College III may have caused some problems. Trustee Troy requested 
that the Committee have assurance that any programs generated for 
College III have been reviewed and approved by the UM/Boston Chan- 
cellor and Provost. Acting Chancellor Hamilton concluded that 
College III is today seeking only general support of its status. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that College 
III at the University of Massachusetts /Boston be 
authorized, to continue to develop as a College of 
Public and Community Service, enrolling up to 300 
students for the academic year 1973-74 and hiring 
faculty, administrative, and support personnel as 
required for the program, within guidelines estab- 
lished by the Provost and the Chancellor. 



4095 



F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 

UM/Boston — 
College III 
Curriculum Report 
(DOC. T73-137) 



F & EP Comm. 
3-30-73 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:45 p.m. 



COMMITTEE 




Robert J. MrfCafirt'ney 
Secretary, S^ard of Trustees 




COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 
April 19, 1973; 12:00 noon; Room 1101, Campus Center, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Knowles, President 
Wood; Trustees Crowley, Haigis, Lambson, Sullivan; Trea- 
surer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Ladd 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Ms. 
Robinson, Mr. Kaplan; Mr. Roth, Architectural Consultant 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Planning Officer Little- 
field, Chief Project Engineer Ryan; Mr. Lindsey, Chairman, 
Campus Center Board of Governors 

UM/Boston : Francis O'Brien, Assistant to the Chancellor 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Guests of Chairman Knowles : Students , Paul Peloquin and 
John Read, UM/Amherst 



Chairman Knowles called the meeting to order at 12:50 p.m. 
She formally recognized Trustee Haigis' s service to the University 
and to the Committee as its Chairman from 1963 through 1972. He 
was accorded a rising vote of thanks by all present and responded 
with appreciation. 

Dean Soutter introduced the Discussion of Proposed Parking 
Facilities, UM/Worcester (DOC. T73-149) for the Committee's prelim- 



409? 



inary information. Further careful study will be required before 
actual construction for use by employees, patients, and visitors to 
the Medical School and hospital. The topography of the site and the 
unique access requirements present special problems. 

President Wood concurred in the need for parking facilities 
at the Medical School. He mentioned that the plan has been reviewed 
by Harold Roth, Architectural Consultant, and especially commended 
the appendices to the document and generally reviewed them, as well 
as the contents of the report. The President stressed that, although 
there are similar transportation and pricing policies and institu- 
tional arrangements for all three campuses, the individual facilities 
and their operation will be different. He noted that UM/Amherst, 
through the efforts of Representative Conte, has instituted a two- 
thirds federally supported mass-transportation program of bussing to 
reduce vehicular traffic on that campus. UM/Boston will basically 
be a commuter campus with parking fees to subsidize bus transpor- 
tation. This will be a possibility for UM/Amherst when the federal 



UM/Worcester — 
Discussion of 
Proposed Parking 
Facilities 
(DOC. T73-149) 



98 



B & G Comm. 
4-19-73 

UM/Worces ter — 
Duscussion of 
Proposed Parking 
Facilities 
(DOC. T73-149) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/ Bos ton — 
Columbia Point 
Campus Trans- 
portation 
(DOC. T73-154) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

grant expires . The Medical School parking facilities , which even- 
tually will be self-supporting, can be financed by the Building 
Authority, the BBC, or a private contractor. The various aspects 
of each method must be studied. 

Mr. Roth affirmed the President's statement. He stressed 
that UM/Worcester must have parking facilities suited to a teaching 
hospital and medical school, as provided in its Master Plan. He 
mentioned that the Planning Officer has recently mailed question- 
naires requesting parking data from about 20 teaching hospitals 
around the nation; these returns will be helpful in support of the 
present proposal. 

Dean Soutter, President Wood, and the Committee agreed 
that Trustee Pumphret's involvement in discussions will be important, 
both as Chairman of the Building Authority and of the Committee on 
Finance of the Board. 

The President asked Mr. Roth to submit a written report to 
the Committee on the various components of the undertaking; i.e., 
size, phasing, fee structure, etc., starting with an 800-space park- 
ing garage (Phase I) to be expanded to 1,800 spaces (Phase III) to 
implement the Master Plan. 

Dean Soutter indicated that grading work will be necessary 
immediately to provide parking areas near the buildings already 
occupied. Planning Officer Littlefield remarked that immediate 
establishment of a parking fee schedule would eliminate the problem 
of transition from free to paid parking now being experienced at 
UM/ Amherst. Treasurer Johnson added that it will be difficult to 
keep the parking facilities on a self-liquidating basis during the 
early years of growth at UM/Worcester. He also mentioned possible 
legal restrictions for both the Building Authority and private con- 
tractors in undertaking any parking facility there. 

Turning to Columbia Point Campus Transportation, UM/Boston 
(DOC. T73-154) , President Wood assured the Committee that the early 
predictions of massive traffic disruption were misleading and based 
on preliminary computations, fears of Columbia Point residents, and 
negative comments by critics of the University. In addition to 
participating in a simulated traffic jam planned for next week, the 
Task Force of the University Assembly, UM/Boston, is recommending 
that the opening of Columbia Point be delayed until January 1974 to 
permit the resolution of housing and other problems. Dr. Wood stated 
that his office will consider a delay only for technological reasons 
and is proceeding toward the scheduled September opening. Weekly 
meetings are being held to maintain communication with all segments 
(University, community, and city) involved. The Trustees will be 
asked to consider a policy statement for the Columbia Point campus 
at their June meeting . 



1 



COMMITTEE 



" 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Discussions are in progress with the Department of Trans- 
portation and the MBTA regarding automobile access and bus service 
for the Columbia Point campus. President Wood reviewed the various 
arrangements under consideration including a related fee structure 
to provide sufficient income to subsidize the student transit trip 
and parking. Mr. O'Brien noted that a higher fee will probably be 
set at first and then may be reduced, if feasible. He explained the 
determination of need for ten buses and the variables not yet 
resolved. Discussion followed on the feasibility of use of Univer- 
sity buses by Columbia Point residents, the route to be followed, and 
methods of student identification. Trustee Haigis urged consideration 
of access by boat transportation. He will be informed of j the results 
of a feasibility study on this subject by an interested boat line. 
President Wood requested Mr. Littlefield to provide the Committee 
with an interim report, including cost data, on the DOT bus operation 
at UM/Amherst for consideration at its next meeting. 

Regarding action by the Trustees, Treasurer Johnson 
stated that a formal request should be made to the MBTA for transit 
bus service between Columbia Station and the campus and listed the 
following options: (1) a 20-cent fare each way (in addition to the 
regular subway fare to Columbia Station) , (2) a pass given to each 
student who had paid the regular fare to cover the last lap from 
Columbia Station to the campus, and (3) free bus service from 
Columbia Station to the campus subsidized by fees charged for use of 
the Columbia Point parking garages. Trustee Lambson cautioned on 
possible misuse of a free or low-cost bus access to the campus. 

No action by the Trustees will be requested at this time 
on the Trust- Fund vote included in DOC. T73-154. The Treasurer and 
the University Counsel wish to have full and precise information on 
what use would be made of monies accrued by such a fund. 

Replying to Trustee Ladd, President Wood said that, instead 
of the simulated traffic jam planned for next week, there will pro- 
bably be a teach-in at Boston College High School concerning problems 
of community relations . 

Ms . Robinson gave an overview of the highly complicated 
immediate and peripheral problems related to transportation of stu- 
dents to the Columbia Point campus; i.e., financing, housing, sub- 
sidizing, community relations, etc. Trustee Crowley expressed 
agreement with Trustee Lambson that reasonable transportation charges 
should be assessed. Trustee Ladd reminded the Committee that one of 
the basic purposes of the University is to provide low-cost public 
higher education. He urged that every effort be made to keep com- 
muting expenses minimal. 

It was the sense of the meeting that work proceed on the 
Columbia Point transportation problem "with the utmost urgency." 



4099 



B & G Comm. 
4-19-73 

UM/Boston — 
Columbia Point 
Campus Trans- 
portation 
(DOC. T73-154) 



4100 

B & G Comm. 
4-19-73 



UM/ Amherst — 
Approval of the 
meetes and 
Bounds of Land 
to be Trans- 
fer redcOMMITTEE 

to Town of 

Amherst for 

Purpose of 

Erecting a Fire 

Station 

(DOC. T73-150) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Approval of the 
Working Draw- 
ings and 
Specifications : 
Modular Project 
(DOC. T73-151) 



Planning Officer Littlefield displayed a map of the campus and 
pointed out the area to be conveyed, as approved in principle on 
March 3, 1973. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
agree to convey, subject to appropriate legisla- 
tive action by the General Court, to the Town of 
Amherst for purposes of construction of a fire 
station, a parcel of land consisting of 3.852 
acres of land bounded and described as detailed 
in DOC. T73-150. 

Mr. Littlefield requested Approval of the Working Drawings 
and Specifications: Modular Project, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-151) for 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chairman Knowles then called for the Approval of the Metes 
and Bounds of the Land to Be Transferred to the Town of Amherst for 



the Purpose of Erecting a Fire Station, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-150). 



which schematic plans and color selection were approved on May 10, 
1972. Originally planned for classroom and/or office space at the 
time UM/Amherst was expanding rapidly, these units were also foreseen 
as "swing space" for temporary use while various permanent buildings 
are being renovated. Mr. Littlefield explained the various causes 
for delay in moving ahead on this project, which normally would have 
been completed within a year. These delays have now been resolved 
and, in addition to approval of the working drawings and specifica- 
tions, the Committee was requested to recommend (1) an expression of 
Trustee concern that Site C not be eliminated and (2) a reduction in 
the budget for furnishings, equipment, and partitioning. Mr. Little- 
field estimated that the buildings, though temporary, will be used 
for 15 to 20 years; he also noted that they are relocatable. He 
explained that furniture will be available from surplus and/or from 
buildings being renovated. He also directed the Committee's atten- 
tion to a scale model in the room and pointed out the proposed Sites 
AD, C, and J on the campus map. 

After brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the working drawings and specifications 
for the purchase and installation of modular 
classroom and office components and certain site 
development, foundations, and utilities connec- 
tions at UM/Amherst in accordance with plans and 
specifications on file with the Planning Officer, 
UM/Amherst. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
Planning Officer, UM/Amherst, be authorized to 
convey to the Bureau of Building Construction the 
concern of the Board of Trustees that all reason- 
able action be taken to avoid the elimination of 
Site C, proposed for location of modular buildings. 

It was then 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize a reduction in the furnishings, equip- 
ment, and partitioning budget of the modular 
projects from $350,000 to $200,000, as detailed 
in DOC. T73-151. 

The Committee having toured the Amherst campus with Mr. 
Littlefield immediately previous to this meeting, consideration was 
then given to Acceptance of New Buildings: University Library , 
Graduate Research Center Phase I, Tobin Hall (including Tennis 
Courts), Horticultural Research (Belchertown) , Herter Hall and 
Thompson Hall, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-152) . President Wood informed 
the Committee that The University Library, the Graduate Research 
Center, and the Fine Arts Center have been so named by vote of the 
Board on May 31, 1968, by reference to DOC. T68-081. Mr. Haigis 
urged that extreme care be taken that everything on the punch lists 
be corrected by the contractor. Areas requiring attention included 
the desk at the entrance to the Library; also, some concrete work 
on Tobin Hall. Mr. Ryan assured the Committee that these items will 
be included for attention under the one-year guarantee by BBC. 
Trustee Lambson called attention to damaged chairs he had seen at 
the Graduate Research Center. He opined that the quality was very 
poor. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

accept the following buildings at UM/Amherst sub- 
ject to satisfactory completion or correction by 
the appropriate contractors of a list of items on 
file with the Director of Physical Plant, UM/Amherst: 

1. The University Library 

2. The Graduate Research Center (Phase I) 

3. Tobin Hall (including tennis courts replacement) 

It was also 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
accept as completed in accordance wittuplans and 
specifications on file with the Director of Physical 
Plant at UM/Amherst, the following buildings: 

1. John Chandler Laboratory (Belchertown) 

2. Thompson Hall 

3. Herter Hall 



4101 

B & G Comm. 
4-19-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Approval of the 
Working Drawings 
and Specifica- 
tions : Modular 
Project 
(DOC. T73-151) 

UM/Amherst — 
Acceptance of 
New Buildings 
(DOC. T73-152) 



4102 

B & G Comm. 
4-19-73 

UM/ Amherst — 

Temporary Use 

of Trailer Unit JAmherst (DOC. T73-153) is necessary in order to relocate the Health 

at the Health Center pharmacy temporarily during construction of an addition to the 
building. When the project is completed, the trailers will be 
removed and will be available for other University sites. On motion 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Planning Officer Littlefield explained that the Temporary 
Use of Trailer Units at the Health Center Construction Site, UM/ 



Center Con- 

COMM1TTEE 

struction Site 
(DOC. T73-153) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Sewerage Ban, 
Town of 
Amherst 



made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the temporary use of two trailer units 
at the Health Center Construction Site, as out- 
lined in DOC. T7 3-153. 

For the Committee's information in connection with the pre- 
sent Sewerage Ban in the Town of Amherst , Mr. Littlefield reviewed 
the cooperation of the University in relation to the sewerage system. 
Trustee Sullivan, Chairman of the Amherst Board of Selectmen, explained 
that the problem is very serious in the Amherst College area. He 
cited as of most concern to the University the overflowing of the 
treatment plant, adding that students and residents will be requested 
to limit the use of showers. The ban will be lifted in phases as the 
situation is improved; however, the new treatment plant will not be 
available until 1976. 



Chairman Knowles noted problems with the air conditioning 
in the Campus Center. She suggested that future building plans make 
provision for windows which open. Mr. Ryan said that this is bud- 
geted for the accommodations area of the Campus Center. 

Chancellor Bromery expressed appreciation that Chairman 
Knowles had visited and toured the campus during the past two days. 
Trustee Haigis assured her of his pleasure at her assuming the chair- 
manship of the Committee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 




Robert J. 
Secretary, 




'artney 
> r oard of Trustees 



[ 



COMMITTEE 



W 



4103 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
April 23, 1973; 10:00 a.m.; Office of President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret, President 
Wood; Trustees Crowley, Ladd, Robertson, Rowland; Trea- 
surer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Kelly 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg, University Counsel Searson 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellors Campion 
and Gluckstern, Budget Director Gulko, Mr. Lambert; Prof. 
Paul Schuldiner, Chairman of the Transportation and Park- 
ing Council; Mr. Michael Gregory, Student Senate Rents and 
Fees Committee 

UM/Boston : Mr. Joe Condrick and Ms. Carol Barnstead, 
Mass. Public Interest Research Group 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter, Dr. Stockwell, Mr. Cathy 

Standish, Ayer, and Wood, Inc . : Mr . Wood 



Chairman Pumphret convened the meeting at 10:10 a.m. and 
called upon Mr. Wood from Investment Counsel to make his report. 
Mr. Wood explained to the Committee that the report (DOC. T73-168) 
includes only an appraisal of the University's portfolio because 
the company is in the process of completing its six-month report. 

The report also includes a letter from Mr. Wood to the 
Treasurer recommending the sale of the University's shares in 
Magnavox Company and the purchase of an additional 100 shares of 
Smith, Kline, and French. Mr. Wood briefly outlined the reasons for 
this recommendation. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To authorize the Treasurer of the University, 
Kenneth W. Johnson, to execute changes in the 
University's investment portfolio as recom- 
mended by Standish, Ayer, and Wood, Inc., as 
follows: 

Sell: 400 shares, Magnavox 

Buy: 100 shares, Smith, Kline, and French 



Report of 

Investment 

Counsel 

(DOC. T73-168) 



4104 

Finance Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Boston — 
Public Interest 
Research Group 
Proposal 
(DOC. T73-157) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester — 
Fund Transfers 
(DOC. T73-159, 
revised) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Chairman then turned to the Public Interest Research 
Group Proposal (Mass PIRG East), UM/Boston (DOC. T73-157) He stated 
that, since 54% of the students at the Boston campus supported the 
collection of a $2.00 fee for Mass PIRG East, he had no objection. 
He queried what the cost is to the University for collecting these 
fees. Mr. Joe Condrick, representing the Boston PIRG, explained 
that he would find out what the cost had been for the Amherst campus 
and the projected cost for the Boston campus. 

Trustee Rowland noted that the WMPIRG proposal from the 
Amherst campus had come before the Student Activities Committee last 
year. Her Committee had endorsed the concept of a public interest 
research group. She felt that there was no need to do so again. 
She said she endorsed the proposal for the Boston campus that was 
before the Committee today. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees the levying 
of a Mass PIRG East student fee of $2.00 per 
semester on each student's term bill at UM/Boston, 
payment of which shall be made on a voluntary 
but nonrefundable basis, in accordance with the 
Eastern Massachusetts Public Interest Research 
Group Proposal (DOC. T73-157) . 

The Committee considered next the proposed Fund Transfers , 
UM/Worcester (DOC. T73-159, revised). Associate Dean Stockwell 
pointed out that the original support material received by the Com- 
mittee (DOC. T73-159) has been revised in lieu of additional delays 
at the Medical School in the availability of both new buildings and 
approval of adequate salaries to employ qualified power plant engi- 
neers. He explained that the proposed fund transfers, if approved, 
would carry the campus through for the remainder of the fiscal year. 
Mr. Stockwell said that these fund transfers assume the approval of 
the deficiency budget. He then detailed for the Committee changes 
made in the original document for which Trustee approval is now 
requested. 



years. 



Mr. Stockwell pointed out that, for the first time in eight 
the campus is not assuming any carry-over requests. 



President Wood observed that, in response to a question 
raised regarding student housing, Dean Soutter has written a letter 
(distributed to the Committee) which described the situation. 
Chairman Pumphret pointed out that this issue was not before the 
Committee today. Dr. Wood said that the question of housing at the 
Worcester campus would be scheduled for discussion at a future 
Buildings and Grounds Committee meeting. 

It was also noted that these fund transfers have been 
approved by the Administration. After further discussion, it was 
moved, seconded, and 



COMMITTEE 



VOTED: 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
fund transfers between subsidiary accounts recom- 
mended in Document T73-159, revised, as detailed 
below all be approved: 



For UM/Worcester : 



From Accounts 


01 
10 




To Accounts 


02 


$ 49,000 




03 


106,000 




06 


4,000 




11 


7,000 




12 


35,000 




13 


100,000 




14 


24,000 




15 


146,000 
$471,000 



$458,000 

13,000 

$471.000 



4105 

Finance Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Worcester — 
Fund Transfers 
(DOC. T73-159, 
revised) 



Chairman Pumphret presented the next item, Discussion of 
University's Position on Honeywell Investment (DOC. T73-155). The 
question before the Committee was that of support for the proxy 
stockholders statement regarding Honeywell's production of anti- 
personnel weapons. He noted that the University holds 300 shares in 
Honeywell. Included in the support material distributed was a copy 
of a report prepared by the Investor Responsibility Research Center, 
Inc. (IRRC) entitled Antipersonnel Weapons: Honeywell Co . , which 
explained both positions on the issue. 

Trustee Ladd said that the IRRC report was very informa- 
tive and provided a good analysis of the issues. He questioned 
whether this investment complies with the Guidelines for Investment 
previously adopted by the Board. He also questioned Honeywell's com- 
pliance with National and International Laws. Mr. Ladd felt that, 
if what Honeywell is producing violates these laws, then the Univer- 
sity should send a message of its concern (proxy votes) . There is 
also a question whether a corporation has the right or responsibility 
to deny Federal contracts. Mr. Ladd pointed out that the Nuremberg 
trials established clearly that violations of international law 
take precedence over the demands of national government. 

Trustee Robertson queried whether it is the Finance Com- 
mittee's responsibility to interpret the rules of armed conflict or 
international law. The Chairman felt that the Committee shduld 
address itself to the proxy statement presented by a concerned 
group (Mt. Toby Friends). He then read the proxy vote to the Com- 
mittee (included in DOC. T73-155). 

Chairman Pumphret expressed concern with the proxy state- 
ment's view of opposing a corporation's support of the government. 



Discussion of 
University's 
Position on 
Honeywell 
Investment 
(DOC. T73-155) 



4106 

Finance Comm. 
4-23-73 



Discussion- of 
University's 
Position en 
Honeywell 
Investment 

COMMITTEE 

(DOC. T73-155) 



UM/Amherst — 
Auxiliary 
Enterprises and 
Fee-Based Budget 
(DOC. T73-158) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood also questioned whether it was the responsi- 
bility of a University committee to make this kind of decision. He 
pointed out that, if indeed Honeywell is producing antipersonnel 
weapons, there is a genuine issue as to whether it is the application 
of rather than the character of the weapon that leads to unnecessary 
suffering. 

The Chairman called upon Mr. Wood of Standish, Ayer, and 
Wood Investment Counsel to comment. Mr. Wood felt that the IRRC 
report was a good one; also, that the questions raised by Trustee 
Ladd were difficult. 

Mr. Ladd reminded the Committee that the purpose of adopt- 
ing the Guidelines for Investment was to look at corporations to see 
if they are violating the environment, public health, etc. 

Chairman Pumphret pointed out that Honeywell's position is 
that they are no longer producing antipersonnel weapons. He again 
expressed his disagreement with the position in the Stockholder 's 
Statement and said that he felt the University should not support it, 



Treasurer Johnson explained that, in practice, we do not 
usually send our proxy votes. 

Following further discussion, Trustee Ladd moved that the 
Committee support the position in the stockholder proposal. This 
motion was defeated. Trustee Ladd is recorded as being in favor of 
the stockholder proposal. 

The Chairman moved next to the UM/Amherst Auxiliary Enter- 
prises and Fee-based Budgets (DOC. T73-158) . Budget Director Gulko 



explained to the Committee that Document T73-158 summarizes the 
various proposed major auxiliary enterprises and fee-based trust fund 
budgets for the Amherst campus. He said that these fees and the 
associated budgets have gone through extensive review on campus by 
the appropriate student and staff committees. Vice Chancellor 
Campion said that they have also been reviewed and approved by the 
Chancellor and the Principal Administrative Officers at UM/Amherst. 

Chairman Pumphret then requested the Committee to consider 
the items separately. General discussion followed on the proposed 
votes as set forth in DOC. T73-158. It was observed that, in general 
the overall increase in the cost of living during the past year has 
contributed to the slight increase in some of the fees- 
After extensive review, the following votes were moved, 
seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

effective September 1, 1973, the following be 
adopted as the schedule of charges for served 
meals in Worcester Dining Commons: 



1 



COMMITTEE 



I 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Plan 
10 meals per week 
15 meals per week 

It was then 



Annual Charge 
$569.50 
643.50 



Per Semester 

Charge 

$284.75 

321.75 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if 

adopted by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, the following charges be effective 
September 1, 1973, for meals served in dining 
facilities included in the Third, Fifth, Seventh, 
and Ninth Projects of the Authority. 



Plan 
10 meals per week 
15 meals per week 

It was further 



Annual Charge 
$569.50 
643.50 



Per Semester 

Charge 

$284.75 

321.75 



VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize the loan of sufficient funds to the Board- 
ing Hall Trust Fund from the Student Housing 
Deposit Account (#06-038630) at 4.5% interest, 
compounded monthly, to liquidate accounts payable 
as of June 30, 1973, subject to repayment on or 
before October 1, 1973. 

It was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if 

adopted by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, the following per-bed charges, 
reflecting either a $35 or $40 increase in all 
Projects except the Twelfth, for student accom- 
modations in dormitories of the Authority be 
approved effective September 1, 1973: 



Project 


Annual 


Per Semester 


Dormitories 


Charge 
$615.00 


Charge 


First Project 


$307.50 


Second Project 


675.00 


337.50 


Twelfth Project 


700.00 


350.00 


All Other 


680.00 


340.00 


Projects 







Daily Charge 
for Less that 
One Semester 



$2.85 
3.10 
3.25 
3.15 



It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
September 1, 1973, the following be established as 
charges for student accommodations in dormitories in 
the Residence Halls Trust Fund. Such charges reflect 
an annual $35.00 across-the-board increase over the 
previous rates : 



4107 

Finance Comm. 
4-23-73 



UM/ Amherst — 
Auxiliary 
Enterprises and 
Fee-based Budget 
(DOC. T73-158) 



4 1 08 

Finance Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Auxiliary 
Enterprises and 
Fee-based Budget 
(DOC. T73-158) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Condition 


Annual 
Charge 

$615.00 
675.00 


Per Semester 
Charge 


Daily Charge 
for Less than 
One Semester 


Unrenovated 
Renovated 


$307.50 
337.50 


$2.85 
3.10 


It was then 








VOTED: To recomn 


lend to the 


Board of Trustees that, 



effective September 1, 1973, the conference 
rates in the Residence Halls Trust Fund dormi- 
tories shall be as shown below: 



Accommodation 
Single room, all services 
Double room, all services 
Single room, no services 
Double room, no services 



New Rates* 
$9.00/night 
6.50/night/bed 
2.75/night 
2.75/night/bed 



Present Rates 
$9.00/night 
5.00/night/bed 
2.50/night 
2.50/night/bed 



*0ccupants staying in excess of seven days shall be given 
a 10% discount. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if 

adopted by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, the following charges for conference 
accommodations in all dormitories of the Authority , 
effective September 1, 1973, shall be as shown below: 



Accommodation 
Single room, all services 
Double room, all services 
Single room, no services 
Double room, no services 



New Rates* 
$9. 00 /night 
6.50/night/bed 
2.75/night 
2.75/night/bed 



Present Rates 
$9.00/night 
5.00/night/bed 
2.50/night 
2.50/night/bed 



*0ccupants staying in excess of seven days shall be given 
a 10% discount. 

It was then 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
September 1, 1973, the following be established as 
the per-student fee to be charged for room telephone 
service in dormitories now serviced by the Amherst 
dormitory centrix telephone system: $20.00 per 
semester; or $1.25 per week for periods less than 
one semester. 

It was further 



] 



COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if 
adopted by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, the following per-month charges, 
which reflect a monthly $15.00 across-the-board 
increase for apartment accommodations in the 
Authority's Project 13: North Village be approved, 
effective September 1, 1973: 



Apartment Type 



Monthly Charge 







One 


Bedroom 




$165 


00 






Two 


Bedrooms 




180 


00 


It 


was 


then 










VOTED: 


To 


recommenc 


[ to the Board 


of 


Trustees 


that, 



effective September 1, 1973, the following 
annual student fee of $59.50, which includes 
$7.50 for the Student Activities allocation, 
be established for the Campus Center/Student 
Union Complex. Be it further voted that the 
fee will be adjusted to $52.00 in the event 
that funding of Student Activities be trans- 
ferred to the Student Activities Trust Fund. 
In either event the budget remains in balance. 

It was further 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, 

effective July 1, 1973, the following maximum 
fee schedule for accommodations services at the 
Campus Center/Student Union Complex be established: 

Accommodation Charge 

Twin Bedrooms 
Single Occupancy 
Double Occupancy 

Two-room Suites 

Single Occupancy 

Double Occupancy 
Children's rollaway cot 
Rates for six days or more 



$15.00 
20.00 



28.00 
33.00 

3.00 

90% of above 



The prior action of the Board of Trustees at its meeting 
of October 4, 1972, granting the Chancellor, UM/Amherst, 
authority to deviate from existing rates for Campus 
Center for groups of 10 or more persons is also reaffirmed 
as follows : 



4109 

Finance 

Comm. 

4-23-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Auxiliary 
Enterprises 
and Fee- 
based Budget 
(DOC. T73-158 



41101 

Finance 

Comm. 

4-23-73 

UM/Amherst- 
Auxiliary 
Enter- 
prises and 
Fee-based 

COMMITTEE 

Budget 
DOC. T73-158 



UM/Amherst- 
Proposed 
Parking Fees 
DOC. T73-158 



VOTED : 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

a. Minimum rates of $12.00 for double occupancy may 
be offered during periods of the year when low 
occupancy is expected. 

b. Minimum rates for single occupancy of $10.00 per 
room may be offered under the same circumstances. 

Deviation from established rates will, in each case, be 
subject to approval by the Chancellor. 

It was then 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve a recommendation of the Board of Directors 
of the Top of the Campus, Inc., to reduce the 
General Membership fee for nonstudent members of 
the corporation from five dollars ($5.00) to one 
dollar ($1.00). 

It was further 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, if 
adopted by the University of Massachusetts Build- 
ing Authority, the following charges for parking 
space in Project #11 (Campus Center Garage) be 
approved, effective July 1, 1973: 



Hourly Rate: 

Coupon Book: 
Hotel Guest Parking: 
Monthly Parking 
Multi-month Parking : 



$.25/hour — $1.00 maximum for 12 his, 
$2.00 maximum for 24 hfs, 
$15.00/30 tickets 
$1 . 50/overnight/car 
$9.95/car 
June 1 to August 31 $20.00/car 
July 1 to August 31 15.00/ca:: 
Dec. 1 to Jan 31 15.00/ca:: 



[ 



I 



Chairman Pumphret turned to the final fee item submitted 
by the Amherst campus: Proposed Parking Fees . Vice Chancellor 
Campion summarized briefly the background of the present proposal, 
explaining that this issue has been the subject of discussion at 
various levels since 1967. 

In January 1971, Chancellor Bromery requested Professor 
Paul Shuldiner, Civil Engineering, to head an ad hoc committee to 
assemble views expressed in each of the previous reports. In 
general, these have all identified the idea of graduated parking 
fees and the concept of service-based fees. 

Dr. Shuldiner' s ad hoc committee report recommended the 
establishment of a Transportation and Parking Council. This is now 
in existence. It consists of representatives from the faculty, 
staff, and student body. The proposal now before the Finance Com- 
mittee is basically what was recommended by the Transportation and 



I 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Parking Council. These recommendations include a graduated parking 
fee, based on service (i.e., the farther out from the center of cam- 
pus, the less the fee). 

Mr. Campion commended Dr. Shuldiner and the Council for 
their fine work. He reminded the Committee that, for those parking 
farther away from the center of campus, bus service has been estab- 
lished (with the aid of a DOT Grant) . This service will continue to 
be provided as an aid to the mobility of persons on campus . 

Mr. William Lambert was then introduced to provide further 
information. With the aid of charts, he explained both the compara- 
tive data collected from other universities and the location of 
various parking lots, together with their fees; also, the rationale 
for the selection of these lots. 

General discussion followed. It was noted that the pro- 
posed fee schedule makes no distinction among faculty, students and 
staff. 

Chairman Pumphret noted that this Committee has been 
anticipating a parking report for a number of years. He also 
observed that one of the earlier motivations for getting involved 
was concern for protection of cars. He stressed the importance of 
obtaining additional information relating to the parking policies, 
fee structures (if any), etc., from a more broadly representative 
group of Massachusetts colleges and universities, including private 
institutions. 

Dr. Shuldiner explained that the Parking Council, of 
which he is chairman, suggested the development of car pools along 
with the improved bus service. He called for a commitment to pro- 
vide safe, adequate parking for all persons on the UM/Amherst campus. 

Vice Chancellor Campion agreed that students' incomes are 
generally lower, but still felt the proposed parking system and fees 
would be the best solution to the parking problem at this time. 

In response to a question from Trustee Ladd, it was 
explained that the basic fee of $5.00 is a campus-wide fee. The 
Transportation and Parking Council, made up of representatives of all 
campus constituencies, has made the proposed recommendations. Mr. 
Campion added that this proposal has gone before the various Senates 
arid-^has been endorsed by the UM/Amherst Administration. 

It was pointed out that the Massachusetts State Employees 
Association maintains that campus parking fees are a negotiable item 
under their various contracts. Chairman Pumphret said he would be 
willing to hear their point of view if they have a case. 

The parking meters recently installed were reported to be 
relatively successful. Staff and students now have an opportunity 
to park closer to the center of the campus . 



4111 

Finance Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Amherst — 

Proposed Parking 

Fees 

(DOC. T73-158) 



4112 

Finance. Soma. 
4-23-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Proposed 
Parking Fees 
(DOC. T73-158) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees (1) that a 
schedule of parking registration and usage fees, 
to go into effect September 1, 1973, be established 
as follows: 

(a) a basic registration fee of $5.00 to be paid 
by all users of on-campus surface parking . 

(b) a graduated schedule of additional charges, from 
$19.00 to $70.00 for assignment to preferred 
surface parking locations on campus, in accordance 
with the schedule shown in Document T73-158. 

(c) an additional annual charge beyond those 
specified above of $12.00 for overnight parking 
in designated secured areas. 

(d) a charge of $125.00 (including the $5.00 
registration fee) for a reserved space in any 
lot. 

(2) That authorization be granted for the installation 
of an additional 300 parking meters, in locations 
determined by the Transportation and Parking Office. 

(3) That the Chancellor of the Amherst campus is hereby 
delegated authority to revise the assignment of 
parking charges to individual parking locations 
within the approved schedule of graduated charges. 

Trustee Ladd is recorded in opposition. 

The meeting was adjourned at 12:05 p.m. 




Robert J. Mc 
Secretary, 





ney 
of Trustees 



I 



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1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
April 23, 1973; 12 noon; Office of the President, One Washington Mall 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Troy, President Wood; 
Trustees Boy den, Kelly, Ladd, Robertson; Mr. Callahan for 
Commissioner Anrig, Education; Mr. Rosenthal for Commissioner 
Greenblatt, Mental Health; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Father 
Walsh, University Counsel Searson, Ms. Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Gluckstern 
Prof. Burke, rep. Faculty Senate; Dean Jeremiah Allen, Arts 
and Sciences; Dean Kenneth Picha, Engineering; Prof. Buck, 
Chairman, Academic Matters- Committee, Faculty Senate; 
Associate Provost Robert Woodbury; Donald C. Freeman, 
Associate Dean of Humanities; Prof. David Knauf , Chairman, 
Dept. of Theatre; Prof. J. E. Sunderland, Head, Mechanical 
and Aero Engineering; Assoc. Prof. William E. Connolly, 
Dept. of Political Science; Asst. Prof. Peter D'Errico, 
Legal Studies; Capt. John W. Libby, Asst. Prof. Military 
Science; also the following students: Timothy Brown, 
Stephen P. Schultz, Charles Hogins, Sherman Lajmer, Wayne 
Gallant, and Gordon Polanski 

UM/Boston : Acting Vice Chancellor Marshall; Prof. Lyons, 
rep. faculty 

UM/Worcester: Dean Soutter 



Chairman Troy called the meeting to order at 12:30 p.m. 
The order of the agenda was changed to take up first the ROTC Credit 
item (DOC. T73-124B) . 

Chancellor Bromery reviewed the history of this issue. In 
1969 the UM/Amherst Faculty Senate had recommended that credit be 
removed from courses taught by ROTC personnel. This was reaffirmed 
in April 1972 and sustained by a vote of the Board of Trustees at its 
meeting of May 10, 1972. The Senate's Academic Matters Committee 
then gave the issue further intensive study. Earlier this year, it 
recommended that the University restore credit for ROTC courses; 
also, that these courses be handled in the same manner as all other 
academic courses. At its meeting of March 30, 1973, the Trustee 
Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy requested further docu- 
mentation on ROTC course contents; also, information on the effect of 
alternate decisions on cadets already in the program. 



4113 



UM/Amherst — 
ROTC Credit 
(DOC. T73-124B) 



4114 

F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
ROTC Credit 
(DOC. T73-124B) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery introduced for further comment Professor 
Buck, Chairman of the Senate Academic Matters Committee. Dr. Buck 
said that the recommendation by Academic Matters was based on informa 
tion provided by its Subcommittee on Military Affairs. It was noted 
that many changes have taken place in ROTC in the way faculty members 
are appointed; also, in approval of courses. A so-called military 
najor, he said, grants 8 to 12 credits over a four-year period. 

Chairman Troy queried what percentage of the 8 to 12 credits 
were taught by the academic departments in contrast to those taught 
by the military. Captain John Libby, Assistant Professor of Military 
Science, responded that 100 percent are "team taught." He added that 
if credit is restored, an effort will be made to have military 
science courses taught jointly by ROTC personnel and academic depart- 
ments . 

Vice President Edelman queried whether proper interpreta- 
tion of the vote taken by the Trustees last May might not permit the 
granting of credit for team-taught courses, or for military courses 
taught exclusively by academic departments , thus obviating any need 
for change or rescission of the standing Trustee vote in this matter. 
He offered to research the Administration's response to inquiries 
seeking interpretation of this point. 

Chancellor Bromery stressed that current requests for 
Trustee action to rescind the previous vote are important because 
rescission will place the matter back on the campus where he feels 
it belongs. Trustee Boyden supported this position. He pointed out 
that last year's Trustee vote merely accepted the action taken pre- 
viously by the Faculty Senate. President Wood added that it is 
important to delineate where the primary responsibility for action 
in this matter lies . 

Trustee Robertson queried whether, if restored, academic 
credit will be retroactive for those students who took courses with- 
out credit last fall. The answer was affirmative. 

Chairman Troy next called for statements from campus repre- 
sentatives on both sides of the ROTC question. Prof. William Con- 
nolly, Political Science Department, felt that the Academic Matters 
Committee report had not taken into account the arguments which had 
persuaded the Senate to remove ROTC credit in the first place. These 
were: (1) the appointment of ROTC credit faculty is initiated from 
outside the University; (2) the instructors are paid from outside 
sources, leading to possible conflicts of interest; (3) the long- 
term accountability of military personnel is to their military 
career, thus impeding their freedom to speak out — a condition not 
prevailing in the regular faculty. Prof. Connolly added that a 
number of faculty senators feel that all the advantages of ROTC can 
be maintained without offering academic credit. 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response, it was indicated that there was a precedence 
for appointments such as those made in ROTC. For example, in wild- 
life management, certain federal agencies make adjunct appointments 
and provide the salaries for such positions. 

Captain Libby responded for the military science area. He 
pointed out that he was at the University of Massachusetts because 
he had requested the assignment as had all the other ROTC officers. 
"They are all volunteers," he added, "and have met the University's 
academic criteria." 

Captain Libby added that "the University has far greater 
leverage in eliminating me than it does other faculty members." He 
felt that the issue of hiring or firing of ROTC faculty has no 
relevance in the issue. With regard to academic content of courses, 
he "stands on what he teaches at the University." He "finds it inter 
esting" that credit is denied for courses he teaches in his own 
department, whereas he has taught an outside honors colloquium for one 
credit, and has taught for credit in Project 10. Responding to 
Trustee Kelly, he noted that 12 persons from outside of ROTC have 
taken a course in military history (presently noncredit) , some of 
whom in the past (and for credit) have been from Smith, Amherst, and 
Mt. Holyoke Colleges. 

Tim Brown, an ROTC major, "works very hard" in his military 
courses. He felt that, although some benefit may be derived from 
taking such courses without credit, credit is certainly an advantage 
and should be restored. "Moral disagreement with some of the course 
content by certain individuals should not be a motive for removal of 
credit," he concluded. 

President Wood reported that Vice President Edelman had 
researched the records and discovered two points : (1) a letter sent 
from the President to Speaker Barkley in which he indicated that team 
teaching credit was available and (2) the vote taken by the Trustees 
on May 10 was sufficiently ambiguous to be construed to apply to 
team-teaching or nonteam- teaching. Under these circumstances, the 
President felt that the proposal of Chancellor Bromery to rescind the 
previous Trustee vote would be appropriate. 

Trustee Ladd, noting that he will vote against the motion 
to rescind, observed that the two Senates at UM/Amherst are not now 
in agreement on this issue. He believes that the Faculty Senate did 
not deal appropriately with the issue originally raised in 1969 and 
1970 regarding the importance of the initiation of appointment, the 
limitations on academic freedom, and the inability to gain tenure of 
military personnel who teach ROTC courses. 

Trustee Robertson stressed that heterogeneity is a principa 
goal of the University and that limitations imposed selectively on 
military science represent, in effect, an infringement of academic 
freedom. He added that students are not required to take ROTC, but 
that it is available on a voluntary basis. 



4115 



F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Amherst — 
ROTC Credit 
(DOC. T73-124B) 



4116 

F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 



UM/ Amherst — 
ROTC Credit 
(DOC. T73-124B) 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Legal Studies 
Program 
(DOC. T73-160) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Chancellor Bromery stressed again his main concern that 
this matter be returned to the UM/ Amherst campus. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that its 

vote of May 10, 1972, accepting the action of the 
Faculty Senate, UM/Amherst, terminating academic 
credit for courses taught by the Division of 
Military and Air Science be rescinded; also, that 
credit be awarded retroactively for students suc- 
cessfully completing courses in the Division of 
Military and Air Science during the fall semester, 
1972-73 academic year. 

At the invitation of Trustee Troy, Chairman Buck of the 
UM/Amherst Faculty Senate Academic Matters Committee, presented the 
item, Legal Studies Program (DOC. T73-160). 

This proposal calls for Trustee approval of (1) an inter- 
disciplinary undergraduate major in legal studies; (2) a Program in 
Legal Studies , involving seven faculty members from the School of 
Business Administration. 

Discussion followed. It was emphasized that the proposed 
program should not in any sense be confused with a pre-prof essional 
or professional education program in law. It is the study of law 
as a discipline. Currently, there are approximately 1,000 pre-law 
students at UM/Amherst. The proposed Legal Studies Program is not 
designed for them. It is intended for a group of less than 100 
students. 

Responding to a query from President Wood, Prof. Buck 
added that such a program could become a part of a Law Center if one 
were developed in the future. It can, however, thrive separately. 
Appropriate disclaimers and careful counseling will serve to guide 
pre-law students away from offerings in the Legal Studies Program. 

In response to Chairman Troy, Prof. Buck indicated that 
disciplines involved will include political science, history, 
economics, School of Business, sociology, and labor relations. Five-- 
College involvement is also anticipated. The career opportunities 
include public service, law enforcement, and various government 
agencies . 

Upon motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 

establishment of a 24-credit-hour interdisciplinary 
undergraduate major in legal studies, together with 
identification of a Program in Legal Studies, be 
approved, as detailed in DOC. T73-160. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern introduced Dr. Knauf, Chairman, 
Dept. of Theatre, who outlined the item, Lease of Provincetown Play- 
house for Department of Theatre, UM/Amherst, Summer of 1973 (DOC. T73 



161) 

Dr. Knauf described this as an effort to stabilize the 
theatre program and gain the benefits of the conservatory and a 
philosophical approach to the performing arts which could not be 
financed on the UM/Amherst campus except at far greater expense. The 
proposal is aimed at gaining professional visibility and providing an 
internship experience for graduate students. 

Dean Jeremiah Allen, Arts and Sciences, added that the 
location at Provincetown where the playhouse is a landmark in the 
listory of American theater is very important; also, the location 
irould afford a type of audience not available in Amherst. 

Chairman Troy clarified that the first-year program would 
involve University graduate students exclusively; the second year 
tfould find a 50:50 link established with a professional company, 
since the project is experimental, it was felt that a one-year lease 
rould make a better arrangement than any form of long-term commitment 
Responding to query from Trustee Boyden, Dr. Knauf specified that the 
summer experience would come under the Teaching Assistant program. 
k stipend of $500 would be paid to each student. Dean Allen said 
that a precedent exists in the Shakespeare Festival conducted 
annually by the University of Colorado. 

The rental fee under terms of the lease amounts to $11,500. 
This amount is expected to be offset by income from the sale of 
tickets calculated on the basis of approximately 100 persons per 
performance, with revenue of $11,400 anticipated for the season. 

Trustee Boyden asked for further clarification of the 
Jniversity's financial commitment. Dean Allen responded that the 
Intention is to deploy some of the resources for the summer program 
Ln theater to the Provincetown project. Mr. Boyden queried further 
an the nature of the audience there. He suggested that the Province- 
:own "image" has deteriorated within the past few years; he sees no 
Immediate likelihood that this situation will improve. He questioned 
whether this image should invite University participation. 

Chancellor Bromery noted that the only reason the matter 
was brought to the Trustees was because of the lease, which requires 
Trustee approval prior to execution. 

Treasurer Johnson urged caution in the mixture of State 
md Trust Funds. He also mentioned that the proposed lease is based 
m a negotiated figure, whereas normally such leases are concluded by 
iward to the low bidder. 

President Wood supported the Treasurer's inquiry, recogniz- 
ing that an opportunity to obtain such property at a favorable figure 
Ls rare, and urged that the Trustees take favorable action. 



4117 



^. 



F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Lease of 
Provincetown 
Playhouse for 
Dept. of 
Theatre, 
Summer 1973 
(DOC. T73-161) 



4118 

F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Lease of 
Provincetown 
Playhouse for 
Dept. of 



COMMITTEE 



Theatre, 
Summer 1973 
(DOC. T73-161) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 
(DOC. T73-143A, 
Supplement) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Trustee Robertson ascertained that the program would be 
approved at this time for one year only. He requested that the 
Theatre Department provide a full report of this activity, including 
the financial outcome, at the end of the season. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve a lease of the Provincetown Playhouse for 
the Department of Theatre, UM/Amherst, in the 
amount of $11,500 for the summer, 1973. 

The Chairman next considered the item, Tenure Recommenda- 
tions, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-143A, Supplement). Vice Chancellor 



Gluckstern reported that 11 positive recommendations were being made 
in Engineering, one in the College of Food and Natural Resources, 
and one in the Faculty of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Further 
recommendations will be made at the Trustee meeting in June. 

Dr. Gluckstern described the personnel committees within 
departments. These are sparse in Engineering due to votes of the 
Faculty, as provided for by Trustee Document T70-062A, indicating 
that the Faculty has high confidence in the School's administration. 
Further involvement of the Engineering faculty in the tenure decision^ 
being presented today has been solicited; nonetheless, the School of 
Engineering will be encouraged to continue to involve departmental 
personnel committees in tenure decisions. 

Dean Picha said the School of Engineering had 62 percent 
tenured faculty prior to the present recommendations (which will 
raise the level to 73 percent). A relatively high percentage of 
tenured faculty in the Engineering area is common. He added that 
faculty are "in and out" of the School (to industry) at all times; 
also, the School has a substantial number of visiting professors. 
Further, many students enter from industry and/or government agencies 
The 11 cases presented today are out of a possible 36 faculty members 
eligible. Ten others of the 36 have been asked to leave. 

Trustee Boyden queried whether the high tenure percentage 
in Engineering was a temporary or a long-range phenomenon. Dean 
Picha responded that most departments would peak out in a year or so, 
and then drop again. Retirements will occur. Also, the 60 faculty 
members he inherited six-and-one-half years ago have now risen to 
110. 

President Wood affirmed the "turn about" character of 
School of Engineering growth before and after Dean Picha 's arrival, 
adding that the field of engineering had come temporarily upon hard 
times which could affect faculty mobility. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the list of tenure recommendations, UM/ 
Amherst, as detailed in DOC. T73-143A, Supplement 
No. 1. 

Chairman Troy called for consideration of the item, Tenure 
Recommendations, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-163). 



President Wood described the process whereby favorable 
:enure recommendations, after clearance from the department through 
:he campus administration and his office, are forwarded in summary 
sheets for Trustee approval. Detailed files are always available for 
Trustee inspection and review. The President considers his own 
Involvement as "procedural," except in unusually difficult cases. Dr 
•food emphasized also that the basic decisions in tenure matters are 
learly of a peer nature at department level. 

The President stressed that the tenure area has become 
Increasingly subject to litigation within the past two or three years, 
k body of law is growing up around it. Under federal law, in certain 
:ases, denial of tenure must be accompanied by written reasons; also, 
rtien an individual feels that damaging material is in his administra- 
tive file and may affect his future chances for employment, he may 
lave access to such files. Thus, the denial of tenure becomes as 
Lmportant a matter as granting of it. Trustees may become litigants 
In contested cases. For this reason among many others, the regulariz- 
ing of tenure procedures and notification is vitally important. 

Acting Vice Chancellor and Provost Marshall presented the 
tenure recommendations for UM/Boston. She cited the careful review 
process employed, some of the difficulties encountered, and the list 
Df persons recommended which is detailed in DOC. T73-163 . 

In the case of Dr. Matteo, Biology, College II, Dr. Marshal: 
reversed the departmental decision. She noted that the biology 
departments in Colleges I and II combine in voting tenure matters, 
and had overwhelmingly recommended Dr. Matteo. Subsequently, the 
College II biology faculty voted against tenure, and she overruled 
this decision. She mentioned the case of A. Newman, instructor in 
Russian, who does not at present hold a Ph.D. degree. Dr. Marshall 
also overruled a department chairman's negative decision in the case 
of N. Shah in the Department of Physics. 

Dr. Marshall discussed problems related to negative tenure 
decisions. One such case has been forwarded to the UM/Boston Tenure 
and Grievance Committee. Dr. Wood made it clear that he would meet 
with grievants in tenure cases only after all campus appeal procedures 
lad been exhausted; only in cases where some fruitful outcome might 
De anticipated, and only on an informal basis so that no doubt could 
exist that all such meetings were not part of any formal appeal pro- 
cedures . 



4119 



F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 
(DOC. T73-143A, 
Supplement) 



UM/Boston — 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 
(DOC. T73-163) 



4120 

F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Bos ton- 
Tenure Recom- 
mendations 
(DOC. T73-163) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Worcester — 
Use of Title of 
Assistant 
(DOC. T73-162) 



UM/Worces ter — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ment in Depart- 
ment of 
Biochemistry 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In response to query from Trustee Boyden, Dr. Marshall 
indicated that the overall tenure picture at UM/Boston would fall in 
the range of 35 percent providing all present recommendations were 
approved. Father Walsh commended Dr. Marshall for "making the hard 
decisions" in an exemplary manner. 

Trustee Kelly inquired about the alleged transfer of some 
new faculty positions from UM/Boston to UM/Amherst. President Wood 
explained that 66 new positions were authorized on the basis of 
enrollment projections by the Secretary of Education which reflected 
an enrollment rise at UM/Boston and a decline at UM/Amherst. Two 
issues were involved: (1) the capacity of the Boston campus to 
absorb that number at a time when the Columbia Point move was under- 
way and after an examination of the admissions capacity last June 
had indicated that some relief from the original June projections was 
needed; (2) the issue of whether the Secretary of Education may 
properly allocate enrollments among the campuses. The President feel 
that the Secretary may project overall enrollment, but that internal 
allocations are a matter for decision by the Board of Trustees. So, 
the positions assigned to Amherst were not taken away from UM/Boston 
but were, rather, a reduction in the net additions to UM/Boston on 
the basis of the 15:1 ratio in light of downward revision of that 
campus's revised enrollment projections. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the list of tenure recommendations, UM/ 
Boston, as detailed in DOC. T73-163. 

Chairman Troy invited Dean Soutter to speak to the item, 
Use of Title of Assistant, UM/Worcester (DOC. T73-162) . Dr. Soutter 
indicated that the only assistant title now used by the University 
applied to research. He requested Trustee approval of use of the 
title of Assistant at the Medical School where it will apply below 
the rank of Instructor. The title is commonly used in medical 
schools. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
establish the title of Assistant at the Medical 
School, UM/Worcester. 

Dean Soutter recommended the appointment of Dr. Neal C. 
Brown as Associate Professor in Biochemistry with tenure at the 
Medical School. He now has tenure at the University of Maryland. 
His salary is to be paid by the federal government. 

Chairman Troy and President Wood commended Dean Soutter 
for the level of this appointment. It was then moved, seconded and 



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COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board that Dr. Neal C. Brown 
be appointed Associate Professor in Biochemistry 
with tenure at the Medical School, UM/Worcester. 

With concurrence of Chairman Troy, Dean Soutter presented 
a nonagenda item concerning the status of Assistant Professor Keller 
Ln Orthopedic Surgery who, like many other faculty at the Medical 
School, is on one-third salary, with the balance of his income paid 
from outside sources. Professor Keller requests retirement rights 
on the one-third salary the University is paying him. Furthermore, 
since his status is under review, he has not yet received any payment 
for services rendered. 

University Counsel Searson opined that the real issue is 
whether or not a person can obtain a multiple salary while on the 
state payroll. There are serious problems with this. Various 
nethods of handling the situation administratively were discussed. 

It was agreed that no Trustee action is necessary. Presi- 
dent Wood will send a letter to the University Personnel Office 
authorizing payment of salary to date, pending full determination by 
University Counsel of the status of Professor Keller's employment 
conditions. 



I 



The meeting was adjourned at 2:30 p.m. 




RdlSert 
Secretary, 




tney ' 
ard of Trustee 



4121. 



F & EP Comm. 
4-23-73 

UM/Worcester — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ment in Depart- 
ment of 
Biochemistry 



UM/Worcester — 
Request from 
Dr. Keller 



COMMITTEE 



Proposed Revision 
of Board of 
Trustees Bylaws, 
Draft #4 
(DOC. T73-031) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
April 24, 1973; 12:30 p.m.; President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 

Wood; Trustees Croce, Crowley, Knowles , Pumphret, Rowland, 
Troy; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary McCartney; Ms. Pugh, 
recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : University Counsel Searson 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery 

UM/ Bos ton : Prof . Lyons , representing the Faculty 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



The meeting was called to order at 12:45 p.m. President 
Wood asked the Secretary to present the Proposed Revisions to the 
Board of Trustees Bylaws, Draft #4 (DOC. T73-031) to the Committee. 



Secretary McCartney, in a background summary, briefly 
explained that the bylaws adopted by the Board in 1966 were out-of- 
date. He reminded the Committee that he was asked by President Wood 
to draft an updated version of the bylaws. At the same time, the 
Pancampus Study Group on University Governance began its work and 
it soon became evident that changes proposed in the new Governance 
Document would have an effect on the bylaws so final revisions were 
deferred until that document was acted upon by the Trustees. Since 
the Governance Document has now been adopted (meeting of April 4, 
1973), it is appropriate at this time to move forward with review 
of the bylaws revision. 

President Wood suggested that this meeting be a working 
session on the proposed revisions and that the subsequent new draft 
be distributed to the full Board for action at the June meeting of 
the Board. 

The Committee then discussed extensively the proposed new 
bylaws with the assistance of University Counsel Searson. 

After completing the review, the Committee requested that 
the Secretary and the University Counsel work on the draft incor- 
porating the suggestions and revisions made during today's meeting. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
considering personnel matters. 



] 



COMMITTEE 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

It was later moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To come out of executive session to consider the 
final item on the agenda. 

President Wood reminded the Committee that the Board voted 
last May to adopt an off -campus recruitment policy for the Boston 
campus for a one-year period. Acting Chancellor Hamilton has written 
the President requesting that, on the basis of a one-year experience 
at UM/Boston, the Trustees be requested to extend the provisions of 
their vote on this matter taken at the meeting of May 10, 1972, for 
an additional year (DOC. T73-147 previously mailed to the Committee). 
Dr. Wood explained that the campus felt that the present system of 
off -campus recruitment had been relatively successful. It is diffi- 
cult, however, to estimate what effect the move to Columbia Point 
may have on such a policy. Therefore, in order to assess this effect 
the campus has recommended this extension so that the present policy 
on off-campus recruitment may be maintained during a transitional 
period. 

After further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that the 
off-campus recruitment policy for the UM/Boston 
campus, as adopted by the Board of Trustees on 
May 10, 1972, for a one-year period, be extended 
for an additional year. 

The meeting was adjourned at 3:15 p.m. 



4123 



Exec. Comm. 
4-24-73 



UM/Boston — 
On-campus 
Recruitment 
(DOC. T73-147) 



] 




Robert J. 
Secretary, 



Lrtney 
5ard of Trustee/ 




4124 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 
Status Report 
on Alcoholic 
Beverages Policy 
(DOC. T73-174) 



UM/Amherst — 
Progress Report 
on Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(DOC. T73-172) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON STUDENT ACTIVITIES 
May 9, 1973; 2:30 p.m.; President's Office, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Rowland, President 

Wood; Trustees Apostola, Boyden, Chandler, Kelly, Snowden; 
Secretary McCartney; Ms. Pugh, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : University Counsel Searson 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Gage, Dr. Frederick Preston; 
Special Assistant to the Vice Chancellor, Mr. Jeff Howard; 
from the Student Senate, Mr. Tom Merrigan 

UM/Boston : Mr. Richard Eckman, representing Acting Chan- 
cellor Hamilton 

Trustee-elect, UM/Boston Campus : Reginald Cagle 

Chairman Rowland convened the meeting at 2:40 p.m. 

Mr. Richard Eckman, representing Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
introduced the newly-elected student Trustee from the Boston campus, 
Reginald Cagle. He also announced that the final membership list 
for the Search Committee for a Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 
at UM/Boston should be approved by the University Assembly at its 
next meeting. The Committee would then begin its work. 

The Chairman then turned to the agenda item, Status Report 
on Alcoholic Beverages Policy, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-174). No action 
by the Committee on this matter is needed at this time. Vice Chan- 
cellor Gage explained that the Amherst campus has been reevaluating 
the present Trustee Policy on Alcoholic Beverages (DOC. T73-034) due 
to many factors including the recent lowering of the drinking age 
in Massachusetts and overcrowded conditions in the Blue Wall Room 
of the Campus Center. Student sentiment on this issue is being 
solicited. 

In response to a query, Dr. Gage explained that he wanted 
the Trustees to be aware that the campus was reviewing this policy. 
A new proposal for an Alcoholic Beverages Policy will be submitted 
to the Trustees next fall. In the meantime, the question of liquor 
licenses for separate locations is to be checked out by Counsel. 

The Committee then considered the Progress Report on 
Counseling, Advising and Support Services (DOC. T73-172) submitted 



I 



by the Amherst campus. The Chairman reported that the Committee 
had not had adequate time to review the document. She called on 
President Wood to comment. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Dr. Wood informed the Committee that he had testified Tues- 
day, May 8, 1973, on the FY 1974 budget for the University. He 
explained that a central theme in support of the budget was that the 
University is moving into a new phase in development and that support 
for nonacademic programs was needed. Dr. Wood had pointed out in 
his testimony that a serious weakness exists in the area of counseling, 
advising and support services on the campuses. This is a new area of 
need for the University, one that is not readily grasped by the 
Legislature. The President said that the best possible support 
material is necessary to defend this need. He also noted that the 
President's Office had responded favorably to the campus budget 
request. 

Chairman Rowland then requested Dr. Gage to comment on the 
report. The Vice Chancellor explained that the report, in brief, 
presented a statement of goals determined by the Student Affairs 
staff and a statement of what has been accomplished in the process of 
obtaining those goals. He introduced his Special Assistant, Dr. Fred 
Preston. 

Dr. Preston outlined the report, Student Affairs Division 
3oals and Accomplishments 1972-73 (DOC. T73-172) for the Committee. 



He explained that the overall approach used in developing the docu- 
ment accented the following: 

1. The apparent lack (among the constituencies of com- 
munication and accountability; 

2. The transitionary period for the area of Student 
Affairs; and 

3. The pressure on the Student Affairs staff to service a 
more pluralistic type of community. 

He said that the report follows a basic form of stating a 
desired goal; listing the immediate objectives; and examining the 
specific activities developed to reach that goal. The following are 
recommended goals : 

a. "To assume a major role in influencing and setting 
direction of the University's educational objectives; 

b. "To develop a general climate and multiple opportunities 
for personal growth and professional development of 
students and staff members of the University community; 

c. "To make tangible and concrete progress in the area of 
Affirmative Action; and 

d. "To promote and implement organizational change which 
facilitates the present priority goals of Student 
Affairs." 

In response to Trustee Snowden's question regarding the 
amphasis on internal communication, Dr. Preston explained that the 
Student Affairs staff felt it necessary to organize and develop them- 



4125 

Stu. Act. 
5-9-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Progress Report 
on Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(DOC. T73-172) 



4126 



Stu. Act. Comm. 
5-9-73 

UM/ Amherst — 
Progress Report 
on Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 

COMMITTEE 

(DOC. T73-172) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

selves before reaching out to the community. Vice Chancellor Gage 
also felt it extremely important for the staff to "determine its 
goals and resources and then put them to best use." It was also 
observed that there has been student approval for what has been tak- 
ing place v in the reorganization. There is a question outstanding 
whether Career Counseling and the Placement Service should merge. 

Trustee Apostola queried why this report had not been sub- 
mitted to the Student Senate Student Matters Committee. Chairman 
Rowland explained that the report was prepared for and at the request 
of this Committee. Dr. Gage added that he felt the report would have 
wide distribution. 

The general discussion which followed included profiles of 
average counselors , referral procedures , various methods of counsel- 
ing and mental health. 

Trustee Snowden inquired whether the models developed for 
the Amherst campus could be applicable at UM/Boston. Dr. Gage 
responded that the process and models were universal and could be 
applied to any other institution. He added that his staff could be 
retrained to a modern educational system, rather than recruiting new 
personnel. 

Trustee Chandler asked what was being done for the commuter 
students. Dr. Gage reported that his staff was in the process of 
developing a center for commuter students to become more familiar 
with University resources. He assured the Committee that his staff 
would be moving forward in the fall. 

After further discussion, Chairman Rowland said she would 
be looking forward to another progress report in the fall. 

The Chairman then explained that Mr. Tom Merrigan, a stu- 
dent from the Amherst campus , had contacted her regarding the trans- 
fer of the Student Activities staff funding from the Campus Center 
Budget. She had advised Mr. Merrigan to contact Dr. Gage on this 
matter to determine if this was an appropriate item for Trustee 
consideration. She then asked whether the Committee would be willing 
to hear an outline of this problem. The Committee assented. Dr. 
Gage was asked to summarize the situation. 

The Vice Chancellor explained that funding for the Student 
Activities staff had originally come from the Campus Center/Student 
Union budget. Last year, a motion was made to transfer the funding 
to the Student Activities Trust Fund (SATF) budget. The administra- 
tion had asked the Student Senate for a year's delay to look at all 
the related issues. This year both the Student Senate and the 
Campus Center Board of Governors approved the recommended transfer 
of the entire Student Activities financial support to the SATF. The 
staff would then report to a Student Activities Policy Council. The 
Vice Chancellor said he felt that this was an Amherst campus adminis- 
tration problem which has no policy implication that needs to be 
considered by the Board of Trustees. 



P 



f 



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COMMITTEE 



1 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Merrigan briefly explained his >position. He said that 
he did not see this as simply an administrative matter. The proposed 
transfer, he said, would eliminate graduate student support of the 
Student Activities staff. He also said that he was opposed to the 
Student Senate assuming more authority. 

Trustee Apostola explained that this matter had been 
thoroughly debated over the past year and that the Graduate Student 
Senate has approved the transfer. 

After further discussion, Chairman Rowland directed Vice 
Chancellor Gage to prepare a letter to the President explaining this 
situation in detail. The President will notify the Committee of 
further developments. 

The meeting was adjourned at 4:00 p.m. 




Robert J 
Secretary, 



artney 
oard of Trust 




412? 



Stu. Act. 
5-9-73 



Comm. 



UM/ Amherst — 
Progress Report 
on Counseling, 
Advising and 
Support Services 
(DOC. T73-172) 



4128 



COMMITTEE 



UM/ Amherst — 

Proposed Parking 

Fees 

(DOC. T73-158) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May 15, 1973; 5:00 p.m.; Ballroom, Student Union, UM/Amherst 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret; Trustee 
Apostola, Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustees : Abrams, Sullivan, Troy 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Campion, Planning Officer 
Littlefield; William Lambert, Acting Director, Transporta- 
tion and Parking Office; William Goss, Project Director, 
DOT Grant; Paul Shuldiner, Chairman, Transportation and 
Parking Council 

Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 5:05 p.m. 
for the purpose of hearing opinions and comments on the Proposed 
Parking Fees, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-158). He stated that, two years 



ago, the Board had requested the Amherst administration to submit a 
traffic and parking plan to minimize the vehicular problems develop- 
ing on that campus. Prior to that time, the Town of Amherst had 
requested the Trustees to call for a study of the matter. The plan 
submitted to become effective September 1, 1973, sets parking fees 
of $19.00 to $70.00 per year scaled by location in addition to a 
basic $5.00 registration fee. It also provides for secured overnight 
parking for $12.00 and reserved spaces at $125.00 per year as well 
as the installation of 300 additional parking meters. The Chancellor 
would be delegated authority to revise the fee schedule within the 
amounts approved. The thirteen buses now operating under the DOT 
Grant would be purchased when that agreement expires in January 1974. 

Because of requests from a number of groups and individuals 
on the Amherst campus to be heard by the Trustees before Board 
action, the item was not acted on at the Board meeting of May 2, 1973 
and that meeting was recessed until May 25 to provide the opportunity 
being offered today. Chairman Pumphret then read the Rules of Pro- 
cedure prepared by Secretary McCartney for the conduct of this meet- 
ing. 

The following outlines briefly the comments and suggestions 
made by representatives and individual spokesmen among the 300 or so 
persons attending the meeting. It identifies the speaker by group 
or position at UM/Amherst. Except where enclosed in quotation marks, 
all statements are condensed, indirect quotations. The comments 
follow: 



j 



COMMITTEE 



] 



1 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Professor Terence Burke, Faculty Senate . Senate narrowly 
(30:27) defeats motion of concern requesting that "appropriate con- 
ferences be held before new fee schedules are adopted." General 
faculty votes that the faculty is concerned with the problems, high 
costs, and "discriminatory character" of the parking fees proposed 
by the Transportation and Parking Council; faculty requests careful 
consultation with all appropriate constituencies before Board insti- 
tutes such increases. Prof. Burke states faculty has no enthusiasm 
for proposed increases, is concerned that fee schedule discriminates 
against lower-paid members of the campus community. 

Bernard Turner, President, Mass. State Employees Associa- 
tion, UM/Amherst, himself prohibited from speaking because of unfair 



labor practice charge filed against University, introduces Robert 
Derusha, a member, who states: Parking Proposal counter to Affirma- 
tive Action commitment and HEW Guidelines; discriminates against 
lower-paid employees. Continue present method and install additional 
parking areas. Special arrangement should be made for new employees 
to defer payment. 

Ms. Carol Drew, President, Local 1776, AFL-CIO . Reads 
letters re collective bargaining, unfair labor charge, and issue of 
increased parking fees. Presents petition subscribed to by Local 
1776; also, by AAUP, MSEA, all campus Senates, Mass. Society of 
Professors, and Ad Hoc Committee on Parking. These request delay of 
Board action until information has been circulated and discussions 
have taken place. 

Randall W. Dahl, Executive Board, Professional Association , 
UM/Amherst. Plan in unworkable, inequitable, imcomplete, and unac- 
ceptable. Lower-cost parking areas will not accommodate demand. Bus 
service is not available to everyone on year-round basis. No long- 
range solution without additional parking facilities. Refer matter 
to "truly representative campus committee" charged to propose "reason 
able solutions." 

David Booker, Speaker, Student Senate . Transportation and 
Parking Council members charged not to disclose fees until Dr. Gage 
announced them on April 19 (Thursday before Finance Committee con- 
sidered plan on Tuesday, April 23). Prefer uniform fee. Everyone 
should have ample opportunity to study plan and propose alternatives. 

Julian T. Martindale, Professional Employee, Physical Plant 
Ethical, moral, and legal objections. Concerned about future of plan 
Actually taxing employees to finance bussing. Violates Article 23 of 
the State Constitution. 

Peter E. Royal, Student, Orchard Hill . Misconception to 
say weekly charge small; many fees increasing and total becoming 
sizeable. Not equitable plan; some persons exempted if parking charge 
included in rent at University Apartments, North Village, etc. 



4129 

Finance Comm. 
5-15-73 



UM/Amherst — 

Proposed Parking 

Fees 

(DOC. T73-158) 

Faculty Senate — 
Prof . Burke 



UMSEA— 
Robert Derusha 



Local 1776, 
AFL-CIO— 
Carol Drew 



Professional 
Association — 
Randall W. Dahl 



Student Senate — 
David Booker 



Employee — 

J. T. Martindale 



Student — 
Peter E. Royal 



Finance Comm. 
5-15-73 

UM/ Amherst — 

Proposed Parking 

Fees 

(DOC. T73-158) 

„ - COMMITTEE 

Employee — 
Leo Lieberman 

Student — 
John Tyndall 



Faculty — 
David Biddle 



Employee — 
John Daly 



Employee — 
S. Kozloski 

Graduate Student- 
Nicholas Karlac 



Employee — 
Frank Olbris 



Graduate Student- 
Charles Karen 



Employee — 
Edmund Cadran 



Employee 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Leo Lieberman, Engineer, Physical Plant . Amherst campus 
Administration uses political tactics in presenting plan; is mis- 
trusted because of "past performance.'" Parking places always avail- 
able somewhere; presents photos of parking lots to substantiate. 
Plan designed to subsidize bus program. Calls for returning plan 
to Amherst Administration with instructions to set up truly repre- 
sentative committee. 

John D. Tyndall, Student on Transportation and Parking 
Council . Should construct additional parking lots. Need enforcement 
of regulations; 20,000 tickets have been written since Jan. 1, 1973. 

David Biddle, Faculty, History . Details not released 
until few days before Trustee Committee meeting. Subscribes to 
returning plan to Transportation and Parking Council. Faculty con- 
cerned about discriminatory nature of fees. Should have faculty 
lots with higher fees; staff and student lots with lower fees. Pro- 
vide parking in outlying areas with shuttle-bus service. 

John Daly, Employee, Member of Local 1776 . Need more 
parking spaces; much illegal parking now. Bus service available 
only when students are here. 

Stephen Kozloski, Employee, Physical Plant . Plan as pro- 
posed violates Chapter 75, Article 14, of the Mass. General Laws. 

Nicholas Karlac, Graduate Student . Demand greater than 
space available for $5.00 spaces. Proposes uniform fee. Include 
additional parking lots in budget as priority item. Amherst in 
rural area; no form of public transportation available. Plan needs 
more study and "input." 

Frank Olbris, Employee, Mail Room . Original Campus Master 
Plan recommends peripheral parking with auto-free campus interior. 
Parking lots not maintained well; points out "selective neglect." 

Charles Karen (?), Graduate Student . Should not have to 
pay for security protection. If subsidizing bus service, should be 
flat rate for everyone on campus, not just those using cars. 

Edmund Cadran, Employee, Physical Plant . Works shifts; 
sometimes days , sometimes nights . Plan would have him pay fee same 
as employee working only days. (Was told there would be Appeal 
Board to consider special cases.) 



money . 



Employee (did not give name) . Biggest problem is no 
Charge everyone a percentage for a definite period. 



Chairman Pumphret expressed appreciation to the audience 
for their opinions and comments. He assured everyone that the 
sense of the objections expressed would be provided to the Board 
before a decision is made. He noted also that the Chancellor, UM/ 
Amherst, will be responsible for implementing the details of any plan 
finally approved. 



j 



COMMITTEE 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The meeting was adjourned at 7:45 p.m. 




Secretary, 



tney 
ard of Trustees 




4131 

Finance Comm. 
5-15-73 



J 



4132 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 

Motor Vehicle 

Regulations, 

1973-74 

(DOC. T73-178) 



UM/Amherst — 

Campus Traffic 

Signs 

(DOC. T72-130) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MEETING OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

May 22, 1973; 10:00 a.m.; President's Office, One Washington Mall 

Boston, Mass. 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Knowles , President 
Wood; Trustees Chandler and Pumphret; Secretary McCartney 

Visiting Trustee : Cagle 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Ms. 
Robinson, Architectural Consultant Roth; Messrs. Kaplan 
and O'Leary, Ms. Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Director of Public Safety Johnston 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton; Messrs. Freeland 
and Rawn; Professor Thurman 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter, Mr. Reno 



Chairman Knowles invited Director of Public Safety David 
Johnston to present the first item, Motor Vehicle Regulations, 1973- 
74, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-178) . Mr. Johnston outlined the main 



changes proposed: the new regulations will permit the towing of 
vehicles in lots to which they are not assigned; also towing of 
unregistered cars; also, officers and security guards will be made 
eligible to authorize towing. At present, that authorization is 
reserved for the level of sergeant and above. 

Chairman Knowles called attention to Article VIII, 
Section 1, on serious offenses, noting that the definition had been 
broadened to include driving under the influence of controlled sub- 
stances as defined under Chapter 94A of the General Laws of Massa- 
chusetts. 

Trustee Pumphret observed that the authority for towing 
and implementing the other regulations has been available for some 
time. He hopes, now, that the regulations will be enforced. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Motor Vehicle Regulations, 1973-74, 
UM/Amherst as detailed in DOC. T7 3-178. 

Mr. Johnston next requested permission of Chairman Knowles 
and President Wood to introduce a nonagenda item, and it was granted 
He presented a map of the Amherst campus, indicating the re-signing 
of certain intersections and other sign changes requiring Trustee 
approval. 



] 



COMMITTEE 



J 



I 



and 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

After explanation to the Committee, it was moved, seconded 



VOTED: To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the re-signing of the UM/Amherst campus 
as described in DOC. T73-130 (revised 1973), 
said document being on file in the District 
Court of Hampshire County. 

Chairman Knowles turned next to the Status Report on Move 
to Columbia Point. This was presented by Acting Chancellor Hamilton 



It is tentatively planned that administrative and academic functions 
will start to move from 100 Arlington Street to Columbia Point in 
July. More than 30 functions are involved. The actual dates depend 
upon adequate funds and personnel to operate there. Presently, both 
funds and personnel are inadequate. 

Dr. Hamilton then recited a schedule of offices and 
service units which would move first; basically, those not requiring 
daily contact with students and faculty. 

President Wood reported that Dr. Hamilton had testified 
eloquently before the Ways and Means Committee recently on the need 
for positions at Columbia Point. A meeting has been held with Mr. 
Kelly, Manager of the MBTA, and rapid transit negotiations are under- 
way. The Ad Hoc Committee on University-Community Relations of the 
Board of Trustees will meet tomorrow on problems related to the 
Columbia Point move at 5:30 p.m., prior to bringing recommendations 
to the Board of Trustees at its meeting on June 6, 1973. 

Dr. Hamilton stated that permission of the Trustees would 
be required so that the MDC might do certain grading work on Univer 
sity property. A vote on this matter will be requested in the future 

The next item, Approval of Space Program for Building 080/2 



(DOC. T73-179— see also DOC. T73-114) was also presented by Acting 
Chancellor Hamilton. 

Dr. Hamilton observed that a task force consisting of 
representatives of the President's Office and the UM/Boston Adminis- 
tration had worked long and hard on the Space Program, summarized 
in DOCS. T73-114 and T73-179. He commended Ms. Robinson; also Messrs 
Freeland and Rawn together with Professor Thurman. 

President Wood commented on three aspects of change which 
had converged simultaneously affecting changes in the development of 
Building 080/2 as follows: 

1. Change in the pattern of curriculum development; 

2. Change in size of the campus due to revised enrollment 
projections; and 

3. The basic change in the pattern of student life. 



4133 

B & G Comm. 
5-22-73 

UM/Amherst — 

Campus Traffic 

Signs 

(DOC. T72-130) 



UM/Boston — 
Move to 

Columbia Point- 
Status Report 



UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Space Program, 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. T73-179) 



B & G Comm. 
5-22-73 

UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Space Program, 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. T73-179) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton reminded the Committee that the 
appropriation for designs and foundation of the building were avail- 
able; now we have the designs. The Space Program has been completed 
with today's submission. Therefore, after today's meeting, given 
Trustee approval, the architects will be instructed to proceed with 
the project. 

Trustee Pumphret cautioned that some activities and services 
planned for Building 080/2 at no cost are being provided to students 
(e.g. student newspaper, bookstore, etc.) on the Amherst campus at 
a fee of $60 ($75 next semester). He urged that the President be 
ready to request the Legislature to give relief on this issue to 
students at UM/ Amherst. Discussion followed on the necessity for 
conforming policies and procedures on all three campuses in the 
matter of equity treatment for services rendered, with or without 
fees, in such areas as parking spaces, student bookstores, and hous- 
ing of various student activities. 

Richard Freeland then introduced Mr. Will Prince, Planning 
Department, UM/Boston, who explained the details of a wall chart 
tracing the development of Building 080/2 from 1971 and the selectior 
of Architects Collaborative as the designers (by the Designer Selec- 
tion Board of the Commonwealth) to a period when alterations in 
design were effected by the Task Force formed last August. The Task 
Force had reported its recommendations in February, 1973. 

Since that time, in view of the fact that the 080/2 appro- 
priation under Chapter 976 called for a science building and an 
academic program change is now involved, BBC will not release furthet 
funds until a change in phraseology is effected. This will be 
included in the next capital outlay request; also, some further 
editing is to be done in the program before presenting it to BBC for 
issuance to the architects. 

Mr. Prince focused especially on the more flexible oppor- 
tunity afforded to locate the building on the Columbia Point site by 
reason of dropping plans for Colleges V and VI. It was also pointed 
out that the height requirements have been relaxed, and that the 
requirements imposed by the acoustical consultants have been too 
stringent. The effect of this is toadd flexibility which will be taker 
into account in moving forward with the construction. Completion is 
scheduled in three to five years . 

Chairman Knowles requested that the architects be requestec 
to develop that end of the site so as to preserve the view from the 
Mall. 

Dr. Hamilton stressed that Phase I of the campus at 
Columbia Point, as presently constituted, "is not a viable campus" 
(for an enrollment of 12,500) without adding facilities. Essentiallj 
it now consists of two classroom buildings, a library and an admin- 
istration building. 



r 



I 



I 



] 



COMMITTEE 



1 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Mr. Freeland indicated that the space requirements for Fine 
Arts remains the same as described to the Committee in March. The 
Fine Arts complex would be moving to 080/2 from the originally pro- 
jected Theatre Program Building. This brings it from the fringes of 
campus to the actual spine. 

The current report reflects no change in planning for stu- 
dent activities including the bookstore, administrative space, etc. 
The Task Force is aware of Trustee Pumphret's concerns with regard to 
disparate procedures among the campuses. The problem, Mr. Freeland 
said, is to balance this concern with other concerns. Another major 
issue is to balance the aggregates of space allocated for various 
purposes versus those available for the same purposes in the Colleges 
at UM/Boston. It is hoped to make the 080/2 end of the campus an 
exciting and active focus for the student life at Columbia Point. 

The student activities section is essentially unchanged 
from the February report, and was drafted with awareness of Trustee 
Pumphret ' s concerns . 

Student services include Counseling, Mental Health, Voca- 
tional Counseling and the Infirmary — all part of the student services 
complex, and essentially unchanged since the February report. The 
reduction of 1,950 feet in the summary space program is due to 
removal of the inpatient facility from the Infirmary. 

A net reduction of 2,226 sq. feet in the total space 
program derives mainly from a reduction in Chemistry and the Health 
facility and will probably go in part at least to Psychology for 
research labs. Specialized construction will be required to house 
a proposed accelerator. 

In the Fine Arts area, the type and size of the theatre 
facility remains as a key issue. It was noted also that the entire 
program is being reviewed by Vice Chancellor Marshall. 

Mr. Freeland concluded that, the final area of uncertainty 
involves design of the student service area. This includes the 
health services. Certain other services will be assigned to unspecia 
ized spaces. 



and 



After a brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, 



VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

acpept the program for the Arts and Sciences Build- 
ings, UM/Boston, (Building 080/2), with the under- 
standing (1) that the final project in building 
envelopes will be reviewed by the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee when they are developed; (2) that 
further refinement of internal space arrangements 
in Building 080/2 will go forward; and (3) that the 
President's Office will undertake a comparative 



3d 

B & G Comm. 
5-22-73 

UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Space Program, 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. T73-179) 



L- 



4136 

B & G Comm. 
5-22-73 



UM/Boston — 
Approval of 
Space Program, 
Building 080/2 
(DOC. T73-179) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Status of 
Extensions of 
Leases for 
Buildings at 
Park Square 
Campus 
(DOC. T73-180) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Analysis of University-wide space policy in the 
areas of housing, parking, and student activities, 
as illustrated in the space program for Building 
080/2. 

Acting Chancellor Hamilton advised the Committee that this 
meeting will be the last time that Mr. Prince will be present, as 
he is leaving in July. Chairman Knowles extended thanks on behalf 
of all of the Trustees for the excellent services provided by Mr. 
Prince in the Planning Area during his tenure at UM/Boston. 

Chairman Knowles introduced the next agenda item, Status 
of Extensions of Leases for Buildings at Park Square Campus (DOC. 
T73-180). 

President Wood observed that, at the beginning of operations 
at UM/Boston, standard five-year leases from the Superintendent of 
Buildings were used with options to renew at 60 or 90 days. Renewals; 
were then made at the administrative levels as necessary in accor- 
dance with customary state practice. 

The President continued that it has not always been clear 
which leases should go before the Board of Trustees. As the move 
to Columbia Point has been studied during the past two months, the 
objective has been to maximize the use of new space at Columbia 
Point, while minimizing any overlap with old space at 100 Arlington 
Street. The vote requested of the Committee, therefore, will 
validate the Chancellor's authority re past leases executed, and 
strengthen his hand as he approaches the problem of developing new 
leases as necessary during this transitional period. 

Dr. Hamilton reported that there is not apparent need for 
any presently leased building after the end of February 1974. The 
library and the Sawyer Building, however, represent a problem. They 
are leased to September, 1974. No notice has yet been sent on 
extending the Library lease; an additonal month remains in which to 
work on this. 

Chairman Knowles inquired whether or not any other leases 
might not be terminated at an early date. Dr. Hamilton responded 
that we might terminate, or vacate, which would cause some strain. 
For example, the Hale Building, 1972 Columbus Avenue, will terminate 
automatically on November 22, 1973, and it is his intention to termi 
nate on that date and vacate, even though some strain may ensue. 

Chairman Knowles queried whether subletting would be 
possible in some cases. This may be possible with the Sawyer Build- 
ing in the event of hard negotiations. 

The President called for the vote. 

After brief further discussion it was moved, seconded, and 



i 



i 



i 



4137 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 
ratify all extensions of leases for the Boston 
campus executed from 1972 to date under the 
direction of the Chancellor or Acting Chancellor, 
and that it delegate to the Chancellor or Acting 
Chancellor authority to execute all further 
extensions for 1973, provided, however, that said 
further extensions be first approved by the 
President of the University. 

Chairman Knowles registered disapproval of the construction 
signs at the Columbia Point site which are visible from Morrissey 
Boulevard. It was pointed out that the posting of such signs is 
part of the construction contract. The University is powerless to 
remove them. 

The Committee turned next to the final agenda item, Pro- 
posed Parking Facility, UM/Worcester (DOC. T73-182) . 

Chairman Knowles invited comment from architectural con- 
sultant Roth. Mr. Roth noted that the Trustees had received the 
report of the Planning Office which documents the need for the 
parking facility in terms of the number of visitors. The need 
should be considered in light of the needs of a medical center. The 
demands are very different from those imposed by student parking. 
The medical facility at Worcester will function 24 hours a day, 
365 days a year with requirements imposed by staff on a site that 
is restricted in size and with rocky topography. 

Trustee Pumphret noted that the Legislature will want to 
review the results of a feasibility study on the parking garage, 
including an estimate of cost. 

President Wood queried whether the project should be 
handled by the University Building Authority or via the usual 
capital outlay route. Assistant Counsel O'Leary was asked whether 
it is possible to lease privately on state land and responded that 
there may be ways to accomplish this. The matter will need to be 
further explored. 

Mr. Pumphret emphasized that, if private leasing on state 
land is ruled illegal then the project must go forward by capital 
outlay requests. 

President Wood added that the issue cannot go to the 
Legislature at all until the question of the Deficiency Budget is 
resolved. 



B & G Comm. 
5-22-73 

UM/ Bos ton — 
Status of 
Extensions of 
Leases for Build- 
ings at Park 
Square Campus 
(DOC. T73-180) 



UM/Worcester — 
Proposed Parking 
Facility 
(DOC. T73-182) 



After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded 



and 



4138 

B & G Comm. 
5-22-73 



UM/Worcester — 
Proposed Park- 
ing Facility 
(DOC. T73-182) 

COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that it 

direct the President to explore the feasibility 
of constructing, financing, and managing a parking 
facility at the University of Massachusetts 
campus in Worcester. 

Chairman Knowles forwarded to Mr. Roth a news clipping 
which contained an outline of a rooftop parking plan. She requested 
that he look into this matter. 

Dean Soutter felt that the project should now move forward 
He felt that sufficient studies had already been conducted. 

Dean Soutter was invited to discuss damage caused recently 
at the Medical School by a break in the water main which flooded the 
basement of the Medical Science Building. The Dean responded that 
the damage to electric motors and switching gear would be covered by 
the contractor's insurance. 

Mrs. Knowles queried once again whether any housing planned 
at UM/Worcester should be constructed on state capital outlay or by 
the University Building Authority. 

Mrs. Knowles welcomed Trustee Cagle, representing the stu- 
dent body at UM/Boston, to his first meeting as a student Trustee. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:35 a.m. 




>ert J. 
Secretary, 




■artney 

of Trustees 




J 



COMMITTEE 



II 



Jl 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE COMMITTEE ON FINANCE 
May 23, 1973; 10:00 a.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Pumphret, President 
Wood; Trustees Apostola, Robertson, Rowland; Treasurer 
Johnson; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Cagle 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Phillips, Budget 
Officer Gartenberg, Assistant Counsel O'Leary, Ms. Pugh 

UM/Amherst : Vice Chancellor Campion, Planning Officer 
Littlefield, Budget Director Gulko; William Lambert, 
Acting Director, Transportation and Parking Office; Paul 
Shuldiner, Chairman, Transportation and Parking Council 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 

Chairman Pumphret called the meeting to order at 10:05 a. 
and asked for consideration of the Fund Transfer, UM/Amherst (DOC. 
T73-190), to cover an anticipated deficit because of expanded tele- 
phone service. President Wood noted that, as the budgetary process 
improves, the requests for transfers will be minimal. On motion 
made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the following transfer at UM/Amherst: 

FROM: 

Account 13 (Special Supplies and Expenses) $30,000 



m 



TO: 



Account 14 (Administrative Expenses) 



$30,000 



Regarding Fund Transfers, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-190) , Acting 
Chancellor Hamilton pointed out that such requests have been reduced 
gradually over the past three years. The request today basically 
covers summer expenses as well as increased telephone and postage 
expenditures . 

Trustee Robertson questioned the mailing policy to Trustees 
He was assured by Chairman Pumphret that, while the Board should at 
all times be kept informed, the Secretary reviews and screens 
material to be mailed. President Wood mentioned Trustee Boyden's 
suggestion of a summary document for lengthy transmittals. After 
further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 



4139 



UM/Amherst — 
Fund Transfer 
(DOC. T73-190) 



UM/Boston — 
Fund Transfers 
(DOC. T73-190) 



4140 

Finance Comm. 
5-23-73 



UM/Boston — 
Fund Transfers 
(DOC. T73-190) 



COMMITTEE 



Purchase of Land 

in Ohio 

(DOC. T73-181) 



(DOC. T73-181) by developers as recommended by Attorney P, 
bury, Trustee of the Lincoln Trust. 



VOTED : 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the following transfers at UM/Boston: 



FROM: 

Account 08 (Utilities) 
Account 13 



Account 15 
Account 16 



(Special Supplies) 

(Equipment) 

(Rentals) 



$20,000 

32,000 

8,000 

10,000 



TO: 



Account 03 (Nonemployees) 

Account 14 (Administrative Expe nses) 

$70,000 



$50,000 

20,000 

$70,000 



The Committee then considered the Purchase of Land in Ohio 



L. Thorn- 



Treasurer Johnson reviewed two offers received for the 
143.5 acres of land in the Murray D. and Anne H. Lincoln Trust. Both 
the Treasurer and Chairman Pumphret expressed confidence in Mr. 
Thornbury's dedication to the interests of the Lincoln family and to 
the University. Following discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize the Treasurer of the University, Kenneth 
W. Johnson, to enter into an agreement in the name 
of and on behalf of the Trustees of the University 
of Massachusetts with Nationwide Development Co., 
other Nationwide subsidiaries, and or with the 
Schottensteins for the sale of all of the land with 
buildings thereon on Sunbury Road, Blendon Township, 
Franklin County, Ohio, consisting of sixty-nine and 
one-half (69.5) acres more or less held in the name 
of the Trustees and seventy-four (74) acres more or 
less held for the Trustees in the Murray D. and Anne 
H. Lincoln Trust, said agreement to be on the terms, 
conditions and consideration as described in letter 
dated May 14, 1973, from P. L. Thornbury, Esquire, 
Trustee of the Lincoln Trust to Kenneth W. Johnson 
as presented to this meeting, Document T73-181, and 
to take such other action as may be necessary to 
bring about said sale. 

Mr. Johnson noted that, after consummation of this sale, 
the residue of the Trust is of minimal value. Chairman Pumphret 
proposed that the remaining items be disposed of as soon as possible. 
The Committee is to be kept informed. 



» 



I 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



COMMITTEE 



4141 



Finance Comm. 
5-23-73 



In connection with the Student Activities Trust Fund Budget , UM/Amherst — 
UM/ Amherst (DOC. T73-189) , Budget Director Gulko pointed out that Student 

Activities Trust 



only approval of the annual fees is being requested, not the budget 
itself. Turning first to the Stockbridge Student Senate Activities 
Fee, on motion made and seconded, it was 



VOTED: 



To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
July 1, 1973, the following annual fees be established 
as the Student Activities Fee for Stockbridge Students 
on the Amherst campus: 



II 



I 



Seniors (280) 

Stockbridge Senate Tax 
Distinguished Visitors Program 
Senior Class Tax 



Freshmen — Regular (110) 

Stockbridge Senate Tax 
Distinguished Visitors Program 
Freshman Class Tax 



$35.00 
1.50 
7.50 

$44.00 



$35.00 
1.50 
6.50 

$43.00 



Placement - Off campus for part of one semester (210) 



Stockbridge Senate Tax 
Distinguished Visitors Program 
Freshman Class Tax 



$33.00 
1.50 
6.50 

$41.00 



Fund Budget 
(DOC. T73-189) 



Trustee Apostola then explained the rationale resulting in 
more appropriate support of the Student Activities Office through the 
Student Senate Tax, which also funds such activities as the Collegian 
the Index , and the SWAP Conference. He added that the Campus Center 
Board of Governors, though autonomous to a degree, is also responsible 
to the Student Senate. It should be noted that this allocation 
reduces the Campus Center Fee to $52.00, as provided for in the vote 
of the Board on May 2, 1973. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, effective 
July 1, 1973, the following annual fee of $47.00, 
which includes $45.50 for the Student Senate Tax and 
$1.50 for the Distinguished Visitors Program, be esta- 
blished as the Student Activities Fee for University 
Undergraduate Students on the Amherst campus. 

Dr. Gulko reiterated that the Committee is approving only 
the rate of the fee, not specific items in the budget. Chairman 
Pumphret assured him that authority for allocation of the Trust Fund 
is fully at the campus level. 



4142 

' Finance Comm. 
> 5-23-73 

J UM/Worcester — 
* Use of Medical 
' Science Building 
for Temporary 
Student Housing 

COMMITTEE 

(DOC. T73-198) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

President Wood then introduced discussion on Use of the 
Medical Science Building for Temporary Student Housing, UM/Worces ter 



(DOC. T73-198) . Because recruiting of the clinical faculty at the 
Medical School will be delayed until the hospital nears completion, 
the wing reserved for their use will be vacant for about two years. 
Dean Soutter is requesting that the two top floors of the hospital 
be made available as student housing at a fee comparable to that 
charged the six students presently occupying the house owned by UM/ 
Worcester. He urged a timely decision so that students could be 
notified before they seek housing in the Worcester area, as this 
would place an additional heavy financial burden on many of them. 
Chairman Pumphret stressed the obligation of the Committee to sustain 
equitable University-wide standards. President Wood also noted the 
question of liability and suggested that he undertake further study 
with Dr. Soutter and Messrs. Roth and Littlefield to give the Commit- 
tee a more detailed analysis of the overall situation. It was men- 
tioned that future plans may include apartments near the Medical 
School, also, cooperation with the Worcester consortium in the area 
of graduate housing. The Committee recognizes that there are housing 
problems peculiar to the Medical School, but agreed that action should 
be delayed until such time as additional information has been studied 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:05 a.m. 




Robert J. M ; 
Secretary, 





irtney 
Sard of Trustees 



] 



COMMITTEE 



j 



J 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF MEETING OF COMMITTEE ON FACULTY AND EDUCATIONAL POLICY 
May 23, 1973; 12:30 p.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : President Wood; Trustees 

Apostola, Cagle, Robertson, Shearer; Mr. Callahan, repre- 
senting Commissioner Anrig ; Treasurer Johnson, Secretary 
McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Vice President Edelman, Assistant 
Counsel O'Leary, Ms. Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Vice Chancellor Glucksterr 
Associate Provost Bischoff ; Prof. Burke, representing 
Faculty Senate; Prof. Francis, Head, Food Science and 
Technology; Prof. Pellett, Head, Food Science and 
Nutrition 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Vice CHancellor 
Marshall; Prof. Lyons, representing faculty 

UM/Worcester : Dean Soutter 



Because of Chairman Troy's illness, the meeting was called 
to order by President Wood at 12:45 p.m. 

Before presenting the Tenure Appointment, UM/Worcester 
(DOC. T73-192), Dr. Wood stated for the record Chairman Troy's and 
his own concern about the number of late requests for approval of 
tenure. The President has asked Father Walsh to work with the 
Provosts and Dean Soutter on administrative rules designed to avoid 
this except in cases of genuine emergency. Dean Soutter then 
reviewed the background and qualifications of Dr. Guido Majno for 
appointment as Chairman of the Department of Pathology at the Medica] 
School. On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the appointment of Dr. Guido Majno as 
Professor and Chairman of the Department of 
Pathology, Medical School, UM/Worcester, effective 
September 1, 1973. 

Treasurer Johnson explained that University Participation 
in the Faculty Dependent Exchange Program in Cooperation with the 
New England Land-Grant Institutions (DOC. T73-184) represents a 
"fringe benefit" for the faculty and professional staff on all cam- 
puses by providing in-state tuition status for dependents at 
reciprocating New England Land-Grant Universities. The Universities 
of New Hampshire, Maine, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachu- 
setts have been involved, with Maine and New Hampshire having alreadj 
extended their participation until June 30, 1974. 



4143 



UM/Worces ter — 
Tenure Appoint- 
ment 
(DOC. T73-192) 



University 
Participation in 
Faculty Depen-- 
dent Exchange 
Program in 
Cooperation with 
New England Land- 
Grant Institu- 
tions 
(DOC. T73-184) 



F & EP Comm. 
5-23-73 

University 
Participation in 
Faculty Depen- 
dent Exchange 
Program in 
Cooperay,Qft 1TrEE 
with New England 
Land- Grant 
Institutions 
(DOC. T73-184) 



Proposal for Uni- 

veisity to Enter 

into Agreements 

with Federal 

Extension Service 

USDA 

(DOC. T73-186) 



UM/ Bos ton — 
Tenure Recommen- 
dation, Pauline 
Maier 
(DOC. T73-197) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

The Treasurer recommended authorizing President Wood to 
renew the University's participation in the program for a period of 
up to three years. He pointed out that the agreement applies only 
to admissions at the undergraduate level which have averaged 10-15 
over the past three years. More than 30 UMASS faculty dependents 
take advantage of the policy annually. Acting Chancellor Hamilton 
did not anticipate many out-of-state applications for admission to 
UM/Boston, which is a commuter campus; however, Mr. Costello will be 
requested to check on this. 

It was then moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize the President of the University, Dr. 
Robert C. Wood, to enter into an agreement 
extending the participation of the University of 
Massachusetts in the Faculty Dependent Exchange 
Program with participating New England Land-Grant 
Institutions for a period up to three years. 

The Proposal for the University to Enter into Agreements 
with the Federal Extension Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture 



(DOC. T73-186) provides Cooperative Extension employees who will 
retire under the Federal Retirement System with the opportunity of 
enrolling in the Federal Health Benefits and Life Insurance Programs 
Treasurer Johnson pointed out that these plans were excluded for a 
small number of employees who had chosen the Federal Retirement 
System, but retained the state health and insurance plans which will 
terminate when they retire. 

After further brief discussion, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
authorize the Director of the Cooperative Exten- 
sion Service, Dr. Arless A. Spielman, and the 
Treasurer of the University, Kenneth W. Johnson, 
to enter into agreements with the Federal Exten- 
sion Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, for 
administering the Federal Employees Health Benefits 
Act of 1959, and for handling the administrative 
and fiscal provisions of the Federal Employees 
Group Life Insurance Act of 1954. 

Vice Chancellor Marshall expressed unqualified support of 
the Tenure Recommendation, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-197) for Assoc. Prof. 
Pauline Maier. This has the concurrence of Dean Tagliacozzo, College 
I, and Acting Chancellor Hamilton. Replying to Trustee Robertson t 
President Wood explained that early tenure consideration is occasion- 
ally necessary to retain outstanding faculty who are receiving 
attractive offers from other institutions. Provosts Marshall and 
Gluckstern agreed that tenure is a sensitive area requiring continuing 
study and administrative flexibility. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

approve the award of tenure to Dr. Pauline Maier, 
UM/Boston, effective September 1, 1974. 

The Committee then considered the Proposed Merger of the 
School of Nursing and the Department of Public Health to: School of 



Health Sciences, IM/Amherst (DOC. T73-188). President Wood explained 



that discussions underway with the BHE as well as College III and IV 
proposals in this field necessitate delay of Board action until the 
overall statewide structure is resolved. 

Associate Provost Bischoff reviewed the various consider- 
ations leading to the UM/ Amherst request. Among these are the 
lational trend toward extending nursing education through the graduate 
Level, immediate and potential broadening of the faculty and course 
offerings, and placement of the Department of Public Health in a 
School. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern stated that, if the proposed 
nerger is approved by the Board as appropriate at this time, later 
developments at the pan-University level may indicate need for recon- 
sideration; however, course offerings in the sciences are now avail- 
able only at the Amherst campus. 

Dr. Wood noted (1) the volatility of the whole health ser- 
vices field; (2) at UM/Worcester, the Soutter report and the Health 
Ladder Program; (3) at UM/Boston, the developing paraprof essional 
concepts at Colleges III and IV; and (4) the study of the development 
of nursing education in the Commonwealth being undertaken by the BHE 
tfith which Dr. Yarmolinsky is concerned. It was agreed that detailed 
documentation will be provided to UM/Boston and UM/Worcester for 
review and comment prior to Board action (on June 6 or August 1) with 
probable implementation in September 1973. 

The President also asked Secretary McCartney to provide a 
detailed summary of the discussion to Dean Soutter (who had left the 
neeting after presenting the UM/Worcester agenda item) for his 
Information. 

Vice President Edelman stressed the importance of appro- 
priate planning in the nursing and health areas within both the pan- 
Jniversity and the overall higher education communities to meet 
future public and private needs for graduates. 

Turning to the Proposed Merger of the Department of Food 
Science and Technology and the Department of Nutrition and Food to : 



the Department of Food Science and Nutrition, UM/ Amherst (DOC. T73- 



L87), Dr. Bischoff reviewed the general restructuring throughout the 
School of Home Economics in an effort to strengthen the programs and 
Eaculties involved. 



4145 

F & EP Comm. 
5-23-73 

UM/Boston — 
Tenure Recommen- 
dation, Pauline 
Maier 
(DOC. T73-197) 

UM/ Amherst — 
Proposed School 
of Health 
Sciences 
(DOC. T73-188) 



UM/ Amherst — 
Proposed Dept. 
of Food Science 
and Nutrition 
(DOC. T73-187) 



4146 

F & EP Comm. 
5-23-73 



UM/ Amherst — 
Proposed Dept. 
of Food Science 
and Nutrition 
(DOC. T73-187) 

COMMITTEE 



UM/Amherst — 
Tenure 

Recommendations 
(DOC. T73-191) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Drs. Peter L. Pellett (Nutrition and Food) and Frederick J. 
Francis (Food Science and Technology) , heads of the departments 
involved, reviewed recent developments in the food production and 
utilization systems and the increasing demand from companies for 
people trained in these areas. The proposed department would be 
training food scientists and nutritionists and would not compete witt 
the Extension Service whose paraprof essionals teach nutrition at the 
home level. Students would be able to opt for nutrition or food 
sciences at both the graduate and undergraduate levels. Interest in 
both areas has been reflected by a marked increase in enrollment ovei 
the past few years. 

After brief further discussion, it was moved, seconded, anc 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the merger of the Department of Food 
Science and Technology and the Department of 
Nutrition and Food as the Department of Food 
Science and Nutrition in the College of Food 
and Natural Resources, UM/Amherst. 

Vice Chancellor Gluckstern then presented a number of Tenure 



Recommendations, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-191) , some for present faculty 
and others for offers of new appointments. He pointed out that an 
overscale salary is also being proposed for Dr. Louis Auslander who 
is the strong choice as successor to Professor Marshall Stone as 
Birkhoff Professor of Mathematics. General discussion ensued during 
which various aspects relating to the suitability of the candidates 
for appointment were voiced by the administration and the Committee. 
It was mentioned that the number of offers contemplated is normal at 
the end of the academic year when changes in faculty appointments arc 
most likely to occur. Consideration has been given to the tenure 
structure of each department affected, and to the University's com- 
mitment to the Affirmative Action Program. Dr. Gluckstern stated 
that a final report on new faculty appointments will be completed 
soon which should indicate that over 50% of the acceptances are mem- 
bers of minority races and/or women. He also assured Trustee 
Apostola that very positive recommendations regarding teaching 
records have been received in all cases. The Vice Chancellor also 
reviewed the rationale leading to the recommendations for tenure 
awards in five special cases. 

After some general discussion, President Wood called for 
three separate votes. It was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the offer of an overscale appointment 
with tenure to Dr. Louis Auslander as Birkhoff 
Professor of Mathematics, UM/Amherst, effective 
September 1, 1974. 

It was then 



1 



COMMITTEE 



1 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the offers of new appointments with 
tenure at UM/Amherst, as listed in DOC. T73-191; 
also, the award of tenure to Timothy Bornstein, 
Robert Griffith, Erwin Staub, and Richard Tedeschi, 
UM/Amherst. 

It was further 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the award of tenure to Professor Gabriel 
Horvay, UM/Amherst, effective September 1, 1973. 

Trustee Apostola is recorded in opposition. 

Dr. Gluckstern stated the necessity of bringing one more 
tenure request to the Trustees next month because of the recent 
acceptance by Dr. Robert J. Blattner of the offer of appointment as 
Head of the Department of Mathematics, UM/Amherst. 

President Wood reported that he has asked Father Walsh, 
Academic Advisor to the President, to prepare interim rules for 
tenure documentation for consideration by the Provosts and the Dean. 
He also suggested that, in cases of disagreement between a Dean and 
the administration on tenure award, an outside ad hoc committee be 
set up with members appointed as follows: one by the Department, 
one by the campus administration, and one by the Office of the 
President. It is important, he said, to protect the Trustees and 
especially the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy from 
consideration of cases which can be settled another way. 

The President informed the Committee that Professor Wayne 
Corcoran of the School of Business Administration, UM/Amherst, has 
requested a hearing. The University Counsel has completed a review 
and documentation of this case. Legally, it appears that a review 
could be done on the basis of the written record. Mr. Corcoran will 
now be informed by Chancellor Bromery that he may elect to be heard 
by the Committee on Faculty and Educational Policy or a panel there- 
of, or at an informal consultation. This is in accordance with the 
past practice of the Board and the preference of Chairman Troy. 

The meeting was adjourned at 2:50 p.m. 




Robert J. Mq 

Secretary, Mard of Trust 



414' 



/ 



F & EP Coram. 
5-23-73 

UM/Amherst — 
Tenure Recommen- 
dations 
(DOC. T73-191) 



Tenure Policy 



UM/Amherst — 
Hearing , 
Wayne Corcoran 



4148 



COMMITTEE 



UM/Boston — 
Campus Recom- 
mendations on 
Columbia Point 
(DOC. T73-177) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MINUTES OF TRUSTEE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
June 1, 1973; 9:30 a.m.; Office of the President, Boston 

PRESENT: Trustees and Trustee Staff : Chairman Healey, President 
Wood; Trustees Gordon, Rowland, Troy; Treasurer Johnson, 
Secretary McCartney; Mrs. Holden, recorder 

Visiting Trustee : Apostola 

Administrators, Faculty, Staff, and Invited Guests : 

Office of the President : Mr. Searson, Ms. Pugh 

UM/ Amherst : Chancellor Bromery, Mr. Forsyth; Prof. Burke, 
representing Faculty Senate 

UM/Boston : Acting Chancellor Hamilton, Messrs. Rawn and 
Williams; Prof. Lyons, representing faculty 



9:35 a.m. 



The meeting was called to order by Chairman Healey at 



President Wood introduced the Discussion of Campus Recom- 
mendations on Columbia Point, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-177). Since Actinj; 
Chancellor Hamilton's recommendation for a phased move, there has 
been continuing interest on the part of Columbia Point neighborhoods 
Concern is expressed over the actual physical move vis-a-vis the 
Capital Outlay program, the maintenance budget, and recruitment of 
faculty and staff. Acting Chancellor Hamilton reviewed budgetary, 
enrollment, and staffing considerations which directly affect the 
move. Of immediate concern, he said, is assurance that the 396 
positions requested in the FY 1974 budget submitted to the Legisla- 
ture be granted. 

Dr. Hamilton said that the phase-in plan (to Columbia 
Point) starts with the move of administrative functions in July; 
the phase-out plan (from Park Square) terminates some faculty office 
leases in November. President Wood added that plans for the fall 
include the movement of up to 300 students in special programs and 
about 100 administrative and staff personnel. The recent authoriza- 
tion of 18 positions permits the opening of the administration and 
service buildings. However, approximately 70 additional staff 
positions are needed for late-summer occupancy of the science build- 
ing, the two college buildings, and the library with 109 physical 
plant personnel needed when all six buildings are in operation. 

Various alternatives to adjust to budgetary and personnel 
restrictions were discussed. President Wood and Mr. Cass will con- 
tinue their attempts to obtain positive assurances from the Legisla- 
ture regarding these areas. The Trustees will be kept informed. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Turning to the Proposed Statement on the Columbia Point 
,Move and Neighborhood Relations, UM/Boston (DOC. T73-205), President 



Wood noted that the housing issue, while probably the most volatile, 
is largely outside the aegis of the University. The statement is 
intended to clarify the University's commitment in those areas per- 
taining to education for which it has primary responsibility, and 
its support in those areas where it can only help . 

Tim Williams, Assistant to the Chancellor, UM/Boston, men- 
tioned plans for improving communication through a newsletter to be 
distributed in the neighborhoods, open houses at the Columbia Point 
campus, leadership training sessions, a tutorial program, and other 
areas of high impact visibility. He pointed out several long-range 
issues of mutual concern to the entire Dorchester-Columbia Point 
community which will require continued involvement for the University 
including education, employment, transportation, safety, recreation, 
shopping facilities, and housing. 

The President reported that the Trustee Council, which has 
met twice, will be discussing longer-run developments at the Point. 
He emphasized that these will be limited to specific activities. 

Replying to Trustee Croce, Mr. Williams indicated that, 
although 60% of UM/Boston students now live at home (of the 40% not 
doing so, 15% are married and 25% are either alone or with other stu- 
dents), it is difficult to predict the situation after the move to 
Columbia Point. It is anticipated that a general reshifting will 
occur in line with ease of commuting with a resulting split of 50:50 
between those living at home and independently. President Wood added 
that the definition of "citizen" is an apparent problem which may 
mean legal involvement for the University. 

Chairman Healey questioned the omission of reference to 
residences of the faculty and staff. Although there was no knowledge 
of great concern about this type of housing, it was agreed that a 
geographical statement might be helpful. Mr. Healey also felt that 
students who are granted financial assistance should be required to 
certify that they will not attempt to establish private domiciles in 
the Dorchester-Savin Hill-Columbia Point area. 

. Professor Lyons urged that consideration be given to 
married students attempting to establish long-term residences. The 
Committee agreed, but felt proof of intent should be required. Unles 
advised otherwise by Counsel, housing allowances will be excluded 
from financial aid, except in special cases and unless residence is , 
planned outside a certain defined area. Chancellor Bromery, UM/ 
Amherst, pointed out that effective controls can also be included in 
the recruiting and admissions practices and the programs developed 
at UM/Boston. 

President Wood stressed that UM/Boston will continue to 
grow at Columbia Point and that the campus is not completed. General 



4149 



Exec. Coram. 
6-1-73 

UM/Boston — 
Proposed State- 
ment on the 
Columbia Point 
Move and Neigh- 
borhood 
Relations 



4150 

Exec. Comm. 
6-1-73 

UM/Boston — 
Proposed State- 
ment on the 
Columbia Point 
Move and 
NeighboodsMMidTEE 
Relations 
(DOC. T73-205) 



UM/Amherst — 

Proposed 

Revision of 

Faculty Senate 

Constitution and 

Bylaws 

(DOC. T73-196) 



UM/Amherst — 
Proposed Consti- 
tution for the 
Professional 
Association 
(DOC. T73-195) 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

discussion ensued regarding the tenor and strength of the document 
as the Board's public statement. The Committee considered several 
specific sections in line with comments by Trustee Gordon. The 
President pointed out that the University's responsibility should 
not go beyond its ability to fulfill and that, actually, our pre- 
sence at Columbia Point will be a long-term benefit to that area. 

Replying to Trustee Apostola, Mr. Williams said that a 
policy statement from the Trustees is expected by the Dorchester- 
Columbia Point residents; the credibility will come later when the 
policies are carried out. Appreciation was expressed to those who 
had prepared the draft statement as well as to the members of the 
Dorchester-Columbia Point Task Force. 

The general consensus was that the Committee concurred 
with the statement and that this matter should be brought to the 
Board of Trustees on June 6 for its consideration and such action 
as it may care to take. 

Regarding the Proposed Revisions of the Faculty Senate 
Constitution and Bylaws, UM/Amherst (DOC. T73-196), Chancellor 
Bromery explained that the revised Constitution reflects changes in 
the administration of the campus in line with the new Governance 
Document as well as the removal to the revised Faculty Senate Bylaws 
of the committee structure. Professor Burke added that, for the 
first time, the Constitution incorporates the Graduate Council; 
also, that it recognizes that its authority is derived from the 
Trustees. Having confirmed that both documents had been reviewed 
and approved by Counsel, it was moved, seconded, and 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Constitution of the Faculty Senate, 
UM/Amherst, as revised May 14, 1973, and as 
detailed in DOC. T73-196. 

The Committee then considered the Proposed Constitution 
for the Professional Association, UM/Amherst (PA/UMA ) (DOC. T73-195) 
Chancellor Bromery mentioned that, of the two groups within PA/UMA, 
one favored collective bargaining while the other preferred a 
structure similar to the Faculty Senate. The latter has now emerged 
with a Constitution which will give recognition to the group. Mr. 
Searson questioned Article III, Membership, and was assured by Chan- 
cellor Bromery and Professor Burke that they foresaw no problem of 
competition with the Faculty Senate. Dr. Bromery also noted that, 
following Trustee approval of the Constitution, PA/UMA should be 
recognized in the Governance Document. 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 
approve the Constitution of the Professional 
Association of the University of Massachusetts at 
Amherst (PA/UMA) as detailed in DOC. T73-195, 
subject to later incorporation in the Governance 
Document. 



I 



COMMITTEE 



1 



] 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

On motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED : To go into executive session for the purpose of 
discussing the President's Office Staffing. 



After accomplishing this, and on motion made and seconded, 



it was 



VOTED : To come out of executive session for the purpose 
of completing the agenda. * 

Chairman Healey reported that the consensus of the Committe 

was to approve the proposed revisions in staffing of the President's 

Office, and to take this matter to the Board of Trustees for its 
review and action on June 6 . 

President Wood explained the necessity for the Proposed 
Vote on the Cos t-of -Living Increase which will represent the condi- 
tional approval of the Board. After brief discussion, and on motion 
duly seconded, it was 

VOTED : To recommend to the Board of Trustees that, in 
accordance with the provisions of Section 14 of 
Chapter 75 of the General Laws as amended, and the 
provisions of Chapter 319 of the Acts of 1973 and 
the authority contained therein and all other acts 
applicable thereto, each officer and member of the 
professional staff of the University of Massachu- 
£ setts employed in a position paid in whole or in 
part from state funds under subsidiary accounts 
designated 01 and 02 shall for the period beginning 
December 31, 1972, have the rate of his regular 
salary otherwise paid or payable on December 30, 
1972, increased by an amount of three and three-tenths 
percent. Such increase shall not be applied to any 
salary rate previously fixed by vote of the Trustees, 
or under authority delegated by the Trustees, for 
any such new professional employee entering the 
service of the University of Massachusetts on or 
after December 31, 1972. The President of the 
University is hereby authorized to take all actions 
necessary or desirable to implement this Act and to 
also apply an increase not to exceed three and three- 
tenths percent to the regular salary in the same 
manner to all members of the professional staff and 
classified employees normally paid from other than 
state funds who in his judgment are in categories or 
employment equivalent to the intent and scope of 
said Chapter 319. Provided, however, that in the 
case of those paid from institute, grant or contract 
funds the recommendations and certification of the 
availability of funds by the cognizant principal 
investigator or director shall be a prerequisite to 
the payment of any such increase. 



4151 



Exec. Comm. 
6-1-73 



President's 
Office — 
Staffing 



Proposed Vote 
on Cost-of- 
living Increase 



4152 

Exec. Comm. 
6-1-73 

Fiscal Year 1974 
Expenditures 
(DOC. T73-200) 



COMMITTEE 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

In connection with Fiscal Year 1974 Expenditures (DOC. T73- 
200), President Wood explained that, until the Legislature acts upon 
the FY 1974 Budget Request, the University must operate under a con- 
tinuing resolution which authorizes the expenditure of funds. On 
motion made and seconded, it was 

VOTED ; To recommend to the Board of Trustees that they 

authorize the President to approve the expenditure 
of state and nonstate funds by the three campuses, 
Office of the President, and the Institute for 
Governmental Services from July 1, 1973, until 
such time as the Board of Trustees adopts the 
Operating Budget for Fiscal Year 1974. 

The approval of expenditure of state funds shall 
be consistent with the appropriate state statutes 
governing the Fiscal Year 1974 appropriation. 

The approval of expenditure of nonstate funds shall 
be consistent with the general policies established 
by the Board of Trustees governing these funds. The 
collection of fees and the expenditures of fee-based 
trust funds shall be consistent with the fee policies 
already approved by the Board of Trustees. 

The meeting was adjourned at 11:30 a.m. 



I 



I 




Robert J. M< 
Secretary,